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I received this email from Glow, Inc, who makes some of the best glow in the dark stuff. They are clearing inventory so there are some good prices. If you are not familiar with GID powder, you can mix it with slow curing epoxy to paint your sights. I haven't used this particular colored GID powder, but I have used their green GID powder and it works well.

Greetings!

Everyone enjoyed our last clearance. Therefore, Glow Inc. has decided to clear out some more excess pigment.

For this Leap Year, we are offering a unique glow powder that is fluorescent light purple during the day and glows green at night. The sale price is $19.99 for 4 ounces (about 75% off). The deal is good until we run out.

To purchase, visit:

Specials


Hope you enjoy the sale,

Danny
 

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I thought that maybe it was something you added to hand loads to make tracers! :D Seriously though, thanks for the info -- I will check it out.
 

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Sounds like a very good sale!

I thought that maybe it was something you added to hand loads to make tracers! :D
Well, if you painted that stuff on the backsides of the bullets before you load them into the shell casings, it might work. It would be an interesting experiment to try!
 

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i thought it was reloading powder, might go better on gun parts, nice reading, thanks for posting
 

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I am a scientific lampworker (glassblower for chemistry) and for the past ten + years i have been researching and testing a product called Glow Glass it is a thermally stabil (+3000*F) glow in the dark pigment that is non: toxic, radioactive, hazardous, carcinogenic. not too shure it would be that great as a reloading additive but i do know that it is thermoluminescent as well so the heat of the discharge may activate it
 

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interesting thoughts. You could paint the backside of the bullet, and watch it fly in the dark!
 

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Interesting concept, but I have a question. Does the paint have to charge up in natural light? If so, and if the gun rarely sees natural light every day like mine, how will it glow in the dark when you really need it to? Also, how long does it glow in the dark before it fades?
 
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