Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hydrogen Peroxide and White Vinigar. Mix 50/50 stop up the end of your barrel (I use a cork from a wine bottle,cut to fit) stand it up and let sit for a few minutes and presto you have got a whole lota lead. Next some solvent (to get the residue) and a few passes of the chore boy wrapped bore brush, wipe all that out with a clean patch, and you got yourself a CLEAN barrel!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
Good idea, may have to give it a try. One question isn't hydrogen peroxide a oxidizer. Oxidizers are very corrosive to metal. Have you noticed any pitting in your barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, no pitting, I saw this method on another forum and have cleaned this way only a few times.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,276 Posts
Gray_Wolf said:
I'd be VERY careful with using vinigar on BLUED guns. It will take the finish off!
+1!

I've been very happy with Noxon7 Metal Cleaner for getting rid of Lead and Copper in barrels.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,627 Posts
All of these home remedies fascinate me, but I don't know why anybody would take a chance with metal corrosion, de-bluing, or any of the other negatives, when there are now products on the market, CHEAP products, that essentially do the exact same thing and will not remove finishes, hurt polymers, harm metals, or anything else. If these products cost a mint, I'd kinda understand, but they don't....the foaming bore cleaner, break-free, and any other number of cleaners are pretty low cost and do a great job. Same thing with gun cleaner/lubricant - why anybody would use brake cleaner, WD-40, or anything else not specifically made for a gun is beyond me. Again, cost is the determiniing factor for me - these cleaners/lubricants they put out today are excellent, and are low-cost.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,627 Posts
Sorry - I won't knock it anymore, and I have no intention of trying it......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
CLP or Rem Oil and a few rounds with a brass brush with a tight patch run through in between.

I'm a little OCD about the clean bore too, but truth told, the lead will shoot out and be replaced by more lead before it is shot out and replaced by more lead, and so on and so on.

My Dad hasn't put so much as a patch down a gun barrel in more than 20 years. Shoots lead exclusively. No problems. Unless someone like me looks down the barrel and gets the hebee gebees at the sight of the funk.

--jcd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
texastaurusguy said:
Sorry - I won't knock it anymore, and I have no intention of trying it......
Think I'll stick with commercial lead removal products, but thanks for the tip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You know Mulerider93 you might have something there. I started this post, and let me say that I have had no pitting or loss of blueing, and when done cleaning the barrel (with this method) it looks brand spinking new. Like the one at the intro. of the James Bond movies. That being said I was at the range last week and the gun (pt145) was shooting like it did when it was new, left and high. perhaps its best to leave a little lead in the barrel, because mine was shootn' better (accriaute) with a bit of lead left in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
There is some truth to the saying that a barrel can be "too clean". A bore scope will reveal all the microscopic pitting, machine tool marks, fire cracking of the throat, and other imperfections within the bore. A passing bullet will fill these imperfections in giving the next round a smoother surface to travel.

This is why after a thorough cleaning, it may take a few sighters to get the firearm to "walk back into zero". Hand lapped match barrels may take only a couple sighters to shoot @ zero again, while rougher bores may take a dozen or more.

As the bore fills with more powder residue and lead, accuracy will peak and eventually start to fall off until it's time to clean again. How long accuracy remains usable will depend on the roughness of the bore and the requirement for accuracy. If all the user needs is pie-plate accuracy at a particular distance, then cleanings may be needed only infrequently. However, if thousandths of an inch is what separates the winner from 2nd place, then the user may have to swab the bore in between strings.

"Too clean of a barrel syndrome" tends to be more of a problem in benchrest, palma and other high power centerfire rifle competitions than in handgun shooting.

I've never seen a barrel "wore out" from shooting lead. Lead is so much softer than steel, that it will have a negligible effect on the rifling. However I have witnessed 2 detrimental effects on firearms from shooting lead, both fortunately are very preventable.

1) Gas cutting of the throat. Usually comes from undersized bullets that are too hard to fully obturate and get a good gas seal between the bullet and the bore. The hot propellant gases curl around the edges of the bullet and directly cut into the steel of the barrel, causing erosion of the barrel throat over time. Cured by using gas checks, using softer lead, and/or correctly sizing the bullet to the bore. This is why many lead shooters oversize their lead bullets by .001" respective to the bore. However, for this to work correctly, you need to know the true bore dimensions. Your owner's manual will not help in this regard as machining tolerances vary from barrel to barrel. This is why many users will slug the bore to know what the true bore dimensions are before pouring bullets.

2) Bulging barrels. Too much lead has been allowed to accumulate in the barrel causing it to bulge, sometimes in several spots within the bore. A user may not even notice the barrel has bulged until the first time he cleans the barrel with a tight fitting jag. The jag will pass more easily in different spots as it's pushed down the barrel. After cleaning, it may take many shots (a dozen or even 100+) before accuracy is restored with the accumulated lead filling in the bulge. To prevent it, clean often, but it doesn't have to be so aggressive that every speck of lead is removed; just enough to prevent loss of accuracy.

Some say shooting jacketed bullets every X number of rounds of lead will also "shoot out" the accumulated lead. I haven't tried this, so I can't really comment on this technique, but from what I've read it may warrant exploration.

If the barrel is already bulged, you can either replace the barrel or just stop cleaning except for a brush to knock the boulders out every so often. I've witnessed any number of bulged barrels that still had usable accuracy, but only so long as the barrel was kept dirty. Once the bulged barrel was cleaned, its groups more resembled a shotgun pattern than anything else.

Each firearm has a character all it's own from the one sitting next to it on the assembly line. I've seen rough bores shoot like a wet dream and so called "match" barrels not be able to hold 3-4 MOA, much less MOA. It's just that barrels TEND to have lost accuracy for X number of shots after a very thorough cleaning, then accuracy peaks before accuracy TENDS to fall off as it gets dirtier. Where X lies, depends on the character of the firearm.

This is just from my experience, so your mileage may vary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
COOL AND INFORMATIVE POST And a hell of a lot more "accuriate" than my spelling. Thank You for the info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
texastaurusguy,... Now we'll give the Gunner's some Real True INFO...

Note: I have a Gallon Can of WD-40 on the Bench Right Now...<:))
Note: ~Don't Trust what I have to Say... Trust the Old Man...!!!~
I know you Gunner's "Worship at the Alter" of "The Box O' Truth"... Soooooo... Guess what...??? You see the Old Man using a Spray Bottle of WD-40...!!! You can trust the Old Man...<:))
Educational Zone #47 - Cleaning a Semi-Auto Pistol
http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu47.htm
______________________________________________________
WD-40 is for GUNS...!!! And even lists it to get the LEAD OUT...!!!
Go to the Web Site Link, and type GUNS in the Search BOX...!!! Now could we Put the OLD WIFES TAIL that's BEING SPREAD about WD-40 to BED...!!!...<:))
~
~WD-40 Web Site~
http://www.wd40.com/uses-tips
~
GUNS~Categories & Functions
20 uses found.
~
Cleans and lubricates BB guns
Cleans antique guns
Lubricates chalk guns
Lubricates dart guns
Lubricates nail guns
Lubricates pellet guns
Lubricates potato guns
Lubricates staple guns
Cleans gunk from pricing guns
Displaces moisture from guns after cleaning
Lubricates airless paint guns
Lubricates power actuated guns
Lubricates pump-action guns
Prevents rust on guns used in the field
Removes camouflage tape from guns
Removes crud from antique guns
Removes gunk from surface of guns
Removes lead buildup on guns
Drives moisture and mud from duck guns
Lubricates primacord and the port plugs on perforating guns
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,931 Posts
But BUT! It still sucks if you let it harden in a gun your not gonna use for weeks or months. I keep WD everywhere, but personally I have never used it on a gun. That is just me!!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,627 Posts
Breakfree is good stuff.....that foaming bore cleaner is great too, saves me bunches of patches, lead turns a bluish color and copper turns reddish.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top