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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got tired of having to change out the batteries in the 3 LED motion lights in the safe and finally bought a 16' LED strip light off Amazon. New LED's have a adhesive backing and mounted them to some scrap 3/4" aluminum angle iron I had in the shop. Lucked out as there was a 120 volt receptacle on the other side of the closet wall in the same stud cavity so that made adding the plug easy. Drilled a 1/2" hole in the side to run the low voltage cable through then sealed the opening with fire caulk. Lights came with a motion sensor for 1, 3, or 10 minutes on before shutting off. Love all the light I have now anytime I open the door.
 

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That's usually how it starts. First you just add some lights but next thing you know, you're buildin' in a bar and then come the recliners and pretty soon, it's too crowded in there and ya' have to upgrade to a bigger safe. Yep...:confused:...been down that road.
 

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I installed RGB lights under my kitchen cabinets . I can choose from hundreds of different hues and even have them pulsate to music ! Put those in your safe and play the theme from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.
 

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How does drilling a hole and putting melting/flammable material through it compromise the fire/flood rating of the safe?
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Flood rating? I'm not aware of any safes that carry a flood rating? Not saying that they aren't any but I'm sure it would add to the overall cost of the safe. I don't live in a flood zone either. I haven't compromised the fire rating of the safe as I used a Underwriter's Laboratory (UL) 2 hour listed intumescent fire caulk which expands during a fire to close off and seal the opening. This product is used in commercial buildings to seal around electrical conduits that pass through 2 hour rated walls required by national building and electrical codes. The low voltage transformer is also listed and the 120 volt circuit providing power is protected with a Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) which looks at the electrical sign wave of the load and hopefully de-energizes the circuit in an arcing type event. The biggest chance to damage to low voltage devices are typically caused by over voltages due to line surges caused by lightning strikes or by lines surges from the local utility company. There is always a chance of a shock or fire hazard with any electrical device, you just try to make things as safe as possible to protect persons and your property.
With that said I'm not crazy about buying any product made in China, but it's pretty difficult to find products of this type that are not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
P.S. If you live in an area with a lot of lighting such as Texas or Florida or have a local utility CO-OP like I do living in the country which we lose power quite a bit. It a good idea to install a surge protective device (SPD). This will hopefully protect your home and sensitive electronics like your TV, heat pump, VSD for pool pumps. ect. I have 2, one is a Type I installed ahead of the electrical panel and a Type 2 on the load side of the circuit breakers. Just my 2c.
 

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Flood rating? I'm not aware of any safes that carry a flood rating? Not saying that they aren't any but I'm sure it would add to the overall cost of the safe. I don't live in a flood zone either. I haven't compromised the fire rating of the safe as I used a Underwriter's Laboratory (UL) 2 hour listed intumescent fire caulk which expands during a fire to close off and seal the opening. This product is used in commercial buildings to seal around electrical conduits that pass through 2 hour rated walls required by national building and electrical codes. The low voltage transformer is also listed and the 120 volt circuit providing power is protected with a Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) which looks at the electrical sign wave of the load and hopefully de-energizes the circuit in an arcing type event. The biggest chance to damage to low voltage devices are typically caused by over voltages due to line surges caused by lightning strikes or by lines surges from the local utility company. There is always a chance of a shock or fire hazard with any electrical device, you just try to make things as safe as possible to protect persons and your property.
With that said I'm not crazy about buying any product made in China, but it's pretty difficult to find products of this type that are not.
Yeah, maybe it isn't called "flood rating" but it seems that safes have some type of rating that may protect them from standing in water, such as may be found in a basement after a house fire. I'll have to search the Internet for some videos of that fire rated caulk sealing up a hole. I've used the stuff myself when I built an ammo chest, but I didn't realize it would seal a hole after-the-fact. I assumed it just sealed cracks that existed when it applied. If it expands to seal holes, that's great.
 
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