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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Acquired additional chumdillyishesness today. Early Taurus, 5 Screw, 3 in Snub, Blued, 38. Late 60's, early 70's most likely. Marked INT Distributors which if you are into conspiracy theories and believe internet dillywackers, INT Distributors was the CIA's Super Secret FL Shell Store Front for covertness kinda shenanigans in the early 70s.

Came with original box and a lovely 1976 recall notice. I suppose its too late to get the recall work done, though this one has a pressed in hardened insert around the firing pin, something I've never seen before on these. Could be that's what was up. Anyway, the recall doesn't say what was needed so we'll assume someone accidentally fingered off a round, blamed the gun and the manufacturer decided to fix em all, I think that's typically how it goes.

Anyway....to the box and the initial photos. Cleaning and new springs after supper and I should have shooting impressions tomorrow.

I know somebody's been in it cause the screws are buggered but I have new ones and lets hope the guts have not been molested.

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Oh, that is very cool. Keep the pictures and news coming! Congratulations!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks good inside. Years old dried grease had it gummed up and the ejector rod was loose. But, thoroughly cleaned, dry lubed inside and out with EEZOX and good Rig Grease touched to pivot/slide and wear points.

After cleaning and lubrication the ejector rod assembly was hucked up and torqued into place.

An 11 lb Wolff Mainspring and a 10 lb Wolff Rebound Slide spring was installed and function tested with the strain screw head flush with the grip frame. Double action pull is just over 8 lbs and the single breaks clean just under 4 lbs. Overall, a very nice feeling trigger and should be quite manageable.

Here snugged away in its own OutBag Holster waiting to head out.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here we go, more info on the above recall of 1976.......

TAURUS,
MODEL 74,
32 SMITH & WESSON CALIBER, REVOLVER

MODEL 80, 82, 84 & 86,
38 SPECIAL CALIBER, REVOLVER

MODEL 94 & 96,
22 LONG RIFLE CALIBER, REVOLVER

WARNING:
The listed Taurus revolvers, when dropped from a height of three feet on the hammer may discharge.

RevolversSerial Numbers BELOW the following:
Model 74, Blue701,219
Model 74, Nickel699,118
Model 80, 3" Blue1,000,225 (not including 977,537 through 977,582)
Model 80, 3" Nickel977,656, and 987,259 to 987,358
Model 80, 4" Blue1,035,178
Model 80, 4" Nickel1,001,684
Model 82, 3" Blue996,964Model 82, 3" Nickel1,014,120
Model 82, 4" Blue1,025,816
Model 82,4" Nickel1,034,375
Model 84, Blue1,026,497
Model 84, Nickel1,009,613 through 1,009,655 & 1,009,626 through 1,009,655
Model 861,011,470
Model 94, Blue94,170
Model 94, Nickel94,206
Model 9697,336
Source:

  • Shooting Industry, June 1977; page ?
  • AFTE Journal, April, 1978; Volume 10, Number 2:33-38
 

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The pressed in “insert” around the firing pin is the firing pin bushing. This is commonly seen in firearms with exposed hammers and was considered a wear part. I suspect that the recall involved a lack of a hammer block since there is a caution about dropping the revolver in the letters you posted.
I noted the S&W logo at the bottom of the letters and recall that the Bangor Punta conglomerate owned both companies at that time. Smith and Wesson and Taurus were known to share information while under that ownership.
 

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Acquired additional chumdillyishesness today. Early Taurus, 5 Screw, 3 in Snub, Blued, 38. Late 60's, early 70's most likely. Marked INT Distributors which if you are into conspiracy theories and believe internet dillywackers, INT Distributors was the CIA's Super Secret FL Shell Store Front for covertness kinda shenanigans in the early 70s.

Came with original box and a lovely 1976 recall notice. I suppose its too late to get the recall work done, though this one has a pressed in hardened insert around the firing pin, something I've never seen before on these. Could be that's what was up. Anyway, the recall doesn't say what was needed so we'll assume someone accidentally fingered off a round, blamed the gun and the manufacturer decided to fix em all, I think that's typically how it goes.

Anyway....to the box and the initial photos. Cleaning and new springs after supper and I should have shooting impressions tomorrow.

I know somebody's been in it cause the screws are buggered but I have new ones and lets hope the guts have not been molested.

View attachment 481754 View attachment 481755 View attachment 481756 View attachment 481758 View attachment 481759 View attachment 481760
This could be a whole separate thread. "Should I carry this gun with a round under the hammer?"
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sure. It has a hammer block. If your into dropping guns you should likely be forced into a trailer park with reality show loosers and live on Bush beer and slim Jim's only.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So, I have a handle on why this one has buggered side plate screws. Occasionally the hammer locks against the rear and side of the cylinder latch mechanism. This may also be why the extractor rod was loose on receipt. In short, the plunger at the aft end of the cylinder doesn't always push the cylinder latch mechanism back far enough to clear the tail of the hammer.

Some light clearancing on the rear of the release mechanism may resolve the problem, if not i have replacement parts that I can install and/or fit.

From a shooting perspective, its very nice. The double and single action modes are smooth and predictable. Probably as much a function of the clean friction surfaces as the wolf springs.

Front sight is really low as the 125g FMJ rounds all strike very high at 5 yards. I'll have to see if it prints to poi some of the heavily loaded full wad cutters, as that's my carry load anyway.

I ordered a BK grip adapter to work with the original grips as the factory panels are in great condition. (And the position of the mainspring and strut won't allow for a round butt conversion with installation of the Altimont Falconia)

So, its off and running. I think this one will be replacing my LCR for every day carry. Arthritis means the little ones are now too hard to shoot and the 380 is so marginal anyway. I'll be fine with sacrificing the pocket carry convenience for easy/secure grip and the much greater terminal performance of a quality 38 Special load.
 

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It´s a pre-1973 Taurus revolver.

Brazilian police forces, up to 1990´s, had orders to keep an empty chamber aligned with the hammer.

Many revolvers were used by decades and received poor maintenance. It was very commom that the hammer block bars were lost during disassembly.
 

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So, I have a handle on why this one has buggered side plate screws. Occasionally the hammer locks against the rear and side of the cylinder latch mechanism. This may also be why the extractor rod was loose on receipt. In short, the plunger at the aft end of the cylinder doesn't always push the cylinder latch mechanism back far enough to clear the tail of the hammer.

Some light clearancing on the rear of the release mechanism may resolve the problem, if not i have replacement parts that I can install and/or fit.

From a shooting perspective, its very nice. The double and single action modes are smooth and predictable. Probably as much a function of the clean friction surfaces as the wolf springs.

Front sight is really low as the 125g FMJ rounds all strike very high at 5 yards. I'll have to see if it prints to poi some of the heavily loaded full wad cutters, as that's my carry load anyway.

I ordered a BK grip adapter to work with the original grips as the factory panels are in great condition. (And the position of the mainspring and strut won't allow for a round butt conversion with installation of the Altimont Falconia)

So, its off and running. I think this one will be replacing my LCR for every day carry. Arthritis means the little ones are now too hard to shoot and the 380 is so marginal anyway. I'll be fine with sacrificing the pocket carry convenience for easy/secure grip and the much greater terminal performance of a quality 38 Special load.
I advise you to try standard ammo (158 grains, lead round nose). Maybe you can obtain better accuracy, because in Brazil we had only lead round nose and wadcutters in the 1960 ans 1970´s. Factory did not considered other loads in sight adjustment and rifling pitch.

It´s also possible that the front sight was reduced in height. These revolvers, normally, comes from factory with a sharp edge, triangle-shaped front sight, like in the box illustration. Maybe a former owner could wanted to remove the sharp corners.

The only way to discover is firing it with 158-grain, LRN ammo (I recommend Remington or Magtech, closer to Brazilian-made ammo at that time). If you get accuracy, the answer is in the my first paragraph. If the problem persists, the second one is the answer.

The extractor rod must be inspected frequentlly. It has a commom thread (clockwise to tighten). It can loosen with the cylinder spin. Only in beggining of 1980´s this problem was corrected, when an inverted thread (clockwise to loosen) was adopted. A drop of Loctite in the extractor rod thread prevents this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It´s a pre-1973 Taurus revolver.

Brazilian police forces, up to 1990´s, had orders to keep an empty chamber aligned with the hammer.

Many revolvers were used by decades and received poor maintenance. It was very commom that the hammer block bars were lost during disassembly.
This one is in very fine condition. Low use. Definatly not a police issue. All parts are there. Just needs some inspection and tweak I think. It'll be a good one once it's put back to 10o %
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Fully up and running now. Given the low wear and tear on all the parts of this gun, internal and external, I suspect its history went something like this.

Fitted at the factory, somewhat poorly as concerns the tail of the hammer and the aft shelf of the cylinder release, but it passed all function tests and was shipped/sold.

The new owner noted that occasionally (never when dry firing) when firing, the cylinder would bind and the gun needed to have the cylinder latch pulled a hair to the rear to release for continued firing.

The new owner or a buddy then opened the gun, buggering the head of the grip screw and all four of the side plate screws.

The cylinder latch bar was removed, flipped over and peened with a hammer in attempt to stretch it far enough that the tail of the hammer and the latch shelf would clearance.

The gun was reassembled, fired, locked up, placed back in its box to rest 1 to 50 years until it made its way here.


Simple job, didn't require even diving into the rare parts supply. A few licks with a fine stone, some polish of the honed surface an a good part is now a great and fully functional part. Clearance established for firing and all other safety functions retained.

Here some spare parts to illustrate the interface/interference area.

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