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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK.. I've seen lots of ye's & no's about dry firing.

I was at the range last week, it was empty, I chatted with a guy working there about my "low & left" shooting - he didn't know pistols but said another guy there ( son of the owners!) does - he trains local police/SWAT & tactical teams ( & he's like 25 freaking yrs old!!)

He walked by as I was shooting & the other guy called him over to talk to me.
Told him I was a new shooter & he watched me & told me ( which I already knew from here!) that I was pulling the trigger with the joint of my finger & twitching/jerking in anticipation of the shot. And that practice & discipline would fix that.

He also told me that he -always!- recommends that newcomers shoot around 70%/30% dry vs live!! Just to get the feel of the trigger & the anticipation factor. Then to change the percentages with time & experience.

?? being argumentative like I am, I say "But I'd heard that dry firing is bad for the gun?" He says, "Bull, this is a new gun, it's a good gun, it's fine!"
I say, "OK". Who am I to argue with experience like his when I have none!? :)

So... being the avid reader here that I am.. I go get a couple 'snap caps' at a local (Houston) gun show today, since I don't want to take a chance on dry firing being harmful no matter what. ( might as well use a $4 snap cap, right? what the heck..)

But.. this PT111 being the SA/DA that it is, I wonder if dry-firing is any good practice for me & the 'feel' & anticipation thing?

Since when I put the snap cap in & rack it; the first pull is SA, but afterwards all are DA, since it's not ejecting & racking in a new round & giving me another SA trigger pull!!??

Or am I overthinking this whole thing?

I also can't wrap my brain around 'dry firing' being much good anyway, since I -know- there's not going to be an explosion & recoil, so I'm not 'anticipating' anything & it just feels like a waste of my time, whether or not I'm damaging the gun or wasting money on a couple snap caps.

Is dry firing --really-- worth a damn in any beneficial way??

See ? I ramble in these posts.. I'm sorry..
Tim
 

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I think the point of dry firing 70% would be repetition - we do things the way we practice them, and if you re-inforce the correct trigger pull and not anticipating that shot, eventually your habits probably take over......just a guess on my part.....I don't have any guidance on whether it's okay to dry fire - I think I was in another link a couple of weeks ago where it was kinda decided that you shouldn't do it a whole lot, but some probably won't hurt.
 

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Trust me, dry firing will do wonders for a flinch.

Another thing that will work wonders is shoot a mag full of ammo, then release the slide on an empty mag, take aim, and dry fire. You'll see just how much you're flinching. Dry fire until you get rid of your flinch, then load up and shoot another mag, repeat the dry firing, etc....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, OK, then.. who am I to argue with the voice of experience!!?
( But it's what I do! I just -know- that _i know_ there won't be a 'bang', so I won't flinch! I'm smarter than that!)

:)

But seriously... the guy at the range who trains police & SWAT tells me dry-firing is good for me. A co-worker ( big-time gun guy!) tells me he was told to dry-fire while watching TV ( shoot the people on TV!) - you folks are telling me that dry-firing is a good practice routine...

OK, fine.. I'll take y'alls word for it!
No more arguing from me!
Thanks everyone!

( & PS, I don't know if it's bad for the gun/firing pin or not, there's so many conflicting opinions... but I got a couple snap caps that make it a moot point for me either way!)

Tim

(should I have a sig that shows "PT111 MilPro - my only gun"!? )
 
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