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Just wondering who bore sights their guns and how well it works.

Recently purchased a Laserlyte universal kit and I found out it does
not work well with flash suppressors.

I have ordered a couple of caliber specific lasers and give them a try.
 

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I've only used the caliber specific versions that look like a cartridge case but they worked for me. I used one when putting new Tru-Glo sights on a Springfield XDm-40 and another one when adjusting the iron sights on a new AR-15. They allowed me to get my sights set without the need to fire a shot, which is handy in a back yard in the suburbs. I took each firearm to the range shortly afterward to verify the results, figuring I'd need to do some final tweaks but neither one required any additional adjustment. I'm not sure how much may have been luck but I'll take it.

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When I'm shooting a new or new to me rifle I usually take a large piece of cardboard to the range and set it up at 50 yards. I put 1" orange stick on dots on the cardboard to use as targets. I'll use cheaper ammo at 50 yards to get on target. I have used both a collator type of bore sighter and the method that Lomax posted and they both work well to get you fairly close. Once I'm adjusted at 50 yards I move out to 100 yards. I like to have at least one box of premium ammo to try at 100 yards and also several variations of handloads. I always zero at 100 yards and put a piece of blue painters tape on the gun with my cheater notes for bullet drop at various ranges based on the ammo that works best in that rifle.
 

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I use this BSA boresighting kit, since I have several rifles in different calibers. It's saved me and my friends quite a bit on ammo.
bsa_boresighter.jpg
 

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When I'm shooting a new or new to me rifle I usually take a large piece of cardboard to the range and set it up at 50 yards. I put 1" orange stick on dots on the cardboard to use as targets. I'll use cheaper ammo at 50 yards to get on target. I have used both a collator type of bore sighter and the method that Lomax posted and they both work well to get you fairly close. Once I'm adjusted at 50 yards I move out to 100 yards. I like to have at least one box of premium ammo to try at 100 yards and also several variations of handloads. I always zero at 100 yards and put a piece of blue painters tape on the gun with my cheater notes for bullet drop at various ranges based on the ammo that works best in that rifle.
I find that a rifle that hits a little below zero at 25 yards will be an inch or two over zero at 100. Zero at 100 from there. I shoot my hunting rifles to abt 1.5" high at 100, it'll be zero at about 250 plus or minus depending upon caliber. Of couse my 7 mag shoots a bit flatter than my .257 Roberts or my .308.
 

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It depends on the type of firearm and the caliber. If it is something like a .22 rimfire rifle I will just start out close like 20 yards and I don't mind at all shooting up a box of ammo, But if it is a .50 caliber black powder muzzle loader it gets bore sighted as the hunting ammo with sabots is expensive and so damn dirty I try to keep the round count down.
 

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I always thought that laser bore sights were kind of a gimmicky item. I'd rather spend money on ammo.

This is the only method I've ever used, and the only necessary method. Lasers are ok, but surely not needed and only good for getting the shot on paper. Not for zeroing.
 

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If you can lock in your rifle/pistol on a bench, then using the one shot method to get on paper will work. I final site rifles from a deck railing, but start out with a caliber specific laser bore site in my basement after installing the optic. I have a 90' long area in basement that works for laser sighting. Then go outside and site from my railing or off the shoulder to fine tune. Follow same process for pistol optics.
 

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Well, of course you need a good solid rest/shooting bench unless you're a human bench rest. :rolleyes: Precision is the key.
 
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I use this BSA boresighting kit, since I have several rifles in different calibers. It's saved me and my friends quite a bit on ammo.
View attachment 447835

similar to what I use, except its a old Redfield unit.
kept it from the old gun shop days.
all I ever bore sight are rifles that have scopes on them and as I don't hunt any longer haven't used it in years.
with pistols I just start at 12 yards and zero roughly, then move back to 20-25 yards and zero it there from a rest.
that's using regular sights or even a red dot.
 

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I have a cheap universal green laser bore sighter. Puts me on paper every time. Have had mixed results with the ones that look like a round of ammo. But they do work pretty good in pistol calibers. The other type won't work in a real short barreled pistol.
 
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