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I pose that question because wing shooting is sport where the shooter has to make a quick decision. Sure, some birds are a piece of cake. Dove, Geese, quail, you just recognize what they are and start blasting. Pheasant get's a little harder as you can't shoot hen's in Texas. They usually both come up in front of you and you have two things distinguishing the difference, Color and shape, the male has much longer tail feathers so you have to make a quick judgement call. Ducks add some other dimensions, but at least the birds may be circling or coming in, so it offers more time, but then considering how many waterfowl there are, and the point system, a lot still has to register before pulling the trigger.

I know folks get attacked by bear, mountain lions and wild hogs when they are on deer or Elk hunts, but it is a rarity to have to make quick shots if you are in a blind.

No doubt a bear hunting guide, hog hunting guide has had to make some quick decisions as well as safari hunting guides. But unless we have a Canadian who will argue about how often he gets charged by a moose, most have time to make the decision. A good wing shooter will usually be able to pull off a target if there is something wrong in his sight picture, like a living being (helps improve the life span o your favorite bird dog) and property which helps the suburban retain it's value.

Looking back at my little hog snaring expedition and killing two hogs back to back, I placed all six shots (.38 special +P) fairly quickly. Neck, Head, shoulder, shoulder, shoulder, shoulder. The second hog with a 20 gauge 7 1/2 shot and at five yards, shoulder, back of head, back of head. There was no discussion with my friend who had set the snares. He was not armed, and while we used to hunt a lot together, I still found out that he was fairly trusting, considering we had just checked a snare where the hog had broken loose.

I had never been that close to a live angry feral hog, snared or not, and it did yell urgent and my adrenalin got to pumping. In hindsight, everything was pretty much reaction, but thoughts were going on. I would like to think I could react the same way in a defensive shooting against an armed intruder. I know one thing though, I'll load up magnums next time I go checking snares for hogs.
 
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Awareness and common sense are importent in any type of shooting be it defensive, or hunting. So being a wing shooter probably can't hurt. Better? Probably not. Practice in a particular type of shooting sport is what makes you better!
 
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Only if the dirtbag is running and you have to lead him.
I do have a BIL who is unbelievably quick with his shot. I've been with him, when he's taken shots (good ones) from his hip.
 

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I say yes, I've quail hunted since I was old enough to hold a scattergun and my pistol shooting is pretty good.
 
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Not sure it would but I do see your point.
I grew up a quail hunter and only hunted with a shotgun until I was much older and while I don't shoot clays regular I am well above average when I do.

In my 20's I really embraced the pistol and is the type I shoot the most now. I am pretty good at target and bulls eye type shooting but I am much better at instinctual shooting and speed based shooting, such as USPSA/IPSC and Steel Challenge and when wanting to show off can tear up a pop can thrown in the air with a pistol. I have always thought my history with wing shooting provided me with an advantage and since my strong suits are sports that relate closer to defensive shooting than bulls eye, I tend to agree with you. I hope I never have to put it to the test in an actual defensive situation though.

Also I am sure being cool under fire is the most important part in actually using a gun to defend yourself.
 

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Only if the dirtbag is running and you have to lead him.
I do have a BIL who is unbelievably quick with his shot. I've been with him, when he's taken shots (good ones) from his hip.
Or flying.robing :eek:
 

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The psyche plays a big role in this scenario. You know you're looking for a bird to draw down on. Put yourself in a building where bad guys and civies are roaming and your shot will slow down. I promise you it will! You have to factor in target recognition.
 

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I have been a wing shooter since I was about 10, Dove first,then quail and pheasant.About 25 I had the great pleasure of making friends with some sea duck hunters from Ma.That taught me a new way to shoot. A bobing boat in the ocean and a moving target with no back ground to judge distance.I say all this because you (we) need to practice all our shooting skills. Did shotguns help with the pistol,probobly. Bird shooting in the south, deep in the piney woods is not just blasting away. You need one eye on that little blur while the other is trying to see the hole in the timber he's going to give you a quick shot placement. Practice diifferent methods.The conequences of shooting the hen instead of the rooster can be costly but not as bad as picking up the wrong target in a defensive situation. Sorry for the rant.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have been a wing shooter since I was about 10, Dove first,then quail and pheasant.About 25 I had the great pleasure of making friends with some sea duck hunters from Ma.That taught me a new way to shoot. A bobing boat in the ocean and a moving target with no back ground to judge distance.I say all this because you (we) need to practice all our shooting skills. Did shotguns help with the pistol,probobly. Bird shooting in the south, deep in the piney woods is not just blasting away. You need one eye on that little blur while the other is trying to see the hole in the timber he's going to give you a quick shot placement. Practice diifferent methods.The conequences of shooting the hen instead of the rooster can be costly but not as bad as picking up the wrong target in a defensive situation. Sorry for the rant.
Not a rant, a good opinion! Yes, bird hunting is not a high pressure situation, at least not after you have flushed the first covey of quail and cleaned your drawers out, it's not. That first flush always gets me no matter how ready I think I am.
 

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Food on the table is the same as bad guy on the deck, just saying. This can be :jiml:
 

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I think it can make a difference, because wing shooting teaches you to be intuitively reactive to the target. I have actually found myself responding this way when shooting. It's good training too, because in tactical/defense situations, the target is rarely sitting still waiting for you to get your best shot. I really enjoyed the idea of this thread Jake, because it reminds us that busting clays or hunting birds can have a positive effect on our handgun shooting discipline....
 
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