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I love old shotguns. I have salvaged two of them. This one, an old Stevens, revealed itself to be a beautiful firearm that was hidden under 100 years of normal wear'n'tear.

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It is fully functional. I use only low brass lead shot in it.

The other single-barrel I'm restoring was listed as a parts-donor-only piece of junk at my local gun store. (No pics.) It is a cheap hardware store model from over 100 years ago that I picked it up for $20, and it's slowly coming back to life.

I'm not the only one. Based on what others have said in this thread, there are a number of us who enjoy salvaging those old scatter-guns, and are willing to part with some $$ plus shipping, just for a chance to restore them. List it in the firearms classified forum and see what kind of responses you get.
 

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Wait til some local liberal city has a gun buy-back program. Take it to them and get a couple hundred buckaroos!
I think that the going rate around Chiraq is a 100.00 WalMart card.
 
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This is a Stevens model 54, 410 bore made sometime between 1933 and 1943. I picked up at the gun show. It was missing the bolt and in pretty bad shape. I spent much money at numrich and ebay buying parts that they said fit this gun. Wrong. It took me over a year and a half and more money to finally find the correct parts. Some gunsmiths said I should give up and let it go. Now I have a drawer full of parts that don't fit and more money in it than it ever will be worth. The collectors say it's worth little. Wrong. Some day I will leave it for my Great Grandson. Priceless.
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My Dad's old single shot, it's branded Texas Jack Rabbit and was sold through either Montgomery Wards or Sears I can't recall which, the breech end of the barrel shows a manufacture date of Aug. 11, 1896 making it over 120 years old.
It's a 12ga. with a 31.5 inch barrel My Dad used to call it Long Tom, I inherited it when Dad died and I'll keep it forever
 

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Some People buy them as plinkers. Some as their kids first gun. For rabbit or squirrel gun. Some years later for reason or no they get stuck back in the corner, garage or attics and forgotten about. Worn, scratched and scared. This one is a Marlin Glenfield 15. Made in 1979. In bad shape and ready for the scrap yard, Some Say.
But this one, Ready for another 40 years and more.
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This one is a 1953 Remington 550-1. In looks and wear not in bad shape at all. I found it in a pawn shop at a price more than what it was worth. But, me I had to have it. First trip to the range. Jam every other shot. Took it apart. Inspecting each part as I went. Everything seemed in good shape. Except. Seems someone at some time took this thing apart. Putting it back together they made one bad mistake.
They said it would difficult and costly to fix.
Sell it for parts they said.
All the parts laid spread out on the table for over two weeks as I tried to figure out what to do.
Then one day I decided to try this. And I did. And it worked. And it worked great.
Now I can load it with shorts, longs and LR and it spits them out one after the other in any combination in any order.
When this gun and many many other things were made. And many many years before and some years
after. You wore them out, you broke them AND you Repaired them and started over again. They were made to be repaired and used years after years. Unlike a lot of things today.
If you think about it. These guns of old are really hard to wear down to where they can't be repaired . Just a little maintenance.
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Wait til some local liberal city has a gun buy-back program. Take it to them and get a couple hundred buckaroos!
I was gonna say the same thing, though most don't seem to give more then $100 for a "working" firearm these days.

Keep it, if anything else take the firing pin out and use it for a wall hanger.
I like this idea better though, depending on how rough it is, clean it up as best as you can and hang her on the wall - above a fireplace if ya got one!
 

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I was gonna say the same thing, though most don't seem to give more then $100 for a "working" firearm these days.



I like this idea better though, depending on how rough it is, clean it up as best as you can and hang her on the wall - above a fireplace if ya got one!
There are two reasons that "most don't seem to give more than $100 for a working gun these days."
One is gun Collectors. "The God's of gun ownership" It sometimes seems they like to think of themselves. Say these old guns have litte value because they are not collectible. ????
No wonder it cost me more to fix them up than they are worth.
Two, Is. How many people go out looking to buy a single shot these days. Most are looking for aks, ars, sks and so on down the line. Hunters want more than one shot.
Whoops, There are at least three reasons.
Three. If you do want a single shot. You can gun to walmart and buy a brand new gun made in
Turkey or other for $150. Why pay over $100 for used.
That's why I don't sell or trade gun anymore.
They are worth more than $100 In Memories to me.
 

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This is my "Last" show and tell. But, Really My very first.
I got this Winchester 67a along with a 410 single shot back around 1990 or so for $35. From a co-worker. Remember, $35 back then was more than $35 today. I gave the 410 to my grandson some years back.. His first gun. But, later when I found out he sold it to his dad I tried to buy it back. No he said. "I want to keep it because it belonged to pawpaw. " Bull. He owns a few guns
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, But he would rather watch them rot and rust into thin air than spend five minutes cleaning and oiling. Enough said about him.
Anyway. This was my first gun project. Today I'm thinking of refinishing the stock again. I think I can do a better job than I did the first.
 

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There are two reasons that "most don't seem to give more than $100 for a working gun these days."
One is gun Collectors. "The God's of gun ownership" It sometimes seems they like to think of themselves. Say these old guns have litte value because they are not collectible. ????
No wonder it cost me more to fix them up than they are worth.
Two, Is. How many people go out looking to buy a single shot these days. Most are looking for aks, ars, sks and so on down the line. Hunters want more than one shot.
Whoops, There are at least three reasons.
Three. If you do want a single shot. You can gun to walmart and buy a brand new gun made in
Turkey or other for $150. Why pay over $100 for used.
That's why I don't sell or trade gun anymore.
They are worth more than $100 In Memories to me.
Actually the reason most "buy backs" only give $100 is because they are targeting people who don't want the firearm anymore and don't care a whit about it's value

They also are (typically) "no questions asked", so the bangers can get rid of "dirty" guns and they don't care about the money either....it has nothing to do with the type or # of shots....and has nothing to do with what one can buy a single shot (or any other gun) for new.....You're confusing private sales (and what one can get for their firearm) with gov sanctioned "buy backs"
 

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Actually the reason most "buy backs" only give $100 is because they are targeting people who don't want the firearm

They also are (typically) "no questions asked", so the bangers can get rid of "dirty" guns and they don't care about the money either...
You are correct with the first part. The second is perhaps not exactly accurate as LE supposedly checks the turn in guns for serial numbers or possibly ballistics to learn if they were involved in a prior crime. How deeply they go into that research could be a debate item.

My gut tells me however that "dirty" guns are at the bottom of the Chicago river or the Sanitary & Shipping Canal.
 
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Actually the reason most "buy backs" only give $100 is because they are targeting people who don't want the firearm anymore and don't care a whit about it's value

They also are (typically) "no questions asked", so the bangers can get rid of "dirty" guns and they don't care about the money either....it has nothing to do with the type or # of shots....and has nothing to do with what one can buy a single shot (or any other gun) for new.....You're confusing private sales (and what one can get for their firearm) with gov sanctioned "buy backs"
And I wonder if many of those buy back programs are violating federal law. If they turn around and sell those guns, they need a license to do that. But if they destroy them, maybe not.
 
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And I wonder if many of those buy back programs are violating federal law. If they turn around and sell those guns, they need a license to do that. But if they destroy them, maybe not.
Pretty sure they do a photo op with a paving roller crushing those evil tools.
 

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Did someone say, 'Gun buyback'?

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A little scrap lumber, some pipe, a couple of nails -- you'll have enough cash to snag some bargains.
 

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You are correct with the first part. The second is perhaps not exactly accurate as LE supposedly checks the turn in guns for serial numbers or possibly ballistics to learn if they were involved in a prior crime. How deeply they go into that research could be a debate item.

My gut tells me however that "dirty" guns are at the bottom of the Chicago river or the Sanitary & Shipping Canal.
I suppose it depends on the jurisdiction, I've seen a number of "articles" prior to these buy-backs that have stated they are "no questions asked" - does it mean they don't try and link them to a crime?
No idea, just know what the claim is....

Can't speak to Chicago specifically, though there was a story in the last year (maybe 2?) that talked about how Chicago cops were letting criminals go who handed over guns they had on them when they were stopped (for other offenses) so it wouldn't surprise me if they don't bother there either
 

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I suppose it depends on the jurisdiction, I've seen a number of "articles" prior to these buy-backs that have stated they are "no questions asked" - does it mean they don't try and link them to a crime?
No idea, just know what the claim is....

Can't speak to Chicago specifically, though there was a story in the last year (maybe 2?) that talked about how Chicago cops were letting criminals go who handed over guns they had on them when they were stopped (for other offenses) so it wouldn't surprise me if they don't bother there either
I've seen the disclaimer about not questioning the origin of the gun also. Chiraq has prided itself for many years on the number of guns that they confiscate every year as if that has some relationship to shooting and killing. The buzz was that cops were incentivized for grabbing guns so that they would shake down a citizen, maybe even claim they found drugs on them and offer to let them go if they produced a firearm. They would run home or to a friend's house to find the key to their freedom.
 
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