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Here was farmland, obviously in the family for a long time, the silos tell their story..

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...then...

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...and finally, today...the destruction is complete...

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The American Dream: Homes from Sea to Shining Sea...one big subdivision...where is our food going to come from?

“Only when the last tree has been cut down, the last fish caught, the last river poisoned, only then will we realize that one cannot eat money.”
 

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This has been going on here in Wisconsin and Illinois since before I started high school back in 1969. I have and do travel extensively around these two states.
 
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I get melancholy, watching old buildings disappear. A barn that my dad, grandfather and I* built in 1954 is mostly gone now, from neglect. Many memories of that old barn that will never be forgotten.

*I was 2 years old at the time, but that don't mean I didn't help.
 

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This is what happens when the government can tell you what and when to grow. FDR started it when they bastardized the Interstate Commerce Clause.
 

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If I saw those tanks around here, I'd say they were for crude oil. They look like tanks to me, not silos.

Don't worry. We have plenty of farmland and our farm production is the envy of the world. We can feed all us and then some.
 

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It's a very complex issue and not cut and dried in the least. Agribusiness has snapped up thousands of family farms and with the power of volume purchasing and equipment utilization they have hastened the end of that foundation of American farming. So the family farm must try to expand, coop with the equipment costing hundreds of thousands and hope that their kids have an interest in keeping the tradition alive. Many of those kids went to the city for college and have no interest in working 72-80 hours per week and have their livelihood subject to the weather and market crop and livestock prices.

Add to this urban sprawl and the need for land to plant houses. The farmer who gets up in years, has kids that want to live in the city or is just tired of the struggle crunches the numbers and sees that he can net the same amount of money that he would bust his butt for in the next ten or more years.

Do I begrudge the agribusiness, the builder, the home buyer or the farm seller for their decisions? This is what has made our country the powerhouse economy that we still enjoy today.

Do I also mourn the passing of the family farm? Yes I do, very much.
 

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It's the Climate Change Virus. We're all gonna DIE !!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Around the country, I would guess only half of our farmland is being farmed, and that is the prime farmland, generally meaning with plenty of water for irrigation. During WWII, a lot of land was put into cultivation and after the war, no one wanted to farm it. Lordsburg and Deming N.M. were two areas that grew beans for the war effort.
 

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Here was farmland, obviously in the family for a long time, the silos tell their story..

View attachment 460299

...then...

View attachment 460301

...and finally, today...the destruction is complete...

View attachment 460303

The American Dream: Homes from Sea to Shining Sea...one big subdivision...where is our food going to come from?

“Only when the last tree has been cut down, the last fish caught, the last river poisoned, only then will we realize that one cannot eat money.”
And one cannot live in a silo either.
As farming productivity increases it takes less land to produce the same amount of crops.
Family farms go away. That's sad for the families that sell their farms.
The automobile eliminated the buggy and buggy whip industry too. Sad for the folks who worked in them, but such is progress.
My family's farm that was homesteaded by my great, great grandfather in Missouri was sold when my grandfather died. Nobody in the family wanted to farm it anymore. Just the way it is.
 

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And one cannot live in a silo either.
As farming productivity increases it takes less land to produce the same amount of crops.
Family farms go away. That's sad for the families that sell their farms.
The automobile eliminated the buggy and buggy whip industry too. Sad for the folks who worked in them, but such is progress.
My family's farm that was homesteaded by my great, great grandfather in Missouri was sold when my grandfather died. Nobody in the family wanted to farm it anymore. Just the way it is.
That is twice sad that such a heritage was lost. It's the history of our country as well as of your family. I can't say as I blame them however as the boom/bust nature of the business, long hours and the chances in the economics requires a passion that cannot be created if the seeds are not there. (see what I did there? ;) )
 
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When my wife and I moved from the city to the country some people we knew wondered why we moved so far out in the sticks, instead of just moving outside the city limits, where it would be more convenient to go into town if needed. I told them urban sprawl. I had seen too many places eventually annexed by a growing city for development, and the next thing you know you're little place out in the country has a public housing project next to you and a shopping center across the street. All while having your property taxes increased also. :( Where we live at the township has a minimum 20 acre rule per individual property, so no housing developments or apartments. Most of the residents here are farmers and have much more than 20 acres. The nearest cities will have to annex a lot of miles of farmland before they ever reach where we are at. :)
 

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............................................Many of those kids went to the city for college and have no interest in working 72-80 hours per week and have their livelihood subject to the weather and market crop and livestock prices. ................................................................
It's not their lack of interest or ambition, it's the simple fact that no college kid is going to be intelligent or competent enough to operate something as complex as a hoe or shovel, let alone a tractor. Schooling is not education, they are in fact exact opposites and one tends to negate the other.
 
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I would think that if one wanted to farm it must be a passion for farming. The farmers put in long hours, hope for good weather. and also hope for a good crop. Long story short, farming must be something that you enjoy or don't want to work for somebody else. The family farm will never make you rich.
 

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I would think that if one wanted to farm it must be a passion for farming. The farmers put in long hours, hope for good weather. and also hope for a good crop. Long story short, farming must be something that you enjoy or don't want to work for somebody else. The family farm will never make you rich.
Except with the price per acre when urban sprawl encroaches.
 

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Some farmland and ranch land is being used for wind farms. Property owners collect $$$ without the effort of farming or grazing cattle.
 

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"Who needs dairy farms anyway? If you want milk you just go to the store an buy it!" - Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
 

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I would think that if one wanted to farm it must be a passion for farming. The farmers put in long hours, hope for good weather. and also hope for a good crop. Long story short, farming must be something that you enjoy or don't want to work for somebody else. The family farm will never make you rich.
Farmers possess the independence/self-sufficiency gene, they don't care to be reliant on anyone for anything. The entire world could pretty much go to crap and they'll still survive. It's a rare trait that deserves to be admired.
 

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I moved to a small town in a rural Florida county a bit over 20 years ago. Practically all open land was covered with citrus trees. The only roads through town were two lane with stop lights few an far between. Today much of the citrus groves have been replaced with strip shopping centers and countless and huge residential developments. A six lane highway with plenty of stop lights leads the way in and out of our town. Our little peaceable corner of the earth has been discovered by developers with pockets deep enough to buy out the citrus growers. I miss the smell of the orange blossoms and the sleepy little town that I remember. I would leave here but, we are older now and it is more difficult to pull up our roots than it once was. Besides, this kind of thing is happening all over so, eventually so called progress will catch up with you.
 

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In 1967 at 13yo I went to work for my sisters BIL on his farm. He was raising Black Angus and hogs. Was a small farm, probably only 100 acres. That same year I went along with him and stayed a week at the County Fair where he was showing a few of his Angus. It was a great experience that I will never forget. I worked for him for two years. Then while in High School I went to work for a neighbor on his dairy farm and worked there until my Senior year. I needed more money and girls! That was also a great time in my life and really helped form who I am today. Those cows needed to be milked twice a day every day!

Today both of those farms are long gone and subdivisions have taken their place. The dairy farm was 3rd generation.
 
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