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Are there any differences in the internal workings between Rossi and Taurus medium frames?
 

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As far as I know the firing pins may be different. Rossi has them on the hammer & the new Taurus's use a transfer bar. There probably are more differences that I don't know about.
 

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There are differences such as Smooth 1 has noted. The hammer mounted firing pin is one of those differences from Taurus. According to the web site for Rossi, there is a bar of metal that does intersperse itself between the firing pin and the cartridge while the revolver action is at rest. Cocking or pulling the trigger has the bar move out of the way between the hammer mounted firing pin and the cartridge in the cylinder. At full cock the bar is completely out of the way so the gun can be fired. That way the revolver can be carried at full capacity without the firing pin resting against a live primer and cartridge.Rossi is using newer technology to manufacture the revolvers, but some of designs are old and updated somewhat. In many periodicals the reviewers were surprised that the trigger pulls are smooth,consistant, and light, compareable with any other revolver makers models. In some cases the pull is as smooth as if trigger action job had been done to it. The actions and parts inside the frame for Rossis do work differently than with Taurus revolvers. But are similar enough that one will not be aware of any vagaries between the designs without taking them apart. There are PDF manuals for their revolvers at the Rossi USA web site that have schematics that explain the innards better than typing them all in here. One can do this at the Taurus web site as well. While the designs are old they are not outmoded nor obsolete. Like Taurus, Rossi's manual guards against using +P ammo in their .38 Special revolvers. However, do to the new metalurgy, updates, and manufacturing techniques, the web site has all the .38 Special models +P certified. Since .38 Specials can be shot out of . 357 magnum handguns there is no problem if one gets the magnum version instead of the lesser powered round. Have to scrub out the carbon and residue rings that build up in .357 magnum chambers if 38s are shot through it. We have satisfied Rossi owners who have older models and owners who have the newer updated variants. For the money Rossi's are the bargain revolvers and will give good service for life. There was a jeweler whose shop had 11 blued model 341s scattered at various points in the store and all the employees knew who to shoot them. The day came when two thugs tried to rob the store. One carrying a sawed off double barreled shotgun. In the melee that followed the robbers recieved the worst of the firefight that developed with one criminal dead and the other severly wounded. The criminals shot first. No innocents were hurt. The fight was documented by Mas Ayoob in one of his articles in the last year or so. I would buy two of the model one picks for several reasons. If the first gun is used for defense it will be taken into evidence and may never be returned or returned at a much later date. This leaves the person unarmed when they may need to be armed against threats or intimidation.Or from other violent crimes. Others may have to know how to shoot these revolvers to protect their lives when the man is not home. Even if he is the wife or children may have to be the ones to save the day. It happens more frequently than one might know. Second reason is for those who carry two guns for CCW or police off duty. Similar controls and manual of arms keep things simple when the gun is needed most. Documented evidence shows that a bringing the second gun on line is faster than a tactical or speed reload under most circumstances. Two snubs are easy to hide if done well and thought out. I would rather have two or three guns at a business, at home, or on my person if needed. That should about cover it. Examine a Rossi or Taurus revolver close up and personal like. Either brand will serve many needs. One last thing. Older Rossi models may not have the bar of metal between the firing pin and live rounds. Have to check for that.
 

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There are differences such as Smooth 1 has noted. The hammer mounted firing pin is one of those differences from Taurus. According to the web site for Rossi, there is a bar of metal that does intersperse itself between the firing pin and the cartridge while the revolver action is at rest.
Actually, the hammer block doesn't move in front of the pin, but the hammer. It blocks the hammer from falling all the way. This is the old style Smith and Wesson action. Taurus moved away from that, used to use the hammer block action, then revised to the Ruger style transfer bar mechanism which I much prefer. As far as I know or at least in the last 25 years or so, Taurus has used a floating firing pin rather than a hammer mounted one, though. I rather prefer this, too. I've had an issue with one M971 Rossi snapping a firing pin. Got it fixed, needed proper fitting. I've heard of the firing pin spring in a floating firing pin breaking, but I've never experienced it.

Some time in the early 90s, I think, Taurus went to the transfer bar action. It was an improvement. My 3" M66 has the older firing pin block system and the DA on that gun is rough compared to the DA on my newer 4" gun which has the transfer bar action. That thing is as slick as my old M10 Smith and Wesson which was built back when Smith and Wesson was the best, early 60s. I'm not sure that the transfer bar has anything to do with it, but Taurus guns got a lot better about that time, improving not only trigger function, but fit and finish and QC continually since.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with the Rossi revolvers. I've owned quite a few of 'em, still own two of the more accurate ones. They've all been accurate, just that the two I've kept are amazing. I don't sell firearms that are that accurate. The Rossis do not have the slick DA trigger of the newer Taurus actions, however, but they are serviceable. All my Rossis were Interarms imported guns. The M68 3" .38 I have now I bought for my step dad in '81. It's a well built, accurate little revolver. I inherited it a few years ago.

One exception to the hammer mounted firing pin on Rossi revolvers is the little .22s. My own is a M511 Sportsman, a little J frame size 4" "kit gun". This thing is a shooter, great accuracy. It uses a frame mounted floating firing pin, but still has the hammer block rather than a transfer bar action.
 
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