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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello;

I have a blued mod 80 .38 spec that I bought new about 20 years ago. I recently sent it in to Taurus warranty service to correct a cylinder run out problem where the front face of the cylinder would rub the forcing cone on 2 of the 6 chambers during rotation especially when the gun warmed up after shooting several rounds.

Taurus Warranty Service repaired the gun beautifully and everything worked great when I got it back. Not long afterwards though, I noticed a fore and aft play in the cylinder which measures about .007". I know that that amount doesn't sound like much when just mentioning it off hand, but when you have the gun in hand and can perceptibly see and feel the cylinder move, it really doesn't seem normal. I don't remember if the gun came back from Taurus that way, or the play just developed in the process of shooting it after I received it. The pistol came back with an excellent barrel/cylinder gap when static, but when you push the cylinder rearward the gap increases, although even then it's not bad either.

Before contacting Taurus again, I wanted to get any takes from those of you that have experienced the same thing on similar double action revolvers. Is this movement within the normal operation tolerances of a double action firearm? The gun shoots well as is, but I'm concerned that the constant rearward hammering of the cylinder over a period of time will just make to condition worse. Other double actions I have move in that direction also, but it's so slight that you can hardly detect it.

Thanks for any replies.
 

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If I understand correctly what you have is not side to side cylinder movement, rather fore & aft (front & back) movement (aka: End Shake). This movement will only worsen as you continue to shoot the revolver. I would advise you return the gun to Taurus® to have this problem corrected & to ensure that it remains "in time".
 

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7 thousanths is excessive end shake. The gun should go back. Before you do that, though, make sure the forward screw on the side plate hasn't loosened up. This screw impinges upon the cylinder crane and if it gets loose the crane will have fore to aft play in it. If it loosened up, tighten it with some blue loctite. If you pull that screw out and open the cylinder, you can slide it out of the frame of the gun. The screw's tension on the crane is important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No...Native, that screw is not loose. Guess I'll just have to send it in to Taurus again. Last time I got raped by sending it back to Taurus by UPS. They told me it HAD to go next day air because of security and it cost me about $50. I've gotten smarter in my old age and this time I'm going to send it by USPS which shouldn't be more than about $10 if even that. Go#@am UPS the way they screw you....and you don't even get kissed either. ;D :D

Say badge851, the timing is ok on the gun as it is, it's just the "end shake" you describe that's a problem. Thanks for the info.
 

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Before you ship please check the regs. Here's what Gunbroker.com has to say:


Firearms Shipping Guide


Overview
This page provides information about Federal Laws, step that must be followed, and notes on using specific shippers when shipping firearms. This page is oriented toward the seller of an item. If you need information about how to buy a firearm through GunBroker.com, please refer to our Buyer's Tutorial.

This page contains information oriented toward persons shipping firearms within the United States. For sellers located outside the United States, please see our Import / Export Page.

Shipping Legalities
Federal Law requires that all modern firearms be shipped only to a holder of a valid Federal Firearms License (FFL). The recipient must be have an FFL; however the sender is not required to have one. Any person who is legally allowed to own a firearm is legally allowed to ship it to an FFL holder for any legal purpose (including sale or resale).

Here is exactly what the ATF 'Federal Firearms Regulations Reference Guide' (ATF P 5300.4) says:
(B9) May a nonlicensee ship a firearm by carrier?
A nonlicensee may ship a firearm by carrier to a resident of his or her own state or to a licensee in any state. A common or contract carrier must be used to ship a handgun. In addition, Federal law requires that the carrier be notified that the shipment contains a firearm and prohibits common or contract carriers from requiring or causing any label to be placed on any package indicating that it contains a firearm. [18 U. S. C. 922( a)( 2)( A) and 922( e), 27 CFR 178.31]

B8) May a nonlicensee ship a firearm through the U. S. Postal Service? [Back]
A nonlicensee may mail a shotgun or rifle to a resident of his or her own state or to a licensee in any state. Handguns are not mailable. A common or contract carrier must be used to ship a handgun. A nonlicensee may not transfer any firearm to a nonlicensed resident of another state. The Postal Service recommends that longguns be sent by registered mail and that no marking of any kind which would indicate the nature of the contents be placed on the outside of any parcel containing firearms.

Shipment by Unlicensed Persons
Any shipper who does not have a Federal Firearms License (FFL) is considered to be an 'unlicensed person'. This section contains information on how unlicensed persons can ship firearms. If you have an FFL, please skip to the next section for shipping suggestions.

The most important thing to know is that you must only ship guns to a licensed dealer. If the buyer is not a licensed dealer, he will have to make arrangements with a dealer in his state to ship the item to.

Before you ship a gun, the buyer must fax or mail you a copy of the dealer's signed FFL license. You can only ship the gun to the address on the license. You must inform the carrier that the package contains a firearm. Of course, the firearm cannot be shipped loaded; ammunition may not be shipped in the same box. You should take the copy of the signed FFL with you when you take the item to be shipped in case the shipper wishes to see it.

.......................

Notes on specific shippers:

US Mail: An unlicensed person can ship a rifle or shotgun by US Mail. Unlicensed persons cannot ship a handgun by US Mail. Postal regulations allow the Post Office to open your package for inspection. Ammunition cannot be shipped by US Mail. You can search the US Post Offer Postal Explorer site for specific USPS regulations regarding firearms and ammunition.

FedEx: FedEx will only ship firearms via their Priority Overnight service. Ammunition must be shipped as dangerous goods.

UPS: UPS will accept handgun shipments by Next Day Air only. Rifles and shotguns can be shipped by UPS ground service. UPS will accept shipments of ammunition. UPS does not allow shipment of firearms FROM an unlicensed person (even to an FFL), unless the stated reason for the firearm shipment is for repair or modifications.


http://www.gunbroker.com/Support/SupportFAQView.asp?FAQID=1118&NoCount=1

I chose to ship handguns via Fed-Ex. Its not that I think they are any cheaper (I haven't checked) its that UPS posted their facilities No Guns per Mn State law & Fed-Ex didn't. A bonus is that Fed-Ex is easier to get to for me.

Steelheart
 
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