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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished cleaning my Taurus Model 66 .357 magnum revolver. I saw what appears to be a "split" or crack in the force cone at the bottom.

This is something new; I always clean my firearms after every trip to the range, so I would have seen it before if it was there.

Should I be concerned?

I think I should be...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll give it a try in a bit, using my wonderful phone and trying to get enough light on it.

There really is little to see — just a very narrow split, just wide enough to stick my finger nail into it...
 

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A split forcing cone is serious, especially if your using magnum ammo. Send it in and get it repaired.
Right!?! Don't shoot the thing, get it fixed. Replacing, or waiting the serious time for Taurus to fix it, is much easier than replacing your fingers.
 

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yes be concerned and send it too Taurus, just box it up and send it, it may take a couple months to get it back so check the lock-up and timing etc, because they will not check that for you, they will only fix what you tell them.

I'm very happy after getting my .357 6.5" tracker back, they fixed everything and I bought the gun used for 320$, took about 6 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Right!?! Don't shoot the thing, get it fixed. Replacing, or waiting the serious time for Taurus to fix it, is much easier than replacing your fingers.
You can say that again! That was my opinion as well, I just wanted to see what others thought of it.

It is a good idea for all of us to keep a sharp eye out for defects as we continue to shoot our firearms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah...one more GOOD reason to always clean your guns after firing. I know some don't, but here is a perfect example of why you should.

I have put a lot of rounds through it. I was just trying to make an estimate. The gun is about 10 years old. I go to the range about once a month and shoot about 100 rounds each time. I have three other guns I shoot, but still — I shoot htis one the most.

My guess is — maybe 8,000 rounds? The math is, 100 rds, maybe 8 times a year, = 800 rounds x 10 years = 8,000

And I think that number is low.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Over pressure is surprising. Most of the ammo I shoot is .38 Special. Just a few .357 magnum rounds at each outing.

I would say I need a new barrel. I can't see how any repair could be permanent?
 

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Over pressure is surprising. Most of the ammo I shoot is .38 Special. Just a few .357 magnum rounds at each outing.

I would say I need a new barrel. I can't see how any repair could be permanent?
Yes, your Revolver will need to be rebarreled and Taurus should do it. Go to the Website, get a Repair Ticket going, and send it in, pronto!
 
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Guys, most of you know I new to revolvers so I'm kind of hi-jacking here, if that cone did split completely what would be the effects the next shot?
 

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Guys, most of you know I new to revolvers so I'm kind of hi-jacking here, if that cone did split completely what would be the effects the next shot?
It's hard to say for sure, pressure is a funny thing. It may be fine for hundreds of rounds, or it may blow on the next one. Never risk it once found.

I suspect it may have started as a very small blemish/crack/scratch, then gas cutting did most the damage we see now.
 

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I know of at least one incident where a split forcing cone blew out sending shrapnel into the shooters hand and injuring a bystander standing next to him. Neither person was seriously injured but the shooter required a few stitches to one finger. Seem he knew the forcing cone was split but on advice from his friends he kept shooting it. This was a S&W Mod 19 so it can happen to any of them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I haven't been shooting anything unusual, just factory ammo. Mostly .38 Special, and a few .357 Mag rounds.

This last time at the range, I was finishing up with the last 14 rounds from a box if Sig Sauer .357 Magnum.

I admit, those rounds produce a dramatic muzzle blast — more so than most other .357 rounds I have fired.

The only thing similar was a box of Blazer brass I went through a couple years ago. That produced such a flame from the muzzle that others at the range came over and asked what the &*/## was I shooting.

I try to stay away from anything that seems too exotic. I will never shoot Sig Sauer .357 Magnum rounds again, just to be on the safe side.
 

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You should not have to worry about factory ammo being too hot for a modern revolver.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You should not have to worry about factory ammo being too hot for a modern revolver.
I think that is right.

I did a little more research after my last post, and found a chat room where a guy who owned a Smith and Wesson Model 686 had EXACTLY the same thing happen. The common place is the 6 o'clock position on the force cone. Just like mine. He had probably put 10,000 rounds through his, mostly .38 Special as I did, with just a few .357 Mag rounds time to time.

Truth is, I'm low balling the number I've fired with mine. !0 - 12,000 rounds is definitely possible.

Apparently this kind of damage is inevitable in all revolvers, just a matter of the number of rounds fired. it is caused by the blast of hot gas hitting and "cutting" the force cone.

If the frame is split also, then it cannot be fixed. If it is only the barrel, it can be, assuming the gun is of modern enough vintage.

The guy with the Smith had a problem, in that that particular model was apparently too old; S&W agreed to fix it if he could buy an old barrel somewhere. He did, and they fixed it.
 
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I've seen a few K frame Smith with cracked forcing cones but never an L frame. The L frame was designed because of problems shooting a steady diet of magnum ammo.
 
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