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I have a Seagate Barracuda 1000GB hard drive that was removed from a crashed computer. I'm going to install it into an external hard drive case and use it for a backup to my current desktop computer. I have a couple of questions before I get started.

First: The registry on this hard drive was somehow corrupted, and a computer store was unable to fix it. It has the entire operating system still on it, plus whatever virus/Trojan/nasty bug infected it to begin with. Should I go to, oh say, Best Buy, buy a hard drive case with cable, then have them install and connect the HDD in the case, and then reformat the hard drive? My concern is that I've not done this before, and I don't want to take ANY chance of it corrupting my desktop if I do it myself. What is the best way to safely reformat the old HDD?

case.jpg

Second: Is there any one brand of HDD external drive case better than the others, or are they mostly the same thing? By the way, my HDD has a SATA drive serial connector - I already know about getting the right kind of case.

connectors.jpg

Any advice and information greatly appreciated.
 

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Okay, I have to do this to my wife's laptop. Here is what I'm planning to do. First, I will buy a new hard drive, and I'm leaning toward a SSD drive as a replacement. I'll put the replacement drive into a USB external unit and then boot into Windows and use a mirroring drive software to mirror the old drive to the new drive. After that, I will remove the old drive, and put in the new SSD drive, and it should come up just like the old drive, same programs installed, icons on your desktop, everything. The mirroring software is sometimes on your new drive. If not, you'll need a good mirroring software to do that. There are several out there, and probably some free ones too, but I've not had a lot of experience doing this so I'm not sure what is superior and what is not. After that works, I will put the old drive into the USB external unit and plug that into the computer, and re-format the drive using Windows.

You really shouldn't need Best Buy or whoever to put the drive into the external unit. You should see the SATA plug, and the power plug. You can't mix them up. Plug them into their respective interfaces and voila - thats pretty much it.

If mirroring is out, in other words if the old hard drive's registry is truly whacked and can't be saved, then you'll need to install fresh Windows on your new hard drive, then bring up the old hard drive in the USB external case and copy over what you want. Any programs, you'll need to re-install but you should be able to copy your data files over, then re-format the old drive using Windows whenever you want.
 
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One thing I didn't say about SSD drives. They are pretty much built like thumb drives, they're not standard hard drives at all in the sense of a metallic disk spinning, and an arm reading data. They read the data kinda like thumb drive technology and thus they generally are much faster than a standard hard drive. The drawback is, that whenever they do konk out, they are GONE. I mean, no recovery at all. If that is a deal killer for you, then you should get a regular hard drive.
 
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Get a cheap external enclosure.
Download Darik's Boot and nuke and put it on a thumbdrive
remove your existing HD
connect the Terabyte drive to the computer and boot off the thumbdrive.
Nuke the drive completely, I.E, security wipe it
That will give you a known good platform so that even if there's a rootkit virus on that drive, it won't be afterwards.
Connect your original drive and put the 1TB drive in the enclosure and Mirror the internal drive to the external.
Test the mirrored drive by booting to it.
If it passes, move it OFF SITE (take it to work or something).

Darik's boot and nuke D/L:
https://dban.org/
 
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I would run "fdisk" or "gparted" on the drive first and let it build a new allocation table. Then use the Linux "dd" command VERY carefully. Read a lot about it first and write down EXACTLY what you want to type before you type it. Fill the drive with "0"s and "1"s. Then shut down the drive. Restart the drive, run fdisk or gparted command again and build another new allocation table. Then fill it again with 0's and 1's, then delete everything again. Shut down the drive. Restart and build a new allocation table one last time. You should be clean at this point.

I'm old school. Old enough I used to write my own head and sector tables for MFM and RLL drives many years ago. The above should work. I would still check it for a virus after, just to be sure. Some Worms are nasty business.
My two cents.
 

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I've purchased Western Digital drives all my life and never had a problem with any of them. In a moment of weakness (and cheapness) I've purchased 4 Seagate drives over the years and 3 of them have had total failures. I would not waste money buying an enclosure for a poor drive, when a WD External drive of the same size (or larger) could probably be had for very little more money.

However, if you're set on doing it, download the UBCD (Ultimate Boot CD). This is a very handy CD that boots itself with Linux and has all kinds of utilities on it, some of which are disk utilities. Burn that UBCD image to a CD and then boot it before attaching your (old) new external drive. This way your real computer's OS never sees that drive before you can format it. Use the UBCD to format that new drive. There's probably some NSA-style disk clearing software on the UBCD if I remember, and it will wipe everything as if you're a former First Lady.

Good luck and let us know how it goes!
 

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That HDD you have there is an IDE drive, meaning that you will have a hard time finding a housing to put it in locally, for starters (new PC's don't even have those connections anymore) and even on amazon they are more than half the price of this new 2TB (2000GB) external drive:


https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-Portable-External-Hard-Drive/dp/B07CRG94G3/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=A2R4N7JCTX75&keywords=2tb+external+hard+drive&qid=1568722234&sprefix=2tb+exter%2Caps%2C161&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExWVI3WTFWMlFLVUxNJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMzcwMTAyM0NIRDNOWjBOT0xDSyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwNTIzMTMwRThFV001WktKSTBCJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==


as to your backup issue, I purchased Acronis a while back. It's actual backup software that lets you take incremental backups, set a backup schedule, create a recovery boot thumb-drive / CD / DVD that you could restore your entire system from in case of emergency.
 
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You can probably get a new WD My Book external HD for less than having it done if you are unsure about doing it yourself. There are other brands. I have two Western Digitals.
Rather than mess with a corrupted/diseased hard drive I would spend $50.00 on this. If you are determined to use the old hard drive you need to format it (maybe 3 or 4 times) to wipe it clean, then set int up for the type of file system, NTFS or FAT32, needed for your computer.

https://www.amazon.com/Bipra-Extern...=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B005DZRWEE
I'm in this camp...an enclosure will be 10-15 bucks. A new 500g -1TB HDD can run 50-80 bucks...

Problems trying to create a new HDD from an older one...Priceless.
 

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You are probably better off getting a new external drive, that way you don't have to worry about the interface. If you still want to wipe it, the best idea I have read so far is to use a Linux based drive recovery/maintenance OS on a USB to clean the drive. It is highly unlikely that any trojan, worm or virus will be able to infect that Linux OS, and being Linux you can format and wipe that drive several different ways to completely wipe it. Then again Hillary recommends BleachBit. Clonezilla has a new release and Gparted is an old distro that works well.

COSTCO and SAMS usually have cheap external drives at good prices.
 

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If all you want to do is reformat it, you can probably do that yourself.
If you want to try and retrieve any data on it before you reformat it, you'll want to take it to a professional data retrieval shop.
They can get stuff that ordinary computer stores cannot.
 

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That is one OLD drive. Shame to put money and work into it to have it die shortly.

I'd just bite the bullet and grab a new one. You'll have better technology and something faster.
Nice thing about the solid state drives versus the old spinning disk, you drop the solid state
and 99% chance it'll be fine. They're not delicate the like spinning disks are.

I've got an issue throwing out old computer stuff. Stuff really still works but I finally have to
honestly look at something and admit there is no practical application for it.

All the Best,
D. White
 
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You can probably get a new WD My Book external HD for less than having it done if you are unsure about doing it yourself. There are other brands. I have two Western Digitals.
That is one OLD drive. Shame to put money and work into it to have it die shortly.

I'd just bite the bullet and grab a new one. You'll have better technology and something faster.
Nice thing about the solid state drives versus the old spinning disk, you drop the solid state
and 99% chance it'll be fine. They're not delicate the like spinning disks are.

I've got an issue throwing out old computer stuff. Stuff really still works but I finally have to
honestly look at something and admit there is no practical application for it.

All the Best,
D. White
Tell me about THAT! I have a NIB DVD ROM 16x drive that I bought not seeing that it wasn't R/W. Also a bunch of 3.5 floppies...NIB:rolleyes:
 

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Tell me about THAT! I have a NIB DVD ROM 16x drive that I bought not seeing that it wasn't R/W. Also a bunch of 3.5 floppies...NIB:rolleyes:
Right there with you.

Not sure what the source code is for but I hate to get rid of it.

floppies.jpg

All the Best,
D. White
 

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IDE Drive??? :r_c: :eek2: There are some things that should be passed on and allowed to go.

One thing I didn't say about SSD drives. They are pretty much built like thumb drives, they're not standard hard drives at all in the sense of a metallic disk spinning, and an arm reading data. They read the data kinda like thumb drive technology and thus they generally are much faster than a standard hard drive. The drawback is, that whenever they do konk out, they are GONE. I mean, no recovery at all. If that is a deal killer for you, then you should get a regular hard drive.
There is a way around that. Typically, what I do is install the Operating System on an SSD, typically a 180 or 240 GB Drive, and install a secondary storage Drive that is a one or two terrabyte conventional mechanical Hard Drive. Most Tower PC's can have more than one Drive installed. Simply copy/store Documents, Music, Pictures, and Video on the Storage Drive. The conventional Hard Drive will last a long time, only being used for Storage and not the Operating System.

On a Laptop, installing a secondary storage drive usually involves sacrificing the CD/DVD Drive area, but not always. It's often best to use an External Storage Drive or Flash/Thumb Drives for Laptops, for Data you would like to keep.
On Laptops, I always install an SSD for the Primary/Operating System/C Drive.
 
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