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Not loading anything but a question to those that do, I have contemplated reloading but there are so many variables as do you use new brass, how do you collect just your brass at the range to reuse, the places I shoot collect the brass seems like as soon as it hits the ground and they resell it to their special customers. I do not not know even how to get started I do watch a lot of YouTube videos and it does not seem that hard to grasp as long as you can follow the steps in the reloading manuals but buying the equipment seem daunting not know what you actually need and don't need to get started.
 

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I moved your post to start a new thread for you. This will generate a lot of advice and I'll start with the suggestion of getting a copy of The ABC's Of Reloading...https://www.amazon.com/ABCs-Reloading-Definitive-Novice-Expert-ebook/dp/B004GUSBP6

or the Lee book...Modern Reloading Lee Precision Modern Reloading Second Edition Book By Richard Lee

The Lee book is what I started with. Buy a Lee Precision Classic Turret press in kit form that will give you the best bang for your buck, an extra turret and die set for every caliber you'll want to load. Tell your range that you want to take your property, your empty brass, home with you and see if they will sell you additional. Once fired brass is readily available on-line also.

The turret press will let you load anything from .380 Auto to rifle bottlenecked cases.
 

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I got my start in reloading with one of these back in the 60s.
https://leeprecision.com/reloading-kits/lee-loader-pistol/
357 to be precise. Actually almost everything for loading a box of shells will fit into a 50 caliber ammo can (except powder and rubber/plastic mallet). Now-a-days I'd use a dead fall hammer instead.
I would get one of these also.
https://leeprecision.com/priming-tool-kit.html
Once you learn the basics and decide if you want to continue reloading then you can upgrade to the more expensive press and everything else needed to reload your own ammo.

Hint, about reclaiming your fired cases, use a felt pen and mark them before you shoot them.

I wouldn't go to an indoor shooting range or any range, that steals my fired cases.
 

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Czechbikr gave you good advice. Getting started with a good manual is the way to go. I got started many years ago with a Lyman manual and reloading equipment package. Most of the packages sold by Lee, Lyman, Hornady, and RCBS will have everything that you need to get you started. Although I have been a reloader for nearly forty years, I am now using a Lee Classic turret press for most of my reloading. It ispeeds up the loading process and allows you to quickly change to another caliber by simply changing turrets.
 

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start collecting and/or buying brass. If the current range you use prohibits you from reclaiming brass you lawfully own, it's time to find a new range. Reloading is just another phase of the shooting sport. You really don't save money, you just shoot a lot more for the same cost of factory rounds.
 

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It would help to know what cartridge you wish to reload.

The bare minimum required is just one of the aforementioned Lee Loaders. However these are extremely limited. You can run into problems if you don't use brass that was fired in your gun, and the options for variations in components (bullet and powder) are few.

The bare minimum to get setup with a press and standard dies is about $130. Attached is a list that will let you load one caliber of your choice. If you're not doing 9mm you'd buy a different die set that the one listed.

Every item in the list can be upgraded. But this right here will produce ammo as good as anything. More money mostly buys you more speed, not more quality. With a very few exceptions. I put this together for a friend so I thought I'd share it. Lee tends to be the least expensive equipment. These are the two least expensive Lee distubutors:

https://fsreloading.com/
https://www.titanreloading.com/

screenshot-fsreloading.com-2018.08.14-08-09-15.jpg
 

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Czechbikr, has the plan I started with. A word of warning, I started with 9mm then it was 380 and 38spl/357, all similar bullet diameters. Then it exploded into most all pistol calibers.

I have managed to control myself in the rifle calibers, 5.56 and 7.62 but it is with extreme difficulty.

Oh wait ... there is the 22 hornet .... and the 22-250.

Oh and the 30-06 and 30-30. Ah, the 30-30 reminded me of the lever guns

Aaarrruuugggg DON'T TELL MY WIFE !!!!!!!!
 

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Czechbikr, has the plan I started with. A word of warning, I started with 9mm then it was 380 and 38spl/357, all similar bullet diameters. Then it exploded into most all pistol calibers.

I have managed to control myself in the rifle calibers, 5.56 and 7.62 but it is with extreme difficulty.

Oh wait ... there is the 22 hornet .... and the 22-250.

Oh and the 30-06 and 30-30. Ah, the 30-30 reminded me of the lever guns

Aaarrruuugggg DON'T TELL MY WIFE !!!!!!!!
The hobby is very addicting. Same as him, I started thinking I'd only do .308 and 9mm. Now I do them, 45LC, .223, 40S&W, 38/357,... I'm sure I'm missing something.

You can save a lot of money doing it but it usually takes some time because, once you start, it's hard to stop and are not shy of unusual or normally expensive to shoot calibers anymore. I load match grade ammo for the .308 at milsurp level cost or less.

I started with this kit:

https://www.cabelas.com/product/sho...reech-lock-challenger-kit/731940.uts?slotId=6

Knowing what I know now, I would've started with a turret kit like this:

https://www.cabelas.com/product/sho...classic-turret-press-kit/1374275.uts?slotId=2

Those kits will be great for learning the ropes and give you everything you need except dies. Lee makes excellent products for cheaper than some other guys. Once you learn the steps and get proficient with it, you can get into more automated equipment like a progressive. I do not suggest starting with a progressive!
 

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I will add that if you are a good bargain hunter much of everything can be found used on ebay for pennies on the dollar. Press, scale, dies, measures, books.
 

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Czechbikr, has the plan I started with. A word of warning, I started with 9mm then it was 380 and 38spl/357, all similar bullet diameters. Then it exploded into most all pistol calibers.

I have managed to control myself in the rifle calibers, 5.56 and 7.62 but it is with extreme difficulty.

Oh wait ... there is the 22 hornet .... and the 22-250.

Oh and the 30-06 and 30-30. Ah, the 30-30 reminded me of the lever guns

Aaarrruuugggg DON'T TELL MY WIFE !!!!!!!!
It comes down to when you get the urge to buy a new or different gun you begin to waver on whether you want to add a new caliber that you do not already load for. Then when you decide that you want to go ahead, you not only look at the cost of the gun but also the dies, another turret to set them in, brass, projectiles, and so on. The cost of the equipment however will be amortized by your savings and you have a new hobby on top of that.

The hobby is very addicting. Same as him, I started thinking I'd only do .308 and 9mm. Now I do them, 45LC, .223, 40S&W, 38/357,... I'm sure I'm missing something.

You can save a lot of money doing it but it usually takes some time because, once you start, it's hard to stop and are not shy of unusual or normally expensive to shoot calibers anymore. I load match grade ammo for the .308 at milsurp level cost or less.

I started with this kit:

https://www.cabelas.com/product/sho...reech-lock-challenger-kit/731940.uts?slotId=6

Knowing what I know now, I would've started with a turret kit like this:

https://www.cabelas.com/product/sho...classic-turret-press-kit/1374275.uts?slotId=2

Those kits will be great for learning the ropes and give you everything you need except dies. Lee makes excellent products for cheaper than some other guys. Once you learn the steps and get proficient with it, you can get into more automated equipment like a progressive. I do not suggest starting with a progressive!
I strongly recommend the turret style press even for beginners. You can use it like a Single Stage (perform one operation on each case, place in a rack and then do the next operation once that is done) or as the turret is designed to leave the case in the shell holder and rotate the dies to complete each function. Look for single stage loading and turret operation on YouTube.

With the turret press you can comfortable produce a few thousand rounds per month to satisfy even a competition shooter (as long as they don't get carried away with events and practice ;) ) Figure a comfortable rate of 145-165 rounds per hour.

That Classic Turret kit looks really good now since they are including the Auto Drum which is a 55.00 item by itself.
 

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Single stage loading..he says he does 50 in an hour!


Here's the Turret Press operation:

 

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It comes down to when you get the urge to buy a new or different gun you begin to waver on whether you want to add a new caliber that you do not already load for. Then when you decide that you want to go ahead, you not only look at the cost of the gun but also the dies, another turret to set them in, brass, projectiles, and so on. The cost of the equipment however will be amortized by your savings and you have a new hobby on top of that.



I strongly recommend the turret style press even for beginners. You can use it like a Single Stage (perform one operation on each case, place in a rack and then do the next operation once that is done) or as the turret is designed to leave the case in the shell holder and rotate the dies to complete each function. Look for single stage loading and turret operation on YouTube.

With the turret press you can comfortable produce a few thousand rounds per month to satisfy even a competition shooter (as long as they don't get carried away with events and practice ;) ) Figure a comfortable rate of 145-165 rounds per hour.

That Classic Turret kit looks really good now since they are including the Auto Drum which is a 55.00 item by itself.
I agree with everything here. I would add that, if I started with a turret rather than single stage, I probably wouldn't have felt the need to get a progressive.
 

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I agree with everything here. I would add that, if I started with a turret rather than single stage, I probably wouldn't have felt the need to get a progressive.
I suspect that the vast majority of shooters would meet their ammo needs with a Classic Turret and have the benefit of faster caliber changes and lower initial cost. I load everything from .380 Auto to 45-70 Government on mine, to include five pistol calibers, .223, 300 BLK and 32 Winchester Special.
 

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I suspect that the vast majority of shooters would meet their ammo needs with a Classic Turret and have the benefit of faster caliber changes and lower initial cost. I load everything from .380 Auto to 45-70 Government on mine, to include five pistol calibers, .223, 300 BLK and 32 Winchester Special.
^^^^^^ THIS ^^^^^^

Started with and still using the Lee Turret. I have a progressive, but until I find THE round for THAT barrel, I'm still on the Turret.
 
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Lee's latest offerings.



Any one of these presses can be purchased new for less than $130.00.. The Value turret press is about $86.00 plush shipping from Titan Reloading.

Bare minimums to reload pistol;
Press, dies
Scale
Powder dippers, funnel
calipers
manuals

Not a necessity but a kinetic bullet pullet comes in handy.

Brass, primers, powders and bullets!
 
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Not loading anything but a question to those that do, I have contemplated reloading but there are so many variables as do you use new brass, how do you collect just your brass at the range to reuse, the places I shoot collect the brass seems like as soon as it hits the ground and they resell it to their special customers. I do not not know even how to get started I do watch a lot of YouTube videos and it does not seem that hard to grasp as long as you can follow the steps in the reloading manuals but buying the equipment seem daunting not know what you actually need and don't need to get started.
I generally tell friends to expect to pay about 400 bucks to get into reloading.
this covers the basics, press (or press kit), dies, bullet puller, powder measure, scale, loading blocks, caliper, primer pocket cleaner , chamfer tool, tumbler.
there may be a few other items but this covers most of it except for actual components like primers, powder, brass.
the bets place to learn is from someone that loads already, that the best route as longa s they have some experience in loading.
the big thing to do is get a good reloading manual and read it, let it sit a couple of days and read it again, just the methods not the load data.
just remember that YOU are the only safety/ quality control person in the reloading scheme, there is no one looking over YOUR shoulder or got your back IF you make a mistake.
the object should always be safety- quality , not quantity.
it is time consuming so IF you don't have the time then don't try reloading.
 

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Okay - This is a topic that I've spent a LOT of time on and have worked with an array of products.

I tend to stick with Lee products after having worked with friends on their gadgets (a Dillon 550, a Hornady Progressive press, and an RCBS single stage and progressive press) because they all have their own little idiosyncrasies and all are much more expensive than the Lee comparable product.

Lee products are not perfect, but neither are the others. Lee products are, IMO, not imperfect enough to warrant the gigantic price jump to the next best model (again, just an educated opinion, here :))

Equipment you'll need:
1- L
ee 4 hole turret press kit - pretty much everything you need besides dies and it has the awesome Lee AutoDrum powder measure)
2. The die set for the cartridge you are loading for
3. Not necessary but some MTM ammo boxes are helpful and cheap
4. Strongly recommend a digital scale (and this lil' guy right here works great!)
5. Eventually a tumbler (Frankford Arsenal dry tumbler) and media separator


My recommendation, for a new reloader from a fairly new reloader (only been at it about 4 years...but have loaded over 12,000 rounds in that time) is first, to echo my wiser predecessors in this thread and direct you to any one of dozens of good manuals out there. The ABC's or Reloading is a great place to start, as is YouTube (next best thing to a personal tutor if you get the right set of videos!)

Next is to pick one caliber that you intend to reload, then decide which powder you would need.

Range brass is almost always Okay but if you want to bypass the hunting and scrutinizing, there are lots of places that sell "once fired" brass very inexpensively (depending on Cartridge)

I would recommend either Power Pistol or BE-86 from Alliant as they are both very versatile and provide enough volume that double charging will be very difficult. Once you become comfortable with the process, you can start researching purpose oriented powders and play around with charge weights.

Then a bullet weight and type is needed.

If you are just plinking around, I would direct you to American Reloading for some inexpensive pulled bullets or to SNS Casting for HiTek coated bullets (these do require you to flare the case mouth of your brass a little more than for jacketed bullets).

Finally, you'll need primers :)
 
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Look at it this way. It takes me about 20 minutes to go through 50 rounds at the range (I shoot slowly and deliberately). That's 150 rounds an hour. If I can only load 50 rounds an hour, I'd have to load three hours for every hour I shoot. You're spending more time reloading than shooting. Which is fine if your primary hobby is reloading. On my Dillon, I can load 300 rounds an hour, or about twice as fast as I shoot. I reload because it's the only way I can afford to shoot as much as I do. I prefer it not to be my primary activity.

With the Dillon I can crank off 1,000 rounds before lunch on a rainy Saturday. That lasts me a while. I do tend to load up in batches rather than as I go.

Loading 1,000 rounds on a single stage would probably kill me with boredom. But like I said, the quality is the same, just the production rate goes up.
 

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Look at it this way. It takes me about 20 minutes to go through 50 rounds at the range (I shoot slowly and deliberately). That's 150 rounds an hour. If I can only load 50 rounds an hour, I'd have to load three hours for every hour I shoot. You're spending more time reloading than shooting. Which is fine if your primary hobby is reloading. On my Dillon, I can load 300 rounds an hour, or about twice as fast as I shoot. I reload because it's the only way I can afford to shoot as much as I do. I prefer it not to be my primary activity.

With the Dillon I can crank off 1,000 rounds before lunch on a rainy Saturday. That lasts me a while. I do tend to load up in batches rather than as I go.

Loading 1,000 rounds on a single stage would probably kill me with boredom. But like I said, the quality is the same, just the production rate goes up.
I probably shoot the same per hour at the range. The 50 rounds per hour is what the guy doing the Single Stage says he does. The guy with the Turret Press claims 200+ per hour, which is a reasonable number IMO with some experience. It is a simple matter to crank 150 per hour which translates into an hour loading for an hour's shooting.

Fiends of mine who are top tier with USPSA shoot 10,000 per month. Those are the guys who need to spend the 1,000.00 and up for their reloading gear. The 350.00 that I spent was paid off years ago.
 

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So I must be a pregnant reloader because I load for 2! Me and the Wife. I've stated before that even on my progressive press I'm only loading about 150 per hour. No Hurry, No Worry. I do check every round as it is coming off the press and then put into an ammo box. When the box is full a label is made.
 
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