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Was setting up to load some 327 Magnum cartridges today using Rainier 100 gr. plated FP bullets. Was going to run them at near max pressure/velocity using surplus WC-820 Powder with a burn rate same as Accurate #9. Decided to set the bullets out as far as the cylinder would allow. Thinking this load would be good to use in my new Ruger Single 7 I got a factory round and checked to see where it sat in the chamber of the Ruger cylinder. I hadn't paid much attention to this before. I was really surprised when the cartridge was just a few thousandths inside the cylinder. That meant that I couldn't seat the bullet in my hand loads out enough to make a difference in pressure. Puzzled, I decided to take a look at my Taurus 327 and my Charter Arms 327. I was surprised to find that both of them have cylinder much longer than the Ruger. I can load heavier for the Taurus and the CA than I can the Ruger and keep the pressures from peaking quite so quickly. The Taurus and CA cylinder measures 1.58" long; the Ruger cylinder is only 1.45" long. .013" difference. In hand loads that can make a big difference in pressure. Had thought I might sell the CA; but in light of this finding today I'm inclined to keep it.
Just interesting; that's all.
 

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That is interesting, but not surprising on the Single Seven. Usually Rugers have long cylinders, my Super Blackhawk has very long cylinders allowing me to load heavier bullets for it than other .44 magnums. My Security Six also has long cylinders great for 200 grain .357 handloads that are a tad over length.

My guess is that in the case of the Single Seven is that it is due to the small size of that particular frame and that a .327 Blackhawk, GP100, or even and SP101 would have longer cylinders. It is my understanding that Ruger was barely able to get the .327 to fit in the Single Seven frame. If you think about it that frame size was originally designed for rimfire chamberings.
 

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Several others that reload and bought the Single Seven have mentioned this when we were talking. I opted to build a six shot using a Single Six 32 H&R take off barrel and cylinder from a friend. The rechambered cylinder in a converted single six works with factory length .327's. It has caused me to look at building a 5 or 6 shot custom on a flat top black hawk frame. The cylinder and window would allow 120 grain and heavier bullets. I will use 32 H&R brass for the heavier bullets with lighter loads in the Single Six conversion. The 327 and 30 carbine from handgun length barrels are running very close.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I had never used a Single Six. 22 revolvers aren't of interest to me, much. I like the Single 7 but I will keep the CA also.
 
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Was setting up to load some 327 Magnum cartridges today using Rainier 100 gr. plated FP bullets. Was going to run them at near max pressure/velocity using surplus WC-820 Powder with a burn rate same as Accurate #9. Decided to set the bullets out as far as the cylinder would allow. Thinking this load would be good to use in my new Ruger Single 7 I got a factory round and checked to see where it sat in the chamber of the Ruger cylinder. I hadn't paid much attention to this before. I was really surprised when the cartridge was just a few thousandths inside the cylinder. That meant that I couldn't seat the bullet in my hand loads out enough to make a difference in pressure. Puzzled, I decided to take a look at my Taurus 327 and my Charter Arms 327. I was surprised to find that both of them have cylinder much longer than the Ruger. I can load heavier for the Taurus and the CA than I can the Ruger and keep the pressures from peaking quite so quickly. The Taurus and CA cylinder measures 1.58" long; the Ruger cylinder is only 1.45" long. .013" difference. In hand loads that can make a big difference in pressure. Had thought I might sell the CA; but in light of this finding today I'm inclined to keep it.
Just interesting; that's all.
Very interesting, I just pulled out my Ruger New Blackhawk in .327 and the cylinder is 1.64"
 

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After finding a better way to convert the rim fires to centerfire, some of my 22's are going centerfire. The 22 rim fire shortage and ability to reload centerfire for what rim fire ammo cost make Single Six conversions worth doing.
 
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