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Discussion Starter #1
A lady about 85 asked me to evaluate her collection of firearms. Any input or interest in my letter of evaluation would be appreciated. here is a copy of the email I sent her.


I have researched all the guns pretty well other than the Double Barrel. These are my findings, and in every case, I viewed photos, close up and enlarged of the guns I found on auctions as well as some other recent opinions of values. It does cost to put guns in auctions as well as being shipped to a federal firearms dealer on the other end so you can pretty much give a pretty good deduction from auction prices. In some cases I did check blue book values which are not as accurate as recent sales at auctions.


The Colt Police positive was made in late 1917 or early 1918 according to the range of serial numbers. They were made in fairly large numbers for a long number of years without any changes. I'm judging yours at 80-85% condition which I would rate as good to very good, with Mint and New never fired in Box as being two higher grades. I didn't find any sales on a Colt Police Positive as old as yours, but did find one on a same model, barrel length and caliber made in 1931 that had sold for $600 in February. The older age might possibly get another $50 but once they get that old, it is more about condition than actual age and 12 years won't make much difference if any on a fairly high production gun. Maximum of $650, most likely $550 to 600 if auctioned or retailed. $500 from a pawn shop sounds good, I am surprised they would work on that low of a margin.


The Ruger Mark one made in 1976. There is no real value to the "Made in the year of our celebration of our Liberty" stamped in the top of the receiver. All Rugers made that year have the same imprint, and plenty were made. It could go as high as $300 on a gun auction as you have the original box. To sell to a pawn shop or gun store, you are looking at $200


Another thing to keep in mind, Auction prices are highly influenced by the reputation of the seller in previous transactions and their representations of the guns. I do not know of any local gun dealers who participate in gun auctions as sellers to take your guns to to enter them in so you wouldn't necessarily get top price. Reputation for judging the condition of the gun is important.


Your S & W Bodyguard you want to sell has a high retail of $450, so I would expect a pawn shop or gun shop to give $325 to $350.


Your pump .22 (that was wrapped in saran wrap) Winchester model 1906 was made in 1931 interestingly has a Auction value of over $500. I don't think it is so much the rarity as it is that most were just shot until they were worn out and folks seem to pass these down rather than sell them. You could expect a pawn shop or gun shop to most likely not know the value and low ball you on an offer. You would be better off just handing this gun down if you can't get a decent local offer as it will definitely need to be in a big auction site to get decent value.


The Winchester Model 74 with the scope and Mexican coins in the stock would normally carry a high retail of $300 in it's excellent condition, but the Coins inserted into the stock would lower the value about $65-75, leaving you with a high value of $225-235 and a pawn shop gunshop value of $135-150. I would buy this gun from you for what the gun shop would give you.


The Remington Scoremaster target rifle (bolt action with the magazine (clip missing) would go for $175-200 less the cost of a new magazine at $38. I would definitely put this gun on consignment for $175 as is.


The single shot Model 68 is a $80-100 retail gun, and a gun shop or pawnshop will most likely give you a $50 bill for that one.


I have not been able to find anything on the little .22 Single shot, cricket sized Mauser made in Vienna, Austria by Mauser. This is probably a gun of value but little information and probably a fairly rare gun.


For the double barrel 12 gauge muzzle loader, I suspect I might be able to take some photos, post on an internet gun forum and get some response, how ever I suspect it may have been made in the early 1,800's since there was no manufacture or patent date on it. I do not think it would be safe to fire, as the cap tubes are all rusted shut. It most likely is just something that will look good above a fireplace, but could have real value to someone if the manufacture could be identified. The 94 under the barrel makes me think it is either a 1794 manufacture or a 1894 manufacture. I don't think it would be a 1894 date as shotgun shells were in very long term use well before that date.


I still have not cleaned the leading out of the Colt barrel, but will get that done soon.


Ronnie
 

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You're a good man Jake. All things being equal, I like it when guys take the time to help little old ladies. Too many SOB's walking around these days see them as targets of opportunity. If you're not careful you may actually rekindle my faith in the human race.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The lady is a client of mine, I sold her a house 5 years ago, and I have sold over 10 houses to her kids, grandkids and nephews over the past 15 years. The only three guns I would have any interest in are the Ruger Mark 1, the Remington Scoremaster and the Winchester 74, they are all in about mint condition other than the coins in the stock of the 74.

The Colt Police Positive is a .38 S & W (.38 short) and while it might be of interest to a collector, it doesn't appeal to me as a shooter. If it were .38 special, I would have more interest.
 

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Ronnie, you are one "Prince" of a fellow!:icon_gd::icon_ peace::happy::thumb:
 

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Ronnie, you are one "Prince" of a fellow!:icon_gd::icon_ peace::happy::thumb:
Doesn't really roll off of the tongue now does it......"Prince Jake", OK lets try "Prince Ronnie", no still not sounding right. How about that "Jake sure is a Good Ole Boy" (kind of the same as being one Prince of a Texan).
 

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I think the Ruger Mk1 peeked all of our interests :) You can't go wrong with any of the Ruger 22's.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I had an identical Ruger Mark 1 target pistol I bought in 1975, I gave to my oldest son many years ago, and he still has it. I just bought a new MK III 10/45 a month ago with a threaded barrel and have three other .22 handguns.

If I had plenty of extra green stamps, I would be a player on several of the guns. That Remington Score Master is in excellent condition as is the Winchester model 74 and I had history with those same model rifles when I was in my teens.
 

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The only objective finding I have is your prices offered from Pawn shops are too high on expectations.Pawn shops are notoriusly low ball on any firearm that walks into their door,Might I offer that putting these guns on consignment will get your client more resonable vale,the more a gun shop sells it for,the more they get on commission.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Consignment at my favorite local gun shop is what I have recommended to her as he charges $29 a gun for consignment sales.

A local pawn shop offered her $500 for the Colt Police Positive (,38 S & W) and I don't think she would gain much if anything placing it on consignment as the $500 offered is probably a very good offer.

As that gun shop has a lot of bare spots on the racks and in the cases, I'm sure he would be glad to have them.

I have a feeling that the little Cricket sized Mauser .22 single shot may have value as so far I haven't found any internet information on it. I could't find any date of manufacture on iit, but it looks pre-WWII and was made in Vienna, Austria. I will probably do a post with photos on it and also the muzzle loading 12 gauge to see if anyone has any ideas!
 

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I think the Ruger Mk1 peeked all of our interests :) You can't go wrong with any of the Ruger 22's.
I tend to agree. When times got tough and I sold my collection of 26 handguns, I sold a couple Pythons, several pinned barrel Smith's, Browning Hi Power, custom Colt Government Model - all of them top shelf firearms. The only one I refused to let go was my Ruger Mark II Government Target Model. Not the most valuable in the collection by any stretch of the imagination - but that one's over thirty years old and it will still knock the lint off a gnat's ass at 25 yards. ;)
 

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The single shot .22: can you get pics of this? The single sounds like a trainer rifle. Not many of those pre-WW2 trainers left around. Get me a pic, and I'll shake the bush on a few forums I'm on.

Local shop here gets around $300-$500 on a used pump .22 with good rifling/bluing. Those are no longer made, and still popular.

The DB muzzleloader sounds more like a wall hanger than a shooter. However, cap nipples are replaceable(or reparable if the rust isn't too bad). Depending on the age, a collector might pay a good bit if it's cleaned up.

Called a friend on the Ruger and Colt PP .38S&W. $500 is a good offer, as most don't go much over that on GB. HOWEVER, it being a Colt, value will only increase as Colt is out of the civilian market. The Ruger would only bring a premium if it has the original box/paperwork and is virtually unfired. $300 is a good price, with $200-$250 being listed for "fair" condition.

ETA: IF it's a true Mauser, is it this one?

Mauser --- Es350B Meisterschafts Championship Single Shot Rifle --- .22 Long Rifle - Mauser Rifles Military

Scope that price. Called my bud back, and he said if it is this Mauser, you are looking at $800 on the low end all the way up to $2K for a "prime specimen"(at least 95% bluing and a good, clean/sharp rifled bore).
 

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The only objective finding I have is your prices offered from Pawn shops are too high on expectations.Pawn shops are notoriusly low ball on any firearm that walks into their door,Might I offer that putting these guns on consignment will get your client more resonable vale,the more a gun shop sells it for,the more they get on commission.
I think you did a great Job and do agree that Pawn shops tend to really low ball.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Lone Eagle, The Mauser is a kid sized rifle like a Cricket, not a training rifle, with a manual cocking pull back firing pin knob. A one piece stock with checkered forearm, and it doesn't look like it was cut down from an adult sized trainer. I'm thinking this may be rarer than the Mauser trainer.

I will get photos of it and the Double barrel muzzle loader.

I feel like the double barrel may have been made in a blacksmith or machine shop, back in the day before mass production techniques.
 

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Lone Eagle, The Mauser is a kid sized rifle like a Cricket, not a training rifle, with a manual cocking pull back firing pin knob. A one piece stock with checkered forearm, and it doesn't look like it was cut down from an adult sized trainer. I'm thinking this may be rarer than the Mauser trainer.

I will get photos of it and the Double barrel muzzle loader.

I feel like the double barrel may have been made in a blacksmith or machine shop, back in the day before mass production techniques.
I would love to see pictures of the double barrel shot gun. If I had a picture perhaps one of the old gun experts will now about it over at the CAS forum http://www.cascity.com/forumhall/ A number of them there are very knowledgable on guns from the late 1700 to 1800's.
 

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That pricing sound fair to me Jake. I paid $200 for a Ruger Mark I a couple of years ago. I would also be interested in the pictures of the old muzzle loader. There were a lot of those sold in the US 1850's to 1890's. There were a number of European manufacturers that were selling them in bulk to general stores all over America. Most of them have Damascus steel barrels and are no longer safe to shoot even with lite loads of Black Powder. Shine them up and make them pretty and hang them over your fireplace.
 

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The Mauser is a kid sized rifle like a Cricket, not a training rifle, with a manual cocking pull back firing pin knob. A one piece stock with checkered forearm, and it doesn't look like it was cut down from an adult sized trainer. I'm thinking this may be rarer than the Mauser trainer.
That little Mauser sounds like my Winchester Model 67A, sans checkering and maybe a little longer. That Model 67A was my Hunting/Varmint Rifle back when I was a brat. Could be Winchester copied the Mauser. There were smaller "Cricket Size" versions of the Winchester 67 made.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Model_67


 
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