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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you use, and how, to degrease your new guns?

I use non-chlorinated brake cleaner. Just blast out all the books and crannies.

All the Best,
D. White
 

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I've only bought one new pistol in the last several years, a PT738. Once disassembled, the entire pistol fit nicely in my ultrasonic cleaner. Ten minutes in the bath, squeaky clean, ready for lube & range check. No problem.
 
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I usually clean a new gun as I do a dirty gun coming from the range - but yes, brake cleaner generally gets involved :)
 

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GREAT question!

For revolvers: Every new revolver gets a full cleaning, along with (if possible) removal of the grips and a trigger group disassembly, cleaning, smoothing pieces and the frame if necessary, and a reassembly with a just a little gun oil on a cleaning patch to apply lube where necessary. My favorite cleaning products are Montana Extreme products.

For semi-autos I'll do the cleaning and lubrication. I have not found a need to do a "trigger job" on the semi-autos, however, I do smooth any rough edges I find on the guide rod and other pieces.

I have not had a long gun in my possession for about 15 years; so I will let someone more experienced than me speak on what to do to those.
 

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Like D White I use the brake cleaner and if you have a lot of carbon like build up in the shootin iron to go a marine parts and service store and get a can of (MERCURY POWER TUNE) IT is designed for cutting carbon out of two cycle engines there is nothing like it. I've never used it on polymer type guns so you might check it out first after it sets for awhile and does its thing I just rinse it off with brake cleaner then hit it with an air hose. I used it to clean carbon off the top of pistons and the carbon out of the ring grooves. I've cleaned a lot of shotguns during duck season for my boss and his cronies back in the 80's.
Evinrude and Johnson has the same thing under another name that I can't recall
 
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I agree with Bellows.... I have bought a fair number of new guns (more than most) and I find no need to break them down, polish the internal parts, or scrub them out with a wild assortment of cleaning chemicals. The exception to that are mil surps as they usually need cleaning.

I have toured a number of gun manufacturing facilities and watched them being assembled and have never seen any new American made guns full of shavings dirt, chips, or anything else I see reported by some inside new guns.

Maybe I buy enough new guns that I am just not impressed by breaking them down, scrubbing, polishing, adjusting, and whatever else some folks do to enhance the new gun experience. If and when I buy a gun that is dirty enough to cause me problems I will simply alert the manufacturer about it. When it happens a second time I will no longer buy that brand of gun.

I am talking about new guns. A used gun is a different story.

As with almost anything, it all becomes a matter of personal preference.

Don
 

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I agree with Don none of my new guns have really been dirty enough to justify a real tear down. Once I start using them they get cleaned often enough that I have very little build up of anything
 

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Like D White I use the brake cleaner and if you have a lot of carbon like build up in the shootin iron to go a marine parts and service store and get a can of (MERCURY POWER TUNE) IT is designed for cutting carbon our of two cycle engines there is nothing like it. I've never used it on polymer type guns so you might check it out first after it sets for awhile and does its thing I just rinse it off with brake cleaner then hit it with compressed air
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My replacement ATI 1911 came in today. It's covered in heavy oil, of course.

Brake cleaner had it all off in no time.

All the Best,
D. White
 
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I clean the frame and slide with GunScrubber, then use Hoppes to clean out everything with cotton patches. Then, I spray a little Ballistol into the trigger assembly and I also use it on a patch after I've cleaned out the barrel with Hoppes, just to lightly lube the barrel. Lastly, I use a tube of gun lube to put just a little on the rails before I slide it back onto the frame.

Taurus guns are by far the most filthy guns out of the box that I've ever encountered. I'd recommend cleaning them before taking them to the range.
 

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depends on the gun for me. glocks or 1911's ill literally take down to the last pin and clean and lube. other models not so much. really depends on my mood and whether i have the energy to do it. otherwise it is a complete wipe down with some of my home made clp and a good wiping.
 

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What do you use, and how, to degrease your new guns?

I use non-chlorinated brake cleaner. Just blast out all the books and crannies.

All the Best,
D. White
I've had the "opportunity" to clean cosmoline from a gun. The best way I've found is to tear the gun down, put the components on several layers of absorbent paper towel or lint-free cloth in a cookie sheet (don't use it for cookies in the future), put the whole she-bang in the oven at about 180 degrees and let the crap flow out of the gun. As far as a new gun, I normally clean it as per the owner's manual. Below is a paper I wrote years ago. I've put it on the site a couple of times, but it seems like somewhat fair information:

What To Do When You Take Your New Gun Out Of The Box
I’ve been around guns all my life, and upon occasion, have even had the pleasure of buying and shooting a brand new in the box, never been fired before gun. I’ve also had the pleasure of unpacking and preparing for use a number of military weapons, which I am living testament to, are packed in the most obnoxious, gooey, sticky, slimy stuff you can imagine – cosmoline. But the latter is a story for a different paper.

I’ve spoken with friends and associates who have complained that their gun didn’t work as expected right out of the box. They experienced failure to fire, failure to eject, magazines failing to drop, slides not locking back after the last round and a host of other problems. Most of these problems can be narrowed down to the fact that the gun was not “treated” fairly prior to its first range session.

New guns come in a number of pre-fire conditions. Some are loaded down with oil, grease or other preservative “goo.” Others come packaged dryer than a popcorn fart. Most come in some condition between the two. Below are a few steps you can take to make sure that your first firing session is successful and you and your gun go home happy. Before you leave your gun shop or on the way home, stop and get a good cleaning kit. You should be able to purchase a kit for around $30. That kit is more important that even the ammo you will later purchase for the gun. In addition to the kit, get some solvent and some lube and some dry lube such as powdered graphite or Remington Dry Lube. Hoppe’s #9 is probably the most common. There are others; Gunzilla, CLP, and other stuff, but you can’t go wrong with Hoppe’s. And the smell is addicting. I think there might be some after shave or cologne which has the fragrance of Hoppe’s. Get solvent and lube and the dry lube. They are not interchangeable.

1) Take your new gun to a quiet place in your house. Open the gun case. Take the gun out and admire it. Pat yourself on the back for being a wise and astute consumer and making a wise and educated choice. Now put the gun back in the case and take out the owner’s manual. Don’t put the magazine (God forbid that you would call the thingy that holds the rounds a clip. It ain’t a clip. It has a spring and a follower. It is a magazine) into the magazine well. Don’t rack back the slide. Don’t mess with the trigger. READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL COVER TO COVER. Now, do it again. Read the parts that describe the operation, field stripping and cleaning several times. Do it again.

2) While some experts may tell you your new gun is ready to fire right out of the box, that’s a fallacy. It may be ready to fire from a mechanical standpoint, but unless you want to find out how efficient the Customer Service department is at your gun shop or at the home office of the manufacturer of your gun, you might want to follow the steps in this paper. Field strip your gun. Put it back together. Do it again. Do it again. Do it until it becomes second nature. Become one with the gun. Get real intimate with your new friend. Make sure you do this on a table in a small room if possible, with no hidden corners or carpets. Keep in mind that the famous Mr. Murphy is watching you constantly, and there are a couple of springs in your new gun which may or may not become airborne with great force, and have an innate ability to find the best hiding places when released from captivity.

3) Field strip the gun and follow the directions for cleaning in the owner’s manual. Most cleaning kits contain a toothbrush. It’s for your gun, not for your pearly white’s. Apply the solvent liberally and use the toothbrush to scrub every available surface on the slide and the frame. Your gun does not need heavy grease in order to operate. It does need light lubricant, but we’ll discuss that a little later. Take the brush which came in your kit, and is made for the bore of the caliber gun you bought. If you aren’t sure, the brush will be slight larger in diameter than the inside diameter of the barrel. Put a few drops of solvent on the brush and run the brush through the bore going from the chamber end to the muzzle end. (If you don’t know the difference, you haven’t read your owner’s manual enough times). Allow the brush to turn. It’s simply following the rifling in your barrel. This is good. Now, put the patch holder on the rod instead of the brush and put a couple of drops of solvent on the patch. Make sure the patch meets with a little resistance as you push it into the bore, again going from chamber to muzzle. Run the patch up and down the bore and make sure it emerges clean. Take a clean bore patch and spray a few drops of wet lube on it and run it up and down the bore. This will coat the bore and keep the rust away.

When you are cleaning the gun, make sure to get all of the packing grease and gunk off of the moving parts, off of the slide, off of the guide rod and springs, and pay particular attention to the firing pin hole. You can use a lint free cloth or bore patches to wipe the gun down. Once the rag or bore patch no longer picks up any grease, you should be ready to lube the gun. DO NOT OVER LUBE!!!! Most good gun lubes come with a syringe which will enable you to accurately place a drop or two of lube in tight places. If not, you need to find a container in your gun shop which has such a device. Put a drop or two of lube on the slide guides, the guide rod and springs and any place where there is metal to metal or metal to polycarbonate contact. Wipe off any excess. You can now use the spry lube and lube the trigger assembly and put a little into the firing pin recess.

4) Reassemble your gun.

5) Disassemble and clean your magazine. The mag is an integral part of your weapon system. Make sure the spring and follower are clean and there are no burrs on the feed lips at the top of the mag. A little 200 grit emery cloth can be used to remove burrs.

6) Reassemble the mag.

You should now be ready for a range session. Some folks will tell you to shoot one round then clean then shoot two round then clean again before loading a full mag into the gun. I don’t really subscribe to that school because most modern semi-automatics are built with enough interlocks and safeties so that accidental fully automatic fire is about as common as a vegan at a Bar-B-Que. But it may not be a bad idea to load 2 or 3 rounds into the mag for the first couple of shooting cycles.

There are those who will tell you that you should only clean your gun when it fails to operate properly. My suggestion is that you clean your gun after every range session, and if you carry it, once a week. But then I’m pretty anal about having a clean firearm.
 

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cleaning of a new firearm for me runs from cleaning a 2-3 year old Taurus that has hardened factory grease in it to cleaning a CZ that is test fired, cleaned, properly lubricated with a light weight gun oil.
so it depends!
generally the taurus takes a bit of time, some serious de greasing and inspection. the CZ takes a general disassembly , inspection reassembly and off to the range.
The worst new gun to clean was a Rock Island Tactical 1911 , it came encased in a plastic baggy that appeared to have old axle dope form a jiffy lube shop.
it did and has ran flawlessly however since the cleaning.
 

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Depends on what it needs.

Many imported guns have a preservative/rust inhibitor in them. That makes sense, because they will sit for months in shipment or waiting to clear customs. No sense in having a brand new gun rust up while waiting for paper work to clear. Leaving that stuff in a gun and shooting it runs from benign to "HOLY CRAP what have I done," depending on how much and what was used. Some of it will heat up and weep out, making a mess or being absorbed into the wood. Other chemicals act as catch-alls and dust magnets for a while before baking itself into a nasty version of rock candy. It don't belong in a functioning gun, so it gets removed.

Gun Scrubber is my go to for those occasions most of the time. In some cases, I'll use a couple or three cans on one gun. After all of the preservatives are gone, it gets wiped down with an oily rag, lubed and the bore and chamber(s) get cleaned like usual.

Cosmoline is the worst. (insert shudder of dread here)

I've got a Mauser (German made, Portuguese '98, originally chambered in a 6.5mm but rechambered into 8mm around WWII) that I bought back in the early '90's that was so saturated in the stuff that the upper forearm wood still weeps the stuff out on occasion. I've heated, soaked (wall paper troughs are handy for that when cleaning rifles, by the way) and scrubbed the thing quite a few times but so much has soaked into the wood that it still occasionally weeps some out after a shooting session on a warm day.
 

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It depends on the gun for me as well.

If it's my S&W 9mm:
I like using Hoppe's #9 bore solvent and also Hoppe's oil.
Take the slide off, spring, rod and barrel out. Use q-tips most of the time.
Also, take the mag's apart and do the same. Sometimes I'll soak the mag's in warm water and dawn dish detergent, rinse and then use an air compressor to blow all of the water out, then put a few drop of oil on the inside.

If it is my Taurus PT-22, TCP PT-738 or my Heritage Arms single action .22LR revolver:
I like using Ballistol for cleaning, and cleaning and protecting on the outside.
For the inside of the mag's I use REM oil.
And before I go to the range, I usually open them up, and put a few drops of REM oil on the slide rails.
I found that REM oil seems to work well on all three of these guns, even on top of initial Ballistol.

Works for me. :)
 
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