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So I am a new gun owner. I just purchased my 24/7 G2 45 compact. Now I need to do my chores. I was a bit freaked out and small at my LGS they had a whole isle of cleaning kits... What do I really need? Are there kits that are cheaper or should I just buy all the pieces. Are there big differences in brand? Any thoughts on where I should buy it?
 

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Mine is above snake in each cal, toothbrush, towel, qtips, CLP, remoil...that's it. I love the bore snake as it makes cleaning very easy and it is thorough.
 

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I find the best kit to buy is the one in your area that also carries same brand individual components. Many cleaning components are not compatible (thread size, etc) with other manufacturers. You mostly get what you pay for. For example some cleaning rods are made more cheaply, hollow, and are susceptible to bending whereas a more costly rod will be solid, strong, etc. Regardless of caliber and firearm, I like a long enough rod, brass / bronze / copper brush attachment, nylon brush attachment, both slotted and jag style patch holder. You can always use the plastic bristle brushes that are small on one end and like a toothbrush on the other. Q-tips, pipe cleaners, etc. I also use a set of steel and hardened plastic picks though you can get by without them. Canned air is good too. This will start the responses ok.
 

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Save your money for ammo.....Go with an inexpensive all purpose kit in your caliber at first. It will have everything you will need to start. Just make sure it does not have a steel brush, they destroy your barrel. Aluminum brushes are ok and brass brushes are better. As you gain more experience you will find more products you may like better. I still use the old fashioned Hopps 9 solvent for the past 40 years and I'm happy with it. My guns are happy with just plain ole gun oil. A lot of fellows love RemOil by Remington, I never used it so I have no comment on it. Rags and patches will be needed. I just cut up an old cotton T shirt and use it.
 

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Save your money for ammo.....Go with an inexpensive all purpose kit in your caliber at first. It will have everything you will need to start. Just make sure it does not have a steel brush, they destroy your barrel. Aluminum brushes are ok and brass brushes are better. As you gain more experience you will find more products you may like better. I still use the old fashioned Hopps 9 solvent for the past 40 years and I'm happy with it. My guns are happy with just plain ole gun oil. A lot of fellows love RemOil by Remington, I never used it so I have no comment on it. Rags and patches will be needed. I just cut up an old cotton T shirt and us it.
I couldn't have said it better.
 

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I don't know what to tell you, I have an entire tool box overflowing with cleaning equipment because each caliber generally needs it's own size rod, handguns need shorter ones, bore brushes in assorted sizes, then there are the liquids like bore srubbers an lubes, different for smokless and black powders, patches an swabs, a few screw drivers, hex wrenches an other tools, silicone wiping cloth and so on. Then after a few decades of use some have broken parts and you buy more of the same saving the old stuff "just in case". But I can clean the bore in any firearm with a bore size between .17 and 12 gauge and have the tools to take down or assemble firearms or install/remove scopes in that box. Yes this is in the truck when I go to the range because you just never know if you will drop a firearm and fill the bore with mud, have a squib or just need to tighten a stock screw....
 
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The bare essentials: Rod, brass brush, patch holder or jag, patches. Solution for your barrel (eg. Hoppes 9) and a solution for the rest of the gun (eg. CLP product).
 

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instead of regular ol' q-tips, you can find special "pointed" q-tips in the makeup section, I think they are for fingernail detailing. They REALLY get into tighter places than regular ones, and are tougher.
 

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And to add, most cleaning brass brushes will need to be replaced. After useing them for awhile as the brass bristles become deformed, so don't spend a lot on them
 

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i started with this, then added to it. hoppe's 9, patches, q-tips, flashlight to check the bore, rem oil, etc etc...

View attachment 111192
That would be my recomendation for a starter as well. I would also add a bore snake in the appropriate caliber.

Don't let the number of choices mess with you. Its like laundry detergent, whole isles are dedicated to the stuff, you just have to pick what you like.
 
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I have used these Otis kits for many years in the military and they are excellent for beginners. They can clip on your belt. They are small enough to toss in a range bag or backpack and they handle everything. I still like Boresnakes, but they are only really good for cleaning barrels. The Otis kit covers everything you need in a small package.

Otis 9mm to 45 Cal Professional Pistol Cleaning System

For those in the military, if you can get to one of the AUSA conventions, Otis hands out these kits free to those in uniform, or at least they did at the last 3 or 4 I attended. AUSA has two of these every year, one is in Washington DC, and the other is in Orlando, FL. There are many other vendors who hand out free stuff to servicemen too.
 

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Dental tools are also good for poking around in those tiny crevices. All I did was asked my dentist and he handed me three or four that were headed to the recycle bin.
 

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You can pick up a universal kit that will clean a broad range of guns (pistols, shotguns, and rifles) for pretty cheap but as long as you get a cleaning rod, bronze bore brush. slotted tip/jag(for patches), patches, an old toothbrush, a cleaner of some kind, an a lubricant you will be good to go.

I personally started with Hoppes #9 solvent and oil, and decided to add a grease for the slide/frame rails because it stayed in place better.

Now I use FrogLube and love it. It cleans, lubricates and protects all with one product. I also keep a can of GunScrubber around for new weapons to help cut through the factory oil and grease.
 
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My $0.02 - Hoppes starter kit. Get a cheap tackle box at wallyworld, keep your cleaning stuff in there. A couple of old t-shirts come in handy. Q-tips, old toothbrush, and the bore brush and jag for your caliber.

1. Clear and field strip the pistol.
2. Attach the brass or copper bore brush to the cleaning rod
3. dip the brush into the hoppes #9 bore cleaner
4. run the bore brush from the breech to the muzzle (in the direction that the bullet travels) multiple times (I generally do 10)
*Always push the brush completely through the barrel before pulling it back through.
5. Soak a few cleaning patches in Hoppes Bore cleaner and, using the Jag, run them through one at a time, removing the patch when it exits the muzzle (don't drag a dirty patch back through!) until they come through clean.
6. Repeat steps 3 - 5 until the patch comes through clean on the first or second run. Place the barrel in a clean spot out of the way.
7. dip the toothbrush / cleaning brush into the Hoppes #9 and scrub the slide thoroughly, then wipe clean with a piece of old (but clean) t-shirt.
8. Do the same with the innards of the frame as much as possible and also wipe clean.
9. lightly oil the sections that contain moving parts and a light coat of oil on the barrel, slide, and any other metal surfaces does not hurt.


That's pretty much what I do, just add a bunch of anal retentivism.
 

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I'm always amazed at all the options people use for gun cleaning.

Just keep in mind guns are just hunks of metal.

I use Windex - Q-tips - toilet paper.
I lube with wheel bearing grease. Recommended by Yeager from Youtube.
 

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Eh, just dunk it in Boiling water , swish it around a bit, let it dry and throw some motor oil on it. That's what they did in WWII and Korea and it was good enough to win real wars.
On a serious note, the Hoppes kit works well as do all the others with a brass or fiberglass rod. For overall cleaning Hoppes #9 solvent probably works the best.You dont need anything fancy that costs 5 times what Hoppes does. For lubes, greases and oils, try one, see how it works then try another one. You'll settle on the one you like in short time. I use Hoppes solvent and G96 synthetic because I got it on sale.
 

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...the Hoppes kit works well as do all the others with a brass or fiberglass rod. For overall cleaning Hoppes #9 solvent probably works the best.You dont need anything fancy that costs 5 times what Hoppes does...
I primarily use Hoppes because I like the smell .:cool:
 

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You can pick up a universal kit that will clean a broad range of guns (pistols, shotguns, and rifles) for pretty cheap but as long as you get a cleaning rod, bronze bore brush. slotted tip/jag(for patches), patches, an old toothbrush, a cleaner of some kind, an a lubricant you will be good to go.

I personally started with Hoppes #9 solvent and oil, and decided to add a grease for the slide/frame rails because it stayed in place better.

Now I use FrogLube and love it. It cleans, lubricates and protects all with one product. I also keep a can of GunScrubber around for new weapons to help cut through the factory oil and grease.
Yup that's what I did also! A gun cleaning kit is like a regular tool kit. You'll add what you need to it as time goes by (needing things as the type of guns you get changes).
 
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