Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After using about 200 patches and a good deal of Hoppes, I've just about reached the end of my rope with my PT145's barrel.

I went to the range two days ago and put 100 rounds of Remington UMC JHPs through my PT145 and started to clean the gun as soon as I got home. I disassembled the pistol and filled the barrel with some gunslick foaming bore cleaner and proceeded to clean the rest of the pistol. After letting the gunslick soak for a while, I removed any remaining residue and started my usual method of running a bore brush soaked in Hoppes through the barrel, followed by running patches through it until the come out clean. After the aforementioned 200 patches (and a few more applications of foaming bore cleaner), they're still coming out black after brushing and turning green after sitting for a while.

Does anyone have some advice on what I should do to get this darn barrel clean? I can't see any reason that it should be THIS dirty and have that much copper in it after firing only 100 rounds of relatively clean ammo (in my experience, anyhow).
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,626 Posts
How are you running the patch through the barrel, I'm assuming with a steel brush or something similar that actually 'scrubs' the barrel walls.....

Welcome to the forum, by the way.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Never use a steel brush. It will destroy the rifling in your barrel. Stick with either copper or a nylon brush. You may just have a rough barrel, but with a different approach, it should come out clean.

Wrap a patch around the brush so it holds more solution. Run it through the barrel and let it sit for 10 mins. Wrap a patch around the jag and run that through the barrel.

Wrap another patch around a nylon brush (not copper, which you'll see why). Put some J-B's Bore Paste or Cleaning Compound on the patch. JB's contains pumice and will not scratch the bore. A cheaper method that works is Soft Scrub, which you can find at any grocery store. It won't scratch formica, so a steel barrel is no worries.

Run the nylon brush back 'n forth INSIDE the barrel. Do not let the brush to fully exit the chamber or muzzle of the barrel. You can't (shouldn't) do this with a copper brush as it will break off pieces of the copper needles inside the barrel. Keep doing this until the brush runs smoothly thru the entire length of the barrel. It may take 10, 20, or even 30 strokes.

Now using a clean patch and brush, run some more Hoppes through it to remove all the JB's. Now do the same with a soaked patch/jag, pushing it all the way through, and use a clean patch each time through. Another method to remove JB's is to simply wash it under running water, while working a nylon brush through it. So long as you dry the barrel immediately afterwards, rust shouldn't be a concern.

Run a dry patch/jag to remove any remaining Hoppes and then a lightly oiled patch/jag for rust protection.

All of this may be for naught, however. Over time, if you save your scores, you may find that the Taurus actually shoots better with a slightly dirty barrel. See my post at http://www.taurusarmed.net/forums/index.php?topic=7049.0

Best of luck to you.

Forgot to add:
JB's can be found at Brownells.
If using Soft Scrub or Ajax, make sure it is the type without Bleach. Also check the back to make sure it does not scratch formica. If not, then you're good to go. I've used both JB's and Soft scrub for ages on both rifles and pistols for ages, with no problems.
Also, it pays to get a bore guide so you don't ding up your chamber.
When using a jag or patch pusher, never pull it back into the barrel as it may ding the muzzle. Almost impossible for a jag, since the patch will probably fall off, but just wanted to add this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,779 Posts
The various "Lead Away" cloths sold by Birchwood Casey, Adco, and others can be used with a jag to remove stubborn fouling, including copper. They will also smooth a barrel. Using a dedicated copper remover, clean the barrel. After that, cut patches from the cloth to obtain a tight fit, sit back, watch some TV, and scrub the barrel from the chamber end. As mentioned, the jag, wrapped in the cloth, shouldn't be allowed to completely exit the barrel. However, if you wrap a small bit of electrical tape behind the jag, on the rod, you can pretty much eliminate the chances of dinging the barrel crown.

We had a medic who purchased a Firestar M45. She decided to "really clean" her barrel with one of these cloths. Watched a full 60 minute show, while scrubbing the barrel, and changing cloths every 10 minutes or so, and the barrel would hurt your eyes to look into. Never had any problems cleaning it after that, either.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,273 Posts
I use the appropriate caliber sized Nylon Bore Brush with a thick patch soaked with Noxon7 Metal Cleaner/Polish and clean the Barrel only till the lands have a nice shine to them. Noxon7 is also non-abrasive and will not harm your barrel. Most barrels will only take 10 to 12 patches of Noxon7 and does a great job removing Lead and Copper. I really like using it for Cleaning barrels fouled by Cast Bullet shooting. Noxon7 is available in most Department and Hardware stores.

Noxon7 does have high ammonia content, so use it in a well ventilated area. After you are done running patches of it thru your bore, run a water soaked patch thru the bore to remove any trace of it. No oil based solvent will cut it. I then use a patch soaked with Disc Brake Cleaner to dry out the bore.

I do use patches of regular oil based solvent to clean out the loose fouling before using the Noxon7.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the help, guys.

The barrel still isn't perfectly clean, but it's a lot better than it used to be. I got some JB's and ran that through the barrel to get quite a bit more crud out, and also tried some Gunslick Copper-Klenz to remove any remaining copper fouling. I'll have to take it to the range this weekend and try running some JB's through it while the barrel is still warm and see if I can't get the rest of that powder out of the grooves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
On Autos you can get your favorite solvent and keep it in a tupperware tub with a lid roughly the size of the barrel, I like to mark these with a sharpie that says solvent on them so I don't get them confused with the stuff I put food in. I let the barrel soak in Hoppes no 9 or equivalent overnight. Then I run a bore brush through with the soak. I got surgical gloves to avoid getting solvent on my hands. This should get the tough stuff. Larger caliber barrels lets you get a copper toothbrush in those tough spots, or you can try using a .22 bore brush for the crevices in the barrel.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,626 Posts
Ace, you know what they should make? Some kind of rubber plug for the barrel end that will let you just pour the solvent into the barrel and not waste so much by pouring it into a bowl.....hmmmm, a new idea to throw around.......
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,273 Posts
Actually, there is and already existing product like that. They are called "Chamber Plugs". Unfortunately, I have only seen them for Rifles and Shotguns. MidwayUSA had them for sale at one time and probably still does. There is a possibility that they could be adapted for some handguns with the same shell base size.

On a side note pertaining to my earlier recommendation for Noxon7, Brasso will also work in a similar fashion, but Noxon7 works better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
I don't waste that much I can get a lot of use out of one batch the fouling tends to settle on the bottom of the bowl. The soak does a lot of good and you save on running a bunch of patches down the bore. Now if only I can afford to dip my AR-15's in solvent? Hmmmmmmmm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
NYPD in AZ said:
I just ordered one of these:

http://www.balkowitsch.com/productinfo.php?pid=610

A SWAT officer whose locker is 2 away from mine has the same one and told me it is well worth the price.
I can vouch for L&R Ultrasonics as a reliable manufacturer. Their units are very popular in the dental field. They have been around for years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,342 Posts
We used the ultrasonic cleaners when I was in the Marines. I can state, without any doubt, that nothing, and I repeat, NOTHING will get a gun cleaner. I had forgotten completely about those until you just mentioned it above.

Hey guys, for stainless, here's a suggestion that I've been doing for years...

I put my Ruger Redhawk into the dishwasher, run the cycle, gun comes out completely clean, then I just wipe it down with a light coat of RemOil... I've been doing this with this particular gun for over 10 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
I usually soak the metal components in kerosene and wipe them clean then air dry them. Afterwards I lubricate with gun oil. Simple cleaning method but to me it's very effective and economical.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
22,058 Posts
An ultrasonic cleaner with Hoppes #9 is very effective. I clean aircraft piston engine fuel injectors this way. When you clean and let soak overnight they come out looking brand new.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top