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Ok, we all are observant, smart people. It has become patently obvious that the America my grandfathers fought for was consumed in the 60's. Hurricane Katrina showed that it is possible to have widespread chaos and loss of order in an American city, even though the circumstances surronding New Orleans were unique and it was perhaps the most chaotic American city.

All this being said, lets speculate that some major catastophe, i.e. hurricane, earthquake, flood, uprising (possible in some places), terrorist attack, plague of locusts etc etc, hits your area. What are you stocking up on? What would be your plan? What guns would you find the most important to have?

Stocking up: I am stocking up on ammo right now. I have 1000 rounds of .45acp and 9mm coming to me. I also am stocking up on 7.62x54 and 7.62x39 because I have a number of guns that fire these rounds.

I also try ot keep as much gas on hand at home along with a working generator.

The normal food and water of course. RAdio and plentyof batteries are on hand as well.

Plan: My plan depends on the circumstances. I live in the suburbs of a major city and can be in more rural ares in less than 30 minutes. My neighborhood would probably get dangerous quick in the event of a break down of law and order. We all ready have plenty of crimes committed in my area by scum who come from ghettos in the city to rob the better off people. I think that an abscence of authority would mean that my neighborhood would be crawling with dangerous looters and thieves with weapons trying to get their hands on vehicles, jewelry, and electronics.

I am sure that a few of my neighbors are well armed, but I am also sure that there are a number of pacifists in the area.

I would probably sit tight and wait to find out what was happening. A couple of days of chaos I could handle, a few weeks would be more difficult.

Guns I want to have: I would want to have as much ammo on hand to begin with, regardless of what I have to shoot it out of.

I tend to prefer handguns in common easy to find calibers like 9mm, .22, and .45acp. I have enough handguns to arm every member of my family who would be in the immediate area.

For rifles, I prefer the military surplus stuff I can get cheap and discard easily.A mixture of semiautos and boltguns seems appropriate to me.

I also have more shotguns than I know what to do with and enough buckshot to last a few weeks of hard shooting.

As a student of history I know how quickly chaos and disorder can come and I would at least like to be prepared.
 

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holy crap, when the bottom falls out I'm taking me and mine to live with you and yours. :)

I'm just now starting to get this kind of stuff underway. I've made a commitment to have at minimum 500 rounds on hand for every gun. We're also stocking up on canned goods and I'm making plans for a generator sooner or later.

At the moment we only have a .45 and a .9mm but we plan on getting a few shottys and a rifle or two soon.

Also moving out of my bee-hive of an apt and moving out toward the suburbs more. Unfortunately I have to live in or very close to a city to get a job doing what i'm doing.

Our long-term plan is to construct an underground house both for economy and security. I started an initial discussion on this thread to talk about concerns with that http://www.texasshooting.com/TexasCHL_Forum/viewtopic.php?t=8594&highlight=hobbit

I'm also looking at large water tank storage and purification options as well.
 

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Keep a stock of supplies (food, water, ammo, medical supplies, battery's, flashlights, lanterns, generator plus fuel... etc.). Basically watch an good zombie movie and plan accordingly ;)

I have a couple of BUGOUT bags packed and ready to go, with enough provisions for 2 people to last a week or two if used sparingly and be on the move, on foot if need be. It may sound paranoid and I don't normally advertise, but better to be prepared then wish you had been...
 

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If you have camping as a hobby you already have a basis of non-weapon gear. I have shelter and the ability to cook food. Toss in my available weapons loadout and I'll do ok. I'm not the most happy with the amount of stored non-perishable food here but there are other issues with the crew I live with. Don't forget a well stocked first aid kit and some general household and mechanical tools, you might have to fix something.

Stockpiling ammo with the way prices are going up makes economic sense as well. I haven't checked recently but from early March to early May Wolf 223 went up 10%. Plus its still difficult to get M193 or M855 ammo (US military issue type surplused ammo) and the prices are outragous if you do find it. I've even heard of law enforemend departments having to wait months for ammo orders. Gives a whole other meaning to Have it and ot need it vs need it and not have it doesn't it?

I try to keep a box or two of cheap JHP's for my carry guns as a reserve. The WWB JHP's may not be the latest design but I know they will feel and they'll perform better than FMJ. I try to limit the number of "primary" calibers so its easier to stock larger quantities. For example, I like my makarov but I don't order ammo in larger amounts. However, there's several hundred rounds of 9mm sitting around (and I feel that I should have more). I'm comfortable on 12ga social ammo and sitting decent on 223 for the AR. Plus I have odds and ends of ammo that I could give/sell/trade to a neighbor if they were low. Yes, there could be issues with that idea but thats another set of eyes watching the neighborhood.

Don't forget that all the ammo in the world won't help you if you only have 1 or 2 reliable magazines for your weapon. For shotguns, there are ammo bandoleers that don't cost much and take up little space until you fill them (plus the elastic goes to pot after a while, BTDT).

As shooters we tend to focus on the weapon aspect of this but for most situations food, water, shelter etc will be more important. Like having a place to evacuate to, not just "I'll head up north". Well, thousands of others have the same idea. Talk to friends who live a ways away, its a safe location for a while.

Steelheart
 

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I'm a minor freak when it comes to this stuff, not an all out SHTF nut but I do have a touch of the disease.

I have a bug out kit for the family, I could have kitchen, tent and sleeping arrangements, food/water and all necessities for a couple weeks for +/-6 people in the truck in ten minutes. It's all packed and organized (same as if I went camping).

I don't have all my guns packed because they wouldn't fit in the safe like that, but I do have a planned arrangement and could have 2 AR's, 2 AK's, 2 .22's, 2 12 ga and about 6 pistols into the cases and in the truck in less than 5 min. (sadly enough I practice the routine when getting ready for a range trip) This is most likely all the guns I'd take, I'd leave most at home.

I already have 3K in 7.62X39, 2K in .223, 500 12ga buck/slug mix, 5k or more of .22 and 2K ea of .45 and 9mm. All of this is already canned and good to go very quickly.

CB, NOAA and GMRS radios, a couple of GPS. A small cash stash just in case, but wish I had more (and maybe gold or some other non-currency based valuable)

Fortunately I live less than a mile from the entrance from 30K+ acres of BLM land which then adjoins to close to a million acres of Ntl Forest. Plenty of game and natural food around too.

My wife thinks I'm nuts, but what's new?

I told you I had a touch of the disease. (although if you check out some these survival websites, I am woefully underprepared according to them) ::)
 

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As the year 2000 (Y2K) approached, I was among those who prepared for the event of a major melt-down on New Years Eve. Since then, the canned food has been consumed, as has the water and other perishables that I stocked. They are now acquired in less quantity on a rotation for freshness. I still have the gasoline generator which is largely unused.

I am blessed to live in a rural area of abundant game, so I prepared by purchasing a deer / elk rifle, Remington 700, .270win. I also have a Marlin lever action .30-30 that is excellent for harvesting game animals. A Mossberg 12 gage in a tactical configuration, useful for game shot, or 00 buck. Ditto, with a Stoeger 12 ga side-by-side. And a variety of large and small caliber pistols for each person who finds themselves living under my roof at the time. My primary home defense arm is a Ruger Mini-14, with several 20 & 30 rd. magazines. I purchased a great deal of SP & HP ammo for each firearm, especially the .223. One of the reasons for selecting the Mini-14 was the cost and availability of ammo at the time. It digests the current military caliber, which if the crisis were to last a while, supplies could be "located." Another reason was that we were then living under the Clinton Assault Weapon Ban, and Mini-14s were not on the bad gun list.

I still have other items in my "Ship Hits The Sand" kit, including wind-up radios and flashlights (no batteries needed), four FRS walkie talkies (rechargeable), misc. camping and survival gear, and one all-wheel-drive Subaru Forester.

The area I live in has a few earthquake faults, and we have an excellent view of Mt. St. Helens from our living room, so our most likely threat is natural. However, we live about 20 miles from Portland, with its big city crime and huddled masses yearning to be fed.

At the time I stocked up in 1999, I was still a cop, but had decided that my family was to have priority, as did virtually all of my colleagues. Anyone who thinks the government will be there to protect and help, consider that and consider what happened in New Orleans.
 

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Yesterday, there was a similar survey on Yahoo. "What Five Items Would Stock For An Emergency". Of all the responses I checked, only one mentioned a firearm. I bet I turned some heads when amongst my list was: #5 "A firearm For Each Adult With Plenty Of Ammo. (500 rounds per gun)" Hah, take that all you liberals.
 

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I'm fast becoming too old to survive a "Road Warrior" type society. I'll just bend over, put my head between my legs, and kiss my butt goodbye, i reckon. I ain't too worried about food. I can fish and hunt around here, don't live in a big city. I kinda wish I had a nice sail boat to rig out for travel. My old man was into sailing and taught me on his 27 foot Catalina. Wouldn't want too much boat, just me to sail it, but something with a nice cabin to survive in. Wouldn't need gas. There are some very, very remote places around here you can get to by boat that abound in game and fish. Too, some HUGE ranches. Why starve if you can't find a deer, just take a calf. I mean, if it gets to that point, Road Warrior style. But, I couldn't get to those places without a boat and gas might be scarce. I can fish right in front of my house, though, and there are lots of ways to fish using more productive methods than hook and line. There's only one law in a Road Warrior society, the law of force.

I think everyone thinks such things. I mean, when I was younger, there was the soviets and total nuclear war. Now, there's Al Qaeda to scare folks. Then there's just the overpopulation of the planet beyond carrying capacity (experts say we're almost there). You turn on Discovery Channels and we're being killed by asteroids, super volcanoes, mega tsunamis. I mean, it's DOOM MAN! ROFLMAO! Fun to think about, but I doubt I'll have to worry about it. Al Qaeda is the major threat I suppose, considering this nation doesn't seem to have the stomach to win a war anymore.

I don't live in a large city. My town has 12,000 folks and there's probably another 20K in the whole county. The Katrina caos couldn't happen here on that scale. Oh, there are low lifes here, just not THAT many and most of 'em actually work for a living. We have danged few welfare trash. I went through a "Katrina" when I was a kid, they called it "Carla". We ran inland 150 miles and still got 120 mph sustained winds. It tore the place up around here, but we all survived. Life went on, and ya know what? We didn't have a FEMA or that. We did it all on our own! Imagine that, rebuilding without the government.
 

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Imagine if you had 5 minutes to evacuate your house.

Right now, QUICK!!! Get up from your computer and do a walk through and write down everything you would take if you had a vehicle and a separate list if you had to go on foot (but the catch is, you have to do this in under 5 minutes).

It isn't that easy, but with practice and planning you can make a real serious do-able list.
 

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My neighbor keeps a clamshell luggage carrier on the ceililng of his garage with clothing, toiletries etc. so he just needs to put the family in the van, lower the carrier and attach it, and go.
Went thru 3 hurricanes in two years a little while back.
The first was Frances. Took out power for 7 days, knocked out the phones and cell phone towers and took out the traffic lights for about 1 month. We had looters coming up from Dade County (I live in Palm Beach County) that were hitting the evacuated houses and busineses. After about three days or so, the police showed up and caught them. Never saw any National Guard, we were left to fend for ourselves. Charlie hit the west coast about two weeks before we got hit. All the federal relief went there. When we got hit, there was nothing left to send. Jeane hit us two weeks later and set everything back to square one, but this time we only lost power for 5 days. Local authorities were better prepared as they were already in crisis mode.
Next year Katrina hit New Orleans. Several weeks later, Wilma hit us. Whatever federal aid there was, went to NO, and once again, we got skipped over. But, at least we had all learned. We had no power for about 10 days and lost all traffic lights again for about 1 month, but now we were ready. We knew we couldn't rely on the federal government for help and the organization on the local level was much better. People were better prepared as well with generators and supplies. By this time, my wife and I had armed ourselves. It still wasn't fun sitting in line for gas in the pitch dark with a pocket full of cash (credit cards don't work without electric) and a gun under your seat at 5am. but it beats being without one.
The lesson is this: You need to make your own preparations. There are times when no one is there to help you, and some people are there to hurt you.
Whatever government assistance there is will be on the local level. Ours is now on the ball. Hopefully yours is too.
 

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Jkwas - Have you considered bulk storage of gasoline? Any time I consider it I'm always spooked by the spoilage and varnishing issues.

Jkwas said:
My neighbor keeps a clamshell luggage carrier on the ceililng of his garage with clothing, toiletries etc. so he just needs to put the family in the van, lower the carrier and attach it, and go.
Went thru 3 hurricanes in two years a little while back.
The first was Frances. Took out power for 7 days, knocked out the phones and cell phone towers and took out the traffic lights for about 1 month. We had looters coming up from Dade County (I live in Palm Beach County) that were hitting the evacuated houses and busineses. After about three days or so, the police showed up and caught them. Never saw any National Guard, we were left to fend for ourselves. Charlie hit the west coast about two weeks before we got hit. All the federal relief went there. When we got hit, there was nothing left to send. Jeane hit us two weeks later and set everything back to square one, but this time we only lost power for 5 days. Local authorities were better prepared as they were already in crisis mode.
Next year Katrina hit New Orleans. Several weeks later, Wilma hit us. Whatever federal aid there was, went to NO, and once again, we got skipped over. But, at least we had all learned. We had no power for about 10 days and lost all traffic lights again for about 1 month, but now we were ready. We knew we couldn't rely on the federal government for help and the organization on the local level was much better. People were better prepared as well with generators and supplies. By this time, my wife and I had armed ourselves. It still wasn't fun sitting in line for gas in the pitch dark with a pocket full of cash (credit cards don't work without electric) and a gun under your seat at 5am. but it beats being without one.
The lesson is this: You need to make your own preparations. There are times when no one is there to help you, and some people are there to hurt you.
Whatever government assistance there is will be on the local level. Ours is now on the ball. Hopefully yours is too.
 

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I keep the van pretty full during hurricane season. I can get from mid coast on the bay in Texas to Dallas on a tank. Good 'nuf, I figure.

5 minute get out, survival belt with Taurus 66 and ammo, .38 and .357. I put a post of it on here somewhere. I'd fill the canteen. I'd get my day pack, take out some of the pure hunting stuff, put in canned goods I have in my kitchen. I'd have the basics covered. Then, I'd grab my camp bag (tent, sleeping bag, pad, lantern, one burner stove, and a couple bottles of propane inside. I'd either jump in the van or hop on the Goldwing. If I had time, I'd also break down my 20 gauge double and stuff it in the wing's trunk with some AA 7 1/2, #3 buck, and slug loads. And, given time, maybe a fishing rod and my wading belt.

Really, it depends on the emergency, right? Just a hurricane coming, I've already practice this multiple times, latest was Rita's evacuation. Hurricanes are routine around here. It ain't Florida, but then, it ain't New Orleans either.
 

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"Jkwas - Have you considered bulk storage of gasoline? Any time I consider it I'm always spooked by the spoilage and varnishing issues."
Local laws only allow 20 gallons stored, but I fill up 8 5gallon jugs before a storm. That gives me 40 gallons plus I top off the tanks in the cars. I use fuel stabilizer in about 4 of the jugs, then after about 1week after the storm passes, if it doesn't hit, I just put it in the cars. Then I sit on the other 4 until the season is over. Use it in lawn equipment etc. Luckily, I haven't had to fill up yet this year. Hopefully it will stay like this. If I run my generator for 4hrs in the morning, and 4hrs in the evening, just enough to stop food from spoiling in the fridge and giving us a chance to have some light and TV in the evening, I use 4 gallons/day. I have one of those propane camp stoves for cooking and heating water to bathe with. If you don't have one, you should. A 1lb cylinder lasts about a week.
 

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Gunboards.com has a Preparedness section that I wander into every so often. Since its along the lines of this thread, figured I'd post it. There's many people there who prep for hurricanes every year. Don't forget the Stickie's at the top.

http://www.gunboards.com/forums/forum.asp?FORUM_ID=75

Steelheart
 
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