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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Yall, just throwing this out there. Has anyone elts been wondering if a curcuit judge could be turned into a money pit that would end up looking and more importantly sounding like a KAC model R-2 supressed revolver rifle i am aware of the moisin nagant (forgive misspellings) suppressed revolver also and the telescoping amunition used by both as well as the german S&W suppressed rig that encloses the cylinder in what appears to be an insulated clamshell that looks like the revolver has car doors on it. not interested in any mischief and i am quite certain that with the right paperwork and enough loot a home built critter like this could be registered and owned legitimately im looking for something that wont disturb the neighbors while also being humane and certain with something as big as a coyote at as much as 200 yds if im feeling ambitious. also if anyone has any creative ways around the oddball telescoping gasket ammo cylinder gap problem it would be great if this rig could be effectively quiet useing factory loaded cowboy rounds and without looking like a mazzerati with seagull doors making a german spectacle of itself
 

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Revolvers require a barrel-cylinder gap, as you mentioned. The Nagant revolver uses a relatively low power round, and the cylinder advances as it rotates into firing position, using the specially modified round to seal that gap.

Pressures have to go somewhere. They will seek out the easiest path. Higher pressures in a Nagant revolver tend to crack the casing of the round. This binds up the revolver under some circumstances, and makes re-loading a much more interesting issue in other cases.

I don't think it practical to first invent, and produce, a cylinder that follows the Nagant process for another gun. Then, you'd have to develop a round of similar design to utilize the advancing cylinder. It could be done, but it would be pricey.

Now, suppressing a shot load could also be problematical. The shot would eventually plug the ports for the gas into the suppressor. How soon, and how much, would depend on the size of the shot, and the size of the suppressor inlets. Firing a .45 Long Colt, or a slug, into a partially plugged suppressor could also be problematical.

Adding a suppressor to the barrel is the easiest part of the job.

The German suppressed revolver was a S&W Model 625. It was built, IIRC, for the GSG-9.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for taking my question seriously the more i think about this the more it seems like a gas driven sleeve in the cylinder that moves foreward around the forcing cone is the direction i would go but at that point i would have to sleeve the whole critter down to another calibur to make room for the works possibly .44 mag or .357 mag but thats not my beloved dream whispering .45lc anymore as much as i love taurus im thinking that its something im gonna have to build from scratch if at all but it is something i would love to see on sons of guns
 

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You can suppress a Dan Wesson revolver and they were made in .45 COLT and .44 Mag at one time.

Most Dan Wesson wheel guns have an interchangeable barrel system that allows the shooter to unscrew the barrel and change it with another. To suppress one, you'd merely need to thumb the hammer back and screw the suppressed barrel tight against the cylinder face. BUT, you'd have to loosen the barrel before you prepared to fire the next shot to allow the cylinder to index.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
merely need to thumb the hammer back and screw the suppressed barrel tight against the cylinder face.
as long as fiddling with it like that didnt somehow cause it to go off in your hand. could a PTFE gasket on the forceing cone possibly contain some of that blast
 

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as long as fiddling with it like that didnt somehow cause it to go off in your hand.
How's it going off in your hand? Gun's don't just 'go off'. Just like always, keep your finger off the trigger.

You twist the barrel slightly to the left- just enough to break contact with the cylinder face, thumb cock the gun (that lines up the next chamber in the cylinder with the barrel), then twist the barrel slightly to the right until it stops to reestablish the seal. A cylinder gap is only around .006" and even with the fine threads on Dan Wesson barrels (I've owned 2 of the guns and half a dozen barrels for the last 20 years), The difference between being able to turn the cylinder or not is miniscule. We aren't talking about a complete 360 degree turn of the barrel, merely enough to break contact so the cylinder can be indexed.

I've seen a couple DW's done like this. As a matter of fact, there was one on one of the History Channel shows featuring Ian Hoagg as the firearms expert.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
quite correct sir guns do not just go off except for rem 700's. but hammer back, loaded trying to manipulate the gun and apply torque to the barrel... alarm bells are ringing i can see myself mispaceing the one hand only to misplace the other in pieces i wonder if the two flat surfaces would flange tight enough to contain the cylinder gap blast i do like the simplicity of the idea though perhaps the forcing cone could interface with the face of the cylinder and that would improve gas containment
 
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