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This weekend I had a chance for a one on one conversation with The Director Of Customer Service and Repair for Taurus Int., Kimberly Intagliata. She told me about some changes at the Bull Pen and asked me to share them with y'all. Please see my post at http://www.taurusarmed.net/forums/firing-line/95242-great-day-pictures.html .

They are working very hard at Taurus to relieve the bottlenecks which are slowing up the turn around times with repaired firearms. One of the problems is when a customer has a firearm with a problem instead of sending it in for repair they call on the phone to talk with a customer repair rep. What this does is #1... ties up the service phone lines which causes (depending on traffic) wait times of 30 minutes and longer. #2.... when a repair gun is received at Taurus it is unpacked and sent to repair where it waits to be examined and then depending on the problem it is sent to a gunsmith who then looks for parts which all in all, increases the time for repair.

Now, what Taurus is attempting to do is this... there are always those who call in with a broken gun to "explain" what the problem is. The person who answers the phone then has to type in the problem and forward it to repair. There the complaint the 1st person has typed in is read again by a repair director, added to, and sent to a smith. When the smith receives the complaint it has already been through 3 people who typed what they "thought" the complaint was. Now if you have ever gotten gossip through 3 or 4 people's interpretation you know how easily it gets distorted. It makes a lot more sense to just include a note in the box with the gun and simply send it in.

The solution Taurus is attempting is this... They are changing the whole process so there are only 2 contacts.

First they are setting up a sort of triage system within receiving. As the gun is unpacked a regular gunsmith reads the note. He/she then determines what parts will fix the problem. If the parts are in stock the smith puts the gun and required parts in a bin and sends it right to a smith on the bench for immediate repair. If the parts are not actually on hand the gun is sent to where the parts will be available and then fixed.

At the same time, each smith is being equipped with a computer station at his/her bench. They are notified directly by triage in receiving that the gun is coming to them and when they get it and work on it they can then, by computer, update the status of any repair in real time.

The way Kimberly explained the process to me it made sense. Undoubtably, there will still be those that feel they have to verbally explain the problem and they will be able to do that. There will always be someone to answer the phone about problems. They should however, understand why that may increase the time necessary to get their firearms repaired.

Another thing, on a different thought.... please make sure your firearms are unloaded when sent in for repair. This sounds like common sense but understand that Taurus employs 2 full time employees in the receiving dept and their only duty is to unload firearms that come in loaded.

I hope I have explained these new changes that are coming.... I think Taurus is on track with this and I do think it will aid in speeding up the turn around time for repaired firearms.

Don
 

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Bangbang, "Another thing, on a different thought.... please make sure your firearms are unloaded when sent in for repair. This sounds like common sense but understand that Taurus employs 2 full time employees in the receiving dept and their only duty is to unload firearms that come in loaded."

It is truly amazing that people will send in a loaded gun!!!
 

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Thanks for the update, BB!
And, yes, I am amazed that someone would send in a loaded firearm as well.
 
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I understand the logic but, how do you get a return slip if it is warranteed without calling? Also, how would one possibly set up a replacement part purchase rather than sending a gun without calling. For example, my gun is 2 years old and I blow a recoil spring, I would rather order a $20 part than pay $50 shipping each way. These may be questions they want to answer before implementing a new process.
 
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At least they are trying. As far as the loaded gun goes, it happens to the careless. 3 months ago at the Dixie Classic Gun show in Raleigh (State fair grounds) someone walked in to the show with a shotgun in a case to sell. While removing it from the case to show a potential buyer, it discharged, hitting three people including the Security Guard standing near the entrance. Fortunately none of the wounds were life threatening. I had a clerk in a Pawn shop hand me a 1911 (handle first) last month that was fully loaded. Yeah, true story. I mentioned it to the owner whom I knew, not to get the clerk in trouble, but, I do go in there about once a month, and I no longer wear a bullet resistant vest.
 

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Please don't get me wrong. I applaud any company trying to streamline and improve customer service. I feel like they may be setting themselves up for a lot of extra guns to examine by not screening which ones come in and which may be better resolved by sending a repair part etc. If they have a policy of don't call just send it, they might have an awful lot of "This gun is innaccurate, it shoots low and left" sitting on the bench and a PO'd customer who spent $50 to send in a gun is told to firm up grip and adjust sight picture and practice trigger control. I would rather pay a phone rep $10 and hour to say that than a smith $20.
 

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When I sent my TCP in I ran a cable tie through the barrel and out through the ejection port (a la gun shows) and zipped it up so the poor guy that opened it wouldn't have to wonder. Frankly it would scare the crap out of me spending my entire day clearing weapons.

Yeah, phone calls are kind of pointless. But part of that is driven by people being unsure of what to do both as far as procedure on how to send it in, and also on whether they even need too. We've all seen posts here that ask "should I send it back?" when the obvious answer (to us) is "Yes" or "No".

The inexperienced are often unsure.
 

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At least they are trying. As far as the loaded gun goes, it happens to the careless. 3 months ago at the Dixie Classic Gun show in Raleigh (State fair grounds) someone walked in to the show with a shotgun in a case to sell. While removing it from the case to show a potential buyer, it discharged, hitting three people including the Security Guard standing near the entrance. Fortunately none of the wounds were life threatening. I had a clerk in a Pawn shop hand me a 1911 (handle first) last month that was fully loaded. Yeah, true story. I mentioned it to the owner whom I knew, not to get the clerk in trouble, but, I do go in there about once a month, and I no longer wear a bullet resistant vest.
You're a kind man Silverblackman! :)


I remember reading about the shotgun incident at the gun show. I think there were 1 or 2 other negligent discharges, at gun shows, around the country that weekend.
 

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per Glenwolde: "When I sent my TCP in I ran a cable tie through the barrel and out through the ejection port (a la gun shows) and zipped it up so the poor guy that opened it wouldn't have to wonder. Frankly it would scare the crap out of me spending my entire day clearing weapons."

I use soda straws, or parts thereof. When I stash my revolvers away, or take them for an "outing", they have a straw down the barrel that sticks out about two inches for a visual clue that they are empty. This also will prevent the cylinder from rotating. For semi-automatics, I slip a piece of a straw into the chamber and leave it sticking out of the slide at the ejection port. (I have mentioned that I'm a cheapskate before, right?)
For .22's, I just split the straw lengthwise to get it to fit into that small bore.
My gunsmith always smiles when he opens the case or gun rug.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I understand the logic but, how do you get a return slip if it is warranteed without calling? Also, how would one possibly set up a replacement part purchase rather than sending a gun without calling. For example, my gun is 2 years old and I blow a recoil spring, I would rather order a $20 part than pay $50 shipping each way. These may be questions they want to answer before implementing a new process.
I'm sure what they are planning is not a cure/fix all but it will help speed things up. When the triage in receiving gets a gun that has to be tested (like a "this gun shoots low" complaint) they will direct it to where it has to go. At the same time a gun with an obvious broken part can then be sent directly to a smith with the necessary parts to do the repair and not have to sit in the line waiting.

As far as ordering parts... it will speed that up by removing at least some of the people with repair guns from the phone line up.

It is at least worth giving it a try.

Don
 

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Being in customer service myself it is never a good idea to blame your customers for anything EVEN if it is THEIR fault. What she said was just plan stupid; she should have spun it differently at the very least.
 

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It certainly looks as though Taurus is doing their very best to make things right
for customers who are in need of repairs. And some common sense on the part
of the customers would go a long way to expedite things.

Am I being too naive in asking for common sense?!? :D
 

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I called Taurus for the first time just yesterday. The screw that holds the rear sight on my PT 1911 had fallen out, and I needed a new one. He put me on hold for a while, and when he came back, he said he had the screw in his hands and it would go out via UPS. So, he apparently went off and actually got the screw to make sure it was in stock. While that was great service, I’m sure there must have been a more efficient way for Taurus to accomplish that.
 

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Q: Why won't they just send me the parts?

A: One word, liability.

:r_c: They, Taurus, or any other gun maker, have no idea who we are, or what if any level of gun repair training/experience we have. In today's litiginous society, the only way gun companies can stay alive is to err in the direction of caution.

All it takes is one "lost" law suit to turn a thriving business into a vacant building.

 

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It would be "nice" if in this modern world of smarty pants phones with apps for everything if they could have an online "repair request form" that you could detail the gun, and attach photos of the serial number, the area of concern and a spot for the customer to write out the details of the problem they are experiencing. Then a team could sort the serious / obvious issues that need immediate return from the ones that may be caused by the loose grip nut. Those could get a set of detailed things to look at / try to see if it's a real problem or "low left flinch" etc. The issues that are real but rare, would take longer and might require a call back for details -- the form would include a customer number and time frame to call.

Just a thought!

By the way, the 740 is still chugging along spitting lead down range without a hitch and the raging bull continues to gore the targets. Worst thing I can say right now is that the last owner of the bull apparently didn't know that guns are not self cleaning :rolleyes:. Kept getting stuck brass in the cylinders until I spent an hour (seriously) with brush, cleaner, patches getting them to stop coming out black and brown! Yuck.
 

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The way I read what Kimberly Intagliata is saying makes sense to me. I think they will still continue to field calls and still talk to customers about problems they might have and accept orders for sell-able parts. Where I think the change in procedure that is being addressed covers those who believe they have a problem and are wanting to send the gun in for repairs. If you go to the Taurus web site, you can find the repair form at the bottom under Repair Policy. Click on it and you open up a widow explaining their policy. At the bottom of that page, you can choose from HOW TO USE OUR REPAIR POLICY, SHIPPING INSTRUCTIONS, and WORK ORDER. The work order form is the one she mentions sending in with the gun. Doing it this way makes more sense than explaining the problem to the rep, her typing what you said, the gunsmith reading the typed message and then determining the action needed. With each step, something is lost in the translation. If the owner types out his own repair form, it is considered 'first hand' information instead of 'third hand'. Look at it as a solution to a problem. The problem is too many people are handling one persons problem, thus causing more Taurus employee time. They are trying to address problems they see and that is commendable of them to do so. I hope it works out for them and if so, I believe we the customers will benefit from their improvements. What's not to like?
 
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