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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone else shooting cast bullets. If so are you sizing .429 or .430. I shot a few today at .429 on 15 yards. Some I just threw together. Groups weren't really that good. Maybe I will try the same loads with .430 diameter..Any thoughts..
 

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Before you go to the .430 bullets, think about the other variables involved. The powder that you used, the weight consistently of the charge, how the shot was made (offhand or benched), and the distance form the target. Any one of the variables could affect your accuracy when working up a proper load for your gun. You will have to experiment with different combinations until you find the load that produces thee best results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Before you go to the .430 bullets, think about the other variables involved. The powder that you used, the weight consistently of the charge, how the shot was made (offhand or benched), and the distance form the target. Any one of the variables could affect your accuracy when working up a proper load for your gun. You will have to experiment with different combinations until you find the load that produces thee best results.
Yeah,,t. ,that's my plan
 

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I load .430 cast bullets as that's what seems to be most prevalent. I'm satisfied with their accuracy.
 

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One way to know is slug your barrel. If the bullet is too small you'll have leading and loss of accuracy. Also the pressure needs to match the hardness.
 

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.430-.431 usually a little bigger is better than too small . i`m lazy and usually shoot lee tl430-240-swc unsized
as cast (and tubed of course ) . if anyone is a good enough shot to be able to tell a difference in accuracy from
a thousandth of diameter or a 10th of a grain of powder or two my hats off to you ---------
you should go poke around on Cast Boolits .its kind of the best
site for cast bullet info --not that folks here are not a wealth of info and ideas too ---
 
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FWIW, my 44caliber cast bullets are sized .432" for both my rifles and handguns. They are very accurate.
 

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I size my hard-cast SWC at .429, on top of a max load of 296, in my 10-1/2" Ruger SBH - and have excellent results, from a rest, far better than would be expected of old eyes and shaky hands.
 

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I size to .431 for my Contender.

In certain circumstances I've found that as little as .001" can make a big difference. If the cast boolit is too small it usually flies like a knuckleball and leads-up the barrel.
 

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Size, hardness and chamber pressure have to be considered. Focusing on one risks the others being a problem.
 

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You can easily determine the correct bullet diameter, but you'll have to do some measuring (or continue guessing). Slug the barrel, several times and meaure with mics. Measure the cylinder throats ( pin/plug gauges, expanding ball gauges or slugging). Make sure the cylinder throats are larger in diameter than the barrel groove diameter. Size (or purchase) bullets the same diameter as the cylinder throats. Properly sized bullets don't need to be to be any harder than wheel weight alloy, BHN 12 or so and don't fall for the "harder is better" idea. I have fired near max. 44 Magnum loads of 2400 and WC820 under properly fitting, cast 12-13 BHN plain base bullets over 1,200 fps in revolvers and 1,500+ fps in my carbine with no leading. Good bullet to barrel fit is the single most important part of cast bullet loads. This method has worked well in 9 revolvers I own...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You can easily determine the correct bullet diameter, but you'll have to do some measuring (or continue guessing). Slug the barrel, several times and meaure with mics. Measure the cylinder throats ( pin/plug gauges, expanding ball gauges or slugging). Make sure the cylinder throats are larger in diameter than the barrel groove diameter. Size (or purchase) bullets the same diameter as the cylinder throats. Properly sized bullets don't need to be to be any harder than wheel weight alloy, BHN 12 or so and don't fall for the "harder is better" idea. I have fired near max. 44 Magnum loads of 2400 and WC820 under properly fitting, cast 12-13 BHN plain base bullets over 1,200 fps in revolvers and 1,500+ fps in my carbine with no leading. Good bullet to barrel fit is the single most important part of cast bullet loads. This method has worked well in 9 revolvers I own...
Oh yeah,your right about all this. First thing I've got to do is get my hands on some soft lead to slug with.
I had to buy a whole box of round ball..lol
 

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Egg sinkers of appropriate size work well. I have used some in my 9mm and 38/357 barrels. Lead doesn't need to be dead soft, but care should be taken pounding a harder alloy through the barrel I have on occasion, when extra lazy, just used an oversized "normal hardness" bullet, usually around 12 BHN .If firing doesn't harm the barrel then pounding one through the barrel won't either. Just use plenty of lube and a brass or aliuminum rod, no steel!
 

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It's the crown you have to worry about..
. . . and forcing cone, and cylinder-to-barrrel gap, and . . . . .I O W, if accuracy is your aim, you should consider all the elements of the firearm, the ammunition, and the shooter.
 
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Hmm, lead, I’d likely use .430. I’d also check the barrel for leading. Also mind the temp of the powder pushing cast. Magnum powders like Lil’ Gun and H110 burn at around 5,400 degrees, probably 60-70% hotter than most powders. I’d stay away from the super hot powders unless you’re gas checked. Even then, mind the barrel temp. My Lil’ Gun loads get my barrel so hot you can’t touch it.

I’ve yet to slug a barrel. I load way too many rounds for way too many guns to even worry about that. Probably 26-28 different cartridges for many different guns for most cartridges. If it’s very far off spec, factory rounds will have an issue too. I’ve only had 1 bad gun, accuracy wise, a rifle that wouldn’t shoot anything in under 7”- 8” groups. Other than that, it’s either me (I can usually tell those days) or the sights being off.
 

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You can easily determine the correct bullet diameter, but you'll have to do some measuring (or continue guessing). Slug the barrel, several times and meaure with mics. Measure the cylinder throats ( pin/plug gauges, expanding ball gauges or slugging). Make sure the cylinder throats are larger in diameter than the barrel groove diameter. Size (or purchase) bullets the same diameter as the cylinder throats. Properly sized bullets don't need to be to be any harder than wheel weight alloy, BHN 12 or so and don't fall for the "harder is better" idea. I have fired near max. 44 Magnum loads of 2400 and WC820 under properly fitting, cast 12-13 BHN plain base bullets over 1,200 fps in revolvers and 1,500+ fps in my carbine with no leading. Good bullet to barrel fit is the single most important part of cast bullet loads. This method has worked well in 9 revolvers I own...
Yeah, you can do all that. It is a lot of work to do it for multiple revolvers though, and then you may need to make up custom loads for each of them. If reloading is as much your hobby as shooting, that's all A-OK. Me I reload to 1) keep ammo available during these cyclical shortages, and 2) to make shooting more affordable. It isn't my favorite part of the sport.

A simpler alternative is to powder coat your lead before loading it. You'll get the no-leading benefits with a lot less work. You'll get some of the improved accuracy benefits too - powder coating adds 1-2 thousandths to the bullet diameter as well.

Either way, reducing leading and improving accuracy are both good things.
 
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