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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello from Guatemala, Central America. First time poster.

I purchased a G3 a couple of months ago. But here is my story and question:

I owned a couple of Glocks a lot of years ago, both of them I ended up selling since since they did not fit my mindset at the time. I grew up around and carried hammer fired pistols only, having owned only DA/SA handguns in recent years. Some months ago I found about the Taurus G3 and really liked the specs, went to a LGS, handled the G3 and liked it very much so I ended up purchasing one. I like the way it feels in my hand and it is a very good and reliable shooter. However, after being used to not having to deal with a safety for many years I have failed to get used to operating one and believe me I have trainned diligently with the G3 but have found that I have missed disengaging the safety more than once. I would really like to make the G3 an EDC if I could learn to trust the internal safetys of the gun and just leave the safety lever alone. So here is my question: Is this a safe gun to carry without engaging the safety lever? Using an appropriate holster of course. Oh, I carry AIWB which makes this question even more relevant in my mind.

Any thoughts are highly appreciated.
 

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The G3 without using the frame safety is as safe as a Glock or any other striker fired pistol. If you are having trouble with managing that small safety on the G3, then try a few pistols with larger safety levers maybe...Oh and welcome aboard!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your responce and your welcome message :)

I'm having trouble with 2 things:

1. Disengaging the safety, or feeling confident that the safety will be disengaged when (hopefully never) needed.
2. Attempting to disengage the safety due to muscle memory when I'm carrying one of the DA/SA handguns with a decocker. One of the other handguns I use for CCW is a Grand Power K100 with a decocker lever for example.

I trust technology advances and think Glocks are safe guns as long as the user does his/her part and they are carried in a good holster. The one thing that was making me doubt about the G3 being "safe" as a Glock is the fact that the G3 is actually fully cocked when the slide is operated and the Glock is only put in half cock, at least that is what I understand.

Thanks for your input!
 

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One of the reasons I carry Taurus weapons (besides the low cost and good value) is the manual safety that they have.

The Glocks and other weapons that do not have a manual safety, have internal safeties that prevent it from firing if dropped. That's fine, but if you are involved in a gunfight, and you are in a panic with adrenaline pumping, and as you draw your weapon your finger squeezes the trigger, that gun is going to fire. That is why I want a manual safety.

When I am at the range, I practice raising my weapon to the target and clicking off the safety with every shot...WITH EVERY SHOT!
Is there still a chance that in the heat of a gunfight I might forget to click off the safety? Sure, but that's the choice I have made.

Recently I purchased a Taurus TH9C, which is similar to the G2C, but has a hammer and a decocker.
I carry it decocked, and with the safety on.
The first shot will have a longer/heavier trigger pull (about 9 lbs), and subsequent shots will be about 5 lbs.

The full size TH9 is about the size of the G3, but again has a hammer and decocker.
If I wanted to carry my gun with the safety off, I'd at least have it decocked. That way it would take a longer/heavier trigger pull for the first shot, which may be enough to prevent an unintended firing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your input 777Driver!

For over 2 decades I carried 1911's and felt comfortable with my ability to disengage the safety when needed, I did however always had big extended safety levers on those handguns. I purchased the G3 feeling I would be able to handle the safety as I thought that my years spent with the 1911s would make the task a no brainer once I trained with the G3. I however have found that I have missed the safety lever on the G3 a couple of times while training, and I train daily at least doing dry fire and practice fast draws.

I completely understand your position as it is a very sensible one. I on the other hand have chosen not to rely on my ability to disengage the safety all the time when needed as I have been proven that missing the lever is something that happens to me while training which will make me think it would most probably happen under real stress.

I have other guns I carry, it's just that I like the G3 A LOT and would really like to feel comfortable carrying it in the safety condition that makes sense to my experience.

Again, thank you for your input. I appreciate and respect all points of view.
 

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Engaging the safety and getting used to it is simply practice, practice, practice. You would soon get used to it and it would become second nature to you, if you choose to do so.

Welcome to the forum, from Texas ! :wave:
 
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Well, the G3 has a striker block, which Taurus calls a firing pin block in the manual, I believe. The striker block is removed from the path of the striker when the trigger is pulled. If the striker block is working properly, the G3 will not fire unless the trigger is pulled. It ought to be just fine in a good holster.

Considering the problems mentioned in this thread, it might be better to pretend that the G3 is the Glock that you and I both should have bought, and never use the safety.:D
 
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I never use a safety on a striker gun. My usual carry these days is a revolver. I ignore the safety on it as well, oh wait.................LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks for your input mwj999

That makes sense. The reason I was thinking the G3 would act diferently is that the G3 is fully cocked when the slide is operated vs the Glock that is not. I have not studied how the G3 action works, which is something I should have done before posting the question hehe.

I thought about purchasing a Glock instead of the G3 but the G3 just feels a lot better in my hand, plus it is half the price! :D

Ha! I have not read that thread. People complaining the gun goes bang when they PULL the trigger? Oh God...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Moken,
I thought your carry gun was one of those funky revolvers that have a grip safety, a s&W model 40 I believe ;)

But yes, I get what you mean.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I found a comment in a youtube video:

Here is the link to the video:

And here is a quote from the coment:

"As you know, when you have the slide off and upside down like in the video, if you try to move the firing pin forward with your fingertip to get the business end to stick out of the breech like it does when it strikes a primer, you cannot get it to move forward enough to stick out of the breech unless you also depress that little button in the slide that allows the striker to move forward. And of course, the only way to press that button in when the gun is assembled is to _pull the trigger_. This is the big fix from the original model: even if the gun is cocked and loaded and then dropped, AND the firing pin / striker manages to jar free when it hits the ground, the firing pin can only go forward as far as the striker block because it CANNOT go past it unless you are pulling the trigger. I.E. this drop safety prevents accidental discharges from the gun being dropped or otherwise roughly banged around."

Interesting!

Yes, I know I sound like the guy who is looking for a Doctor that will tell him what he wants to hear hehehe


 

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Great option for people on budget. Welcome aboard!
 

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I still believe that a five-pound trigger is too light to go without a manual safety. Five pounds for the average person's finger strength is light enough as to be negligible under stress. However, 12 pounds tips the balance at being significant for a finger to pull even under stress.

Training is training, muscle memory is muscle memory.

The training that could ensure the finger never gets on the trigger until the sights are on target is the same training that could ensure a well-designed safety gets flicked down.

A person who can't train to flick down the safety under stress can't be trusted to train to keep his finger off the trigger under stress either.
 

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Welcome to the forum! Having international members really adds to the forum.

Personally, I consider Glocks to be fundamentally unsafe for anyone who isn't a perfect being. Unless it's got a double action only trigger, I would never carry any semiautomatic without engaging the safety. Absolutely not.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Thanks for your input Ralph_Kirk

I understand what you are saying and yes training and muscle memory is the answer in most cases.

My problem with the safety on the G3 is not forgetting to disengage it, I have yet to do so. My problem is actually missing the lever. I understand that my posts have not been clear in what I mean by "missing the lever", so please allow me to clarify: When I said that I have missed the lever what I meant is that I try to disengage it but the lever is a bit small (perhaps for me) and I have brushed my thumb over it and have not positively disengaged it. If there was an option to install a wider safety lever that would fix the problem for me but I have searched and not have found one.

Believe me, for me this is not a problem of lack of training. I train at least 30 minutes a day and some days a lot more than that, I find it a great way to relieve stress as concentrating on my handgun training is great therapy. Yes, most of my training is dry fire but during the time I spend training a lot of if is devoted to the draw which in my mind it is probably more important than accuracy at self defense distances where even point or instinctive shooting will most times be effective. I practice at least 100 draws a day from different positions, I could say I have an obsession with having a consistently safe and correct draw.

I really like the G3, it is the first striker fired gun that made me want to own it, I find it to be an excelent gun and I won't even say "for the money" as I believe it is a good handgun regardless of cost. I love it, except for the safety lever LOL! Perhaps it is the size or shape of my hand, my thumb or God knows what but my anatomy is just not playing nice with the size of the lever and yes I mean the size as its position is actually OK for my hand.

One last thing, regarding your statement: "A person who can't train to flick down the safety under stress can't be trusted to train to keep his finger off the trigger under stress either."

With all respect allow me to say that I'm not a neuropsycologist but I would think that would not be a correct statement. One could be the consequence of the anatomic structure, too short or too long of a thumb versus the actual neural connection to keep the index finger from engaging the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for your post and your welcome GhostHorse. This has been my thinking and I have been carrying DA/SA pistols for that reason.

I'm just trying to be open minded to the possibility that the safe action/striker fired guns are actually as safe as they are supposed to be. Mechanically they do seem safe, today I finally understood the mechanics of how the G3 works and they do seem intrinsically safe as long as the trigger is not pulled back. But I'm still having doubts about it, I know that is a contradiction but it is how I feel. On top of what I feel about DA/SA pistols being safer I see that most of the guns being sold today are striker fired, if the striker fired pistols were so intrinsically unsafe I don't believe manufacturers would be pushing them as hard as they do.

I guess I'm just getting old and find it hard to trust new things, even though striker fired guns are not really that new :)
 

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if i were to carry it , i would do it with safety off. this is the only striker fired gun i have with a safety . i don't want to relearn flicking it off. what i do like about the safety is that it gives my thumb a place to rest just like when shooting my 1911 or 2011. it a plenty safe gun with the striker block, trigger drop safety and my trigger finger . just like a glock, mp and others
 

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Welcome from South Texas. Lots of people on this forum carry their striker fired guns with the safety off.
 

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Different gun, but my S&W MP 2.0 does not have a thumb safety at all. It also has the lightest trigger pull of all my striker fired guns, and I carry it alot. It made me a little nervous at first, not having a safety, but now I carry it often.
 
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