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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
.224 projectiles are rather scarce around here so I decided to buy a box of 100 Sierra 63gr. "semi point". "Semi point" was a new term to me but it's just a lead soft point.

The only projectiles I have used in this caliber have had a cannalure on them, these do not. Is there anything different that I need to do to use these projectiles.

Actually a second question. The barrel on my rifle is a 1:8 twist, the 63gr. should be a good match for that right?
TIA
 

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The twist rate and bullet should work well together. As for the cannelure question, just seat the bullet to the same OAL as you were with any other bullet you loaded for the gun and try it.
 
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You could always get a Lee factory crimp die, it will canteleur for you.
 
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I have the LEE factory crimp die, and I love it. 1 in 8 twist is going to stabilize everything except maybe the 90gr scenars, it will definately stabilize anything you can get in an AR mag if that is what you are reloading for. Mine is 1 in 9 and it seems to do good with the 75gr HPBT from Hornady.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You could always get a Lee factory crimp die, it will canteleur for you.
Perhaps my word use is wrong? To me the cannelure is the dimpled ring around the projectile. I realize the Lee Factory Crimp die crimps the projectile but it creates a cannelure on the projectile too? I know there are tools to create a cannelure on a projectile that does not have it.

My question was what difference, if any, will there be in making a cartridge with or without a cannelured projectile assuming all other aspects of the build are the same. I think guesser pretty much gave me the answer.
 

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I personally don't like the cannellure. However, when more bullets become available I will buy them if the non cannellured bullets are not available. When I have used cannellure bullets in the past, I seat them so my crimp is not even in the cannellure. My barrels like the bullets as far out the brass as possible.
 

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This is my understanding about the whole cannelure thing. The cannelure is positioned so the brass can crimp into the cannelure, there by gripping the projectile, more so than smooth projectiles, and not allowing it to walk out of the brass. The projectile walking out of the brass (could) happens due to recoil on high power weapons.
If two rounds loaded the exactly the same, but one used a cannelured projectile and the other a smooth projectile, then crimped. The cannelured projectile would create more pressure, when fired, to overcome the grip at the mouth of the case. This pressure increase could be a problem if reloading at the high end of the pressure range.
If I am mistaken, someone more learned than I will set me straight. Hope this helps.
 
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Depending on what you're going to do with the bullets, a cannelure can do more than just hold the bullet in place. 5.56 and 223 rounds driven at sufficient velocities (right around 2700 fps at point of impact) will generally fragment right on the cannelure line. Makes sense if you think about it - the metal's thinner there. Anyway, that's supposed to be a good thing for SD rounds.

I would think for target rounds the smoother bullet would probably be a better choice. The 69 grain Sierra Matchking doesn't have a cannelure but you see some pretty stellar performance out of them. To me it seems like you'd get smoother airflow over a smoother surface, but I don't have any science to back that up.

I've only had one round get pushed back in my AR, and it was a bullet with a cannelure. If the nose of the round gets in the wrong position with that big AR spring driving the bolt carrier forward, a cannelure isn't going to stop it from pushing the bullet back. Might help in some other types of rifles, though.
 
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