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I know in the past we have all chimed in to solve the problem disagreements of the world such as, which direction does a roll of toilet paper belong on the TP holder.

Well, here is one that seems to come up here at the house more and more often. We so recycle paper, cans, plastics and such. However, if the product that was in the recyclable container requires more than a quick rinse I say it belongs in the trash. The wife however says to rinse it clean and it goes into the recycle bin to be recycled.

My side of the story is that if it requires excess number of rinses and large quantity of water it is no longer being socially green due to the needless waste of water which is a limited natural resource. There is cost, materials, chemicals as well as the maintenance man hours to be taken into account of the water. The water is also a product that depending on your usage you get billed for on a sliding scale monthly. In many cases you not only get billed for the water usage but also pay a sewer charge that is in direct correlation with the amount of water used and charged for.

The other side or wife side is that recycling is good and we all need to do our part to save the planet. Don't get me wrong, I love the planet.

But, where is the breaking off point as to which is the better choice to make for a better, safer, cost effective, decision?

***I have also seen a few news reports that tell of how much recycled products end up going to the landfill from the recycling plant for a great number of reasons.
 

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I know in the past we have all chimed in to solve the problem disagreements of the world such as, which direction does a roll of toilet paper belong on the TP holder.

Well, here is one that seems to come up here at the house more and more often. We so recycle paper, cans, plastics and such. However, if the product that was in the recyclable container requires more than a quick rinse I say it belongs in the trash. The wife however says to rinse it clean and it goes into the recycle bin to be recycled.

My side of the story is that if it requires excess number of rinses and large quantity of water it is no longer being socially green due to the needless waste of water which is a limited natural resource. There is cost, materials, chemicals as well as the maintenance man hours to be taken into account of the water. The water is also a product that depending on your usage you get billed for on a sliding scale monthly. In many cases you not only get billed for the water usage but also pay a sewer charge that is in direct correlation with the amount of water used and charged for.

The other side or wife side is that recycling is good and we all need to do our part to save the planet. Don't get me wrong, I love the planet.

But, where is the breaking off point as to which is the better choice to make for a better, safer, cost effective, decision?

***I have also seen a few news reports that tell of how much recycled products end up going to the landfill from the recycling plant for a great number of reasons.
Most of the cities and townships around here have ceased recycling, it's lately proven to be non-profitable for them. It's only good for the planet if the gov'ts make money at it.
 

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We are required to recycle here in Plano. We do it but most everything goes into the recycle bin anyway. We don't have a problem doing it but we seldom rinse anything off before depositing it in the bin.
 
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I know in the past we have all chimed in to solve the problem disagreements of the world such as, which direction does a roll of toilet paper belong on the TP holder.

Well, here is one that seems to come up here at the house more and more often. We so recycle paper, cans, plastics and such. However, if the product that was in the recyclable container requires more than a quick rinse I say it belongs in the trash. The wife however says to rinse it clean and it goes into the recycle bin to be recycled.

My side of the story is that if it requires excess number of rinses and large quantity of water it is no longer being socially green due to the needless waste of water which is a limited natural resource. There is cost, materials, chemicals as well as the maintenance man hours to be taken into account of the water. The water is also a product that depending on your usage you get billed for on a sliding scale monthly. In many cases you not only get billed for the water usage but also pay a sewer charge that is in direct correlation with the amount of water used and charged for.

The other side or wife side is that recycling is good and we all need to do our part to save the planet. Don't get me wrong, I love the planet.

But, where is the breaking off point as to which is the better choice to make for a better, safer, cost effective, decision?

***I have also seen a few news reports that tell of how much recycled products end up going to the landfill from the recycling plant for a great number of reasons.
You are in the most dangerous position, being right in a disagreement with the wife. Calmly say yes dear and walk away.
 

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There is recycling pick up here, but when and if they do ( there are assigned city pick up days) is another thing. We've gone 5 months with spotty pick up. Calling the right city department did nothing.

It used to be that if on garbage pick up day recycles were also gathered and by a separate truck. Then if not pick up on garbage day the next day was recycle pick up.

Then it went to if not picked up on garbage day then to MONDAYS. When that change took place is up in the air. Monday comes and goes and the recycle can is still full. SHEEEEESH! Getting rid of electronics is a major hassle as there are only two times a year when that takes place.... if it takes place.
 

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We recycle. It's either is burned or gets hauled to the dump. I don't waste any water and life goes on.
 

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On one hand, I've got a family member whose solution to the recycling issue was to rinse the cans, then load them with the dishes in the dishwasher if there was room. Kinda made sense -- cleaned the cans, didn't use any extra water. Kind of a win-win. That might be your solution, if you use a dishwasher.

For myself, I'm the same as you -- I'll give recyclable cans a quick rinse if it works -- canned fruit and veggies, and toss them into the trash if it takes more -- such as tomato paste.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
On one hand, I've got a family member whose solution to the recycling issue was to rinse the cans, then load them with the dishes in the dishwasher if there was room. Kinda made sense -- cleaned the cans, didn't use any extra water. Kind of a win-win. That might be your solution, if you use a dishwasher.

For myself, I'm the same as you -- I'll give recyclable cans a quick rinse if it works -- canned fruit and veggies, and toss them into the trash if it takes more -- such as tomato paste.
The dishwasher idea is not a bad thought, it wouldn't work in our house though. My loving wife believes in rinsing the dishes to the point of being as clean going into the dishwasher as what the dishes are when they have been run though a cycle and then removed. She would never think of placing something unclean, dirty or containing food particles in the dishwasher.

In our house the dishwasher is simply a place for dishes to congregate for a community shower and sauna before being separated and placed into the cabinet.
 

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You might get a dish brush, looks like an over-sized bottle brush. A little water and you will brush out most if not all of the residue in the container.
 
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like you said, how much is actually recycled. Until the cost of virgin plastics goes way up there won't be much economic incentive to recycle.

That said, like you I rinse quickly, but if it requires the washing on the level of the pots and pans I cook with, forget it.

For us its pretty easy, one big bin, take it out once a week.
 
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I drew the line on recycling LONG ago when it took me more effort to clean and prepare the item for recycling than it took to just chuck it in the garbage bin.
Sorry, if you want that item in pristine condition in the recycle bin, you can do it yourself.

And like has been said earlier, many major cities are no longer doing recycling. It just is to expensive.
 
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We do not recycle at my house.

Years ago (30 or so) we started recycling at work. We were paying $75 per month to have two recycle bins picked up twice a month. I told our boss I'd do it for $65 per month, but he didn't go for it. I talked to one of the guys who picked it up. I asked him where they had to send the paper (that's all we were recycling) to be processed. He said "the landfill". It was a way to feel good about one's self as well as a way for trash companies to charge a premium for trash service. I guess as long as everyone feels better, it doesn't really matter what happens once the trash goes out the door. After all, it is trash and we want rid of it.

Also about 30 years ago, I sent a recycle proposal to my state representative. I suggested that all trash in the state be hauled to our various state prisons. Prisoners should work 12 hours each day, seven days each week sorting garbage for recycling. The raw materials could be processed on site, or railed to a recycling center. This would solve our solid waste problems, our prison cost problems, and likely improve the recidivism rate.

I received the standard "thanks for writing" response letter.
 

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We do not recycle at my house.

Years ago (30 or so) we started recycling at work. We were paying $75 per month to have two recycle bins picked up twice a month. I told our boss I'd do it for $65 per month, but he didn't go for it. I talked to one of the guys who picked it up. I asked him where they had to send the paper (that's all we were recycling) to be processed. He said "the landfill". It was a way to feel good about one's self as well as a way for trash companies to charge a premium for trash service. I guess as long as everyone feels better, it doesn't really matter what happens once the trash goes out the door. After all, it is trash and we want rid of it.

Also about 30 years ago, I sent a recycle proposal to my state representative. I suggested that all trash in the state be hauled to our various state prisons. Prisoners should work 12 hours each day, seven days each week sorting garbage for recycling. The raw materials could be processed on site, or railed to a recycling center. This would solve our solid waste problems, our prison cost problems, and likely improve the recidivism rate.

I received the standard "thanks for writing" response letter.
That's actually a good proposal... Which is why it probably never made it far... :D :D :D
 
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We do not recycle at my house.

Years ago (30 or so) we started recycling at work. We were paying $75 per month to have two recycle bins picked up twice a month. I told our boss I'd do it for $65 per month, but he didn't go for it. I talked to one of the guys who picked it up. I asked him where they had to send the paper (that's all we were recycling) to be processed. He said "the landfill". It was a way to feel good about one's self as well as a way for trash companies to charge a premium for trash service. I guess as long as everyone feels better, it doesn't really matter what happens once the trash goes out the door. After all, it is trash and we want rid of it.

Also about 30 years ago, I sent a recycle proposal to my state representative. I suggested that all trash in the state be hauled to our various state prisons. Prisoners should work 12 hours each day, seven days each week sorting garbage for recycling. The raw materials could be processed on site, or railed to a recycling center. This would solve our solid waste problems, our prison cost problems, and likely improve the recidivism rate.

I received the standard "thanks for writing" response letter.
as much as I'd like to say I love the idea, it cannot work like you think. How much of that recyclable material can be used as weapons? That's probably why they sent the reply they did.
 
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