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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering what the barrel twist is on my 247g2 40 if anyone now what it..thanks in advance
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Warthog thanks but thats fot compact and i have a standard im sorry for not adding that important info if the twist is diff....because i was actually hoping it was a 1-14......the compct is 1-16
 
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All good gfort. :) When I posted it I noticed it was for the compact, but didn't know if it made a difference. That's why I said I hope this is what you're looking for.
 

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I doubt if the difference in a compact/standard/or long slide in a pistol length barrel would have a different twist rate?
especially in a value line brand.
Maybe in a rifle where the heavier/ lighter bullet being pushed to higher FPS and longer range shots but not likely in a pistol.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Right i know the compact is 1 to 16 and with a 180gr round leave the barrel around 975 fps and 165 grvleave around 1014.....but if it had. A 1 to 14 the fps would be aclittle greater but not really a large differences but i was hoping for the impact momentum impact. I really thank u for the info
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have officially found out the barrel twist on my weapon it is 1-6 every inch truns 6 times thanks for ur help
 
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I doubt that is the case. Twist rate is usually shown like this, 1:16, and that is read as 1 turn in 16 inches. Length of the bullet is the determining factor in twist rate. Longer bullets require a faster twist. A faster twist being a lower second number. For instance in the .223 Remington / 5.56 NATO a 1 in 12 twist is correct for a 50 grain projectile but you need a 1 in 7 twist for a 77 grain projectile. The 50 grain projectile has to be shorter than the 77 grain because the only dimension that can change is the length. The bore size is constant between the two. A 55 grain .223 bullet would be longer than a 55 grain .243 bullet because of the difference in the bore size. I hope that isn't too confusing.
 

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Look down the barrel with a light & follow 1 land of the rifling until it makes a 360 deg rotation then guess-ti-mate the distance.
 
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I really don't think twist rates will make a big enough difference in a 3"-4" barreled carry pistol compared to a 16"-18" rifle barrel for any of it to matter really. At that rate you wouldn't have a full rotation until the round is three to four barrel lengths away from your muzzle.

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I really don't think twist rates will make a big enough difference in a 3"-4" barreled carry pistol compared to a 16"-18" rifle barrel for any of it to matter really. At that rate you wouldn't have a full rotation until the round is three to four barrel lengths away from your muzzle.

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So essentially there's really no way to measure, the reason I ask is to try to narrow down which ammo grain would be most accurate
 

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So essentially there's really no way to measure, the reason I ask is to try to narrow down which ammo grain would be most accurate
Every gun is different. Typical lore is that 9mm pistols are built for 124 grain rounds, yet most SD ammo is lighter than that. Each ammo also varies in the powder and charge that the manufacturer uses. This is one of the reasons that many choose to hand load their own in order to determine which combination of projectile, powder, primer and charge produces the best result in their gun/s and even their handloads can have different results in different guns. Best answer if you are using factory is to try various ammo...124, 115, 147 grain and see how your gun shoots. Then hope that you can find your favorite in stock again. Good luck and let us know your results!
 
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Every gun is different. Typical lore is that 9mm pistols are built for 124 grain rounds, yet most SD ammo is lighter than that. Each ammo also varies in the powder and charge that the manufacturer uses. This is one of the reasons that many choose to hand load their own in order to determine which combination of projectile, powder, primer and charge produces the best result in their gun/s and even their handloads can have different results in different guns. Best answer if you are using factory is to try various ammo...124, 115, 147 grain and see how your gun shoots. Then hope that you can find your favorite in stock again. Good luck and let us know your results!
Yep, I have a ton of 147 I can't fire at ranges because the silver casings, but that's not range ammo anyway, just got a box of federal 124 though, from SGammo.com if you don't shop there I recommend checking it out
 

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Yep, I have a ton of 147 I can't fire at ranges because the silver casings, but that's not range ammo anyway, just got a box of federal 124 though, from SGammo.com if you don't shop there I recommend checking it out
I'm one of the hand loaders. The last factory ammo I bought in 9mm was IMI self defense rounds a couple of years ago. The most previous buy was .458 SOCOM which was PRICEY!!
 

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Every gun is different. Typical lore is that 9mm pistols are built for 124 grain rounds, yet most SD ammo is lighter than that. .......... Good luck and let us know your results!
CZ is correct! And to chase that rabbit a bit further. Every time the Mfg. changes something in the process, they change the lot number. Whether that’s a change in powder formulation, lot # of the bullet or case used, or even a change to some of the machinery.
Which means, even if it‘s 115 gr WWB, it may shoot differently from your gun due to a change in Lot #’s. (Theoritically)
So when you find something that shoots well, buy as much as you can afford, but don’t be surprised if you next purchase of that same stuff shoots a little differently.

And yes, I maybe picking nits.
 
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