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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, So I have a couple of vehicles with cloudy headlights. Both over 10 years old. One would be a bit over $400 to replace the headlight assembly the other a bit over $300. Well not wanting to spend the equivalent of a new Taurus firearm or two, I started looking for options?

I found a bunch of kits, the one I like the best I saw at Autozone for $35.00. Mothers® PowerBall 4Lights Headlight Restoration Kit

Has anyone used this stuff, does it work?

I don't care if it makes them factory new, just about anything would be an improvement.
 

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I just bought that kit not too long ago. I don't have a clue what the polish is but it works great. For all I know I could have bought the cheaper 3M brand ball right next to that kit and some cheap NuFinish. But it did buff the plastic to as close to new as I think you are going to get. The plastic is all clear again with almost no discoloration and haze. I guess I would buy it again.

EDIT: This is the 3M version that I almost bought. I don't know if there is a difference in plastic polish and car polish so I passed as they didn't have a bottle marked plastic polish.

Amazon.com: 3M 39008 Headlight Lens Restoration System: Automotive
 

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Mothers is a good reputable company. Also, in my flying days, we had a plastic polish we would use to polish the plexiglass windows. It would help improve the visibility on an old window. It was a specific product in a flat blue plastic bottle. I'm sure Airwrench or one of the other more recent pilots can name it.....maybe it's called Mirror-Glaze. You used to be able to find it at the good old time hardware stores.

I doubt you can restore the lens to original condition, but you sure can improve it. A good product will have just enough abrasive to polish the surface and clean it. Do one at a time, and compare the two.

The Mirror-Glaze also helped preserve the plexiglass. I.m sure if you gave the headlamps a good rub down every couple of years, they would stay looking showroom fresh.
 
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Thanks for this post! I needed the product info, because I have one lens on each of my two vehicles that has gotten quite hazy...
 

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If you've got an air compressor, you might want to consider one of these - 2" orbital sander. They sell foam pads for them, and they're variable speed. Use the foam pad with some polishing compound at low speed and you should be able to easily polish the haze out. And you can use if for all kinds of other stuff too. I've got one, and it's a great little tool. $25 at Harbor Freight. JAT

 

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I've been considering picking some up not for headlights but for a clear polycarbonate hockey shield that's been looking rough. I think I'll find a used one at Play It Again Sports to try it on. I don't want to make the problem worse.
 

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I wonder if this stuff would work to polish off small scratches on the glasses I wear. I guess I could try it on an old pair of prescription glasses that I no longer wear. Hmm.....
 

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While I'm thinking about it, here's another tip - toothpaste is an excellent fine abrasive. I used to use toothpaste to polish scatches out of plastic watch crystals, and it worked very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Mothers is a good reputable company. Also, in my flying days, we had a plastic polish we would use to polish the plexiglass windows. It would help improve the visibility on an old window. It was a specific product in a flat blue plastic bottle. I'm sure Airwrench or one of the other more recent pilots can name it.....maybe it's called Mirror-Glaze. You used to be able to find it at the good old time hardware stores.

I doubt you can restore the lens to original condition, but you sure can improve it. A good product will have just enough abrasive to polish the surface and clean it. Do one at a time, and compare the two.

The Mirror-Glaze also helped preserve the plexiglass. I.m sure if you gave the headlamps a good rub down every couple of years, they would stay looking showroom fresh.
I think you are right it was Mirror Glaze. Thats exactly where I got the idea, from an old Cesna 150 I used it on years ago. If I remember correctly it came in a small white bottle. I really need the abrasive stuff if the old bird was this bad, I would never have flown vfr! :D

Brings back memories, I learned to fly on that plane, foggy windows, speed tape and I think there was some bailing wire! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #12
While I'm thinking about it, here's another tip - toothpaste is an excellent fine abrasive. I used to use toothpaste to polish scratches out of plastic watch crystals, and it worked very well.
Ive used toothpaste for plugging up old nail holes when renovating houses.. never as an abrasive.. I'll have to try that...
 

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Good call on the TP (Toothpaste!), DB.
Luke, it should work on polycarbonate but I wouldn't think it would work on glass. Let the "class" know how it goes!
 

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I wonder if this stuff would work to polish off small scratches on the glasses I wear. I guess I could try it on an old pair of prescription glasses that I no longer wear. Hmm.....
Baking soda is about as strong of an abrasive as you should try. I never had very good luck trying to polish scratches in glass, and I even tried jewelers rouge.
 

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A product sold at automotive paint shops is called "Microfine 1,000" it is either a 3M or Dupont product. It is made specifically for polishing clear coat with a high speed buffer.
 

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I myself used a bottle of Turtle Wax liquid rubbing compound on my '01 Dodge Ram and it worked pretty good without spending big bucks.
Just rub it on hard let it dry and wipe off. If it's really bad you might have to do a couple of times.
 

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It really depends on how bad the headlight lenes are. I have a 2000 Nissan Sentra with plastic headlight lenes; Nissan (& therefore Infinity) are notorious for cloudy headlamps. I actually wet-sanded mine; I can't remember what I started with but it ocould have beed 240 or even 120. I finished up with maybe 1500, then buffed. They looked great; that was a few years ago & theye are about ready for another reconditioning.
 

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Toothpaste and a soft cloth.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It really depends on how bad the headlight lenes are. I have a 2000 Nissan Sentra with plastic headlight lenes; Nissan (& therefore Infinity) are notorious for cloudy headlamps. I actually wet-sanded mine; I can't remember what I started with but it ocould have beed 240 or even 120. I finished up with maybe 1500, then buffed. They looked great; that was a few years ago & theye are about ready for another reconditioning.
They are bad, I can barely see the bulbs in one and slightly better on the other!

I went ahead and bought the Mothers Kit, It was $25 and should cover head and tail lights for both vehicles. I plan on doing it this weekend. I'll let yall know if the stuff works. I plan on taking before and after photos.
 

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I've used the Mother's kit on my '97 ram before I replaced the assemblies and it worked pretty well. Once they're oxidized, it'll come back eventually, no matter what you do.

Here's a tip: once you get them clean, keep a coat of wax on them and it'll help keep them from oxidizing as fast. I use a spray wax on mine about once a month
 
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