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That is interesting, but it seems odd they would keep the very poorly designed stock trigger safety system, since that is the issue most people have problems with. I would also be interested in seeing them actually measure the throw distance of the trigger.
 

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I have the same click noise Galloway Precision addressed in their YouTube video and that is not the lifter. That's the actual trigger bar not fully seating forward. When you fire at the range the roil assembly will push the slide with enough force to properly push the trigger bar completely forward but dry firing will not. You will have to manually push the trigger forward with your finger. I only shot one mag with no failures because I didn't want to chance damaging the trigger bar. I'm planning on reinstalling the original trigger and may return or experiment with the trigger a bit. My gun was brand new. Put 50 rounds through it and then installed this trigger. I put one mag (12 rds) and did not feel comfortable enough to continue. I reinstalled it today (removing the the trigger blade) and it functions flawless. 100rds without a single issue. I can not recommend this trigger to anyone who wants the safety of the trigger blade. The design of the trigger will not allow the blade to be fully depressed so it hangs up and clicks after it finally forced it way through. If you dont want a trigger blade than this is a great trigger. Galloway Precision says it is a 20% reduction, I'm going to disagree. It's more like 10-15% but the actual trigger face is nice and feels amazing when you pull it. It's $10 cheaper than Keep Tinkering's trigger that also does not have a trigger blade so if you are more inclined to not having the trigger blade safety his is also another option. My only issue (theoretically because I haven't tried Keep Tinkering's trigger) is that in his videos they don't leave much room for meatier fingers.
 

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First off, that part in the install video where he has the trigger bar, trigger spring and trigger assembly together and out of the gun, and he flexes it all the way back and forth to test the function... Do NOT do that. Due to the geometry of the whole assembly these guns need every bit of spring force they come with to get the trigger to return all the way forward correctly and consistently, I can assure you that he has at least partially sprung that trigger spring, and that will cause issues. I mention this issue in several of my youtube videos for these guns and have had to walk many people through how to partially rewind that spring to restore the tension. I have actually considered making custom stiffer springs for these guns just for this reason.

Also, did you notice where he clamped down the nylon trigger in a toothed vice to change the trigger spring? That seems like a good way to waffle up those ends of the trigger pivot point and possibly distort material into that precision machined hole, both of which can cause issues with the trigger being stiffer and not coming all the way forward.

The second issue is that while the Millennium series guns are great, and I REALLY like them, Taurus does have a pretty wide range of tolerances on them, which makes it hard to make precision aftermarket parts that will fit all guns out of the box. This leaves you the option to have a lot of excess pretravel, and overtravel, like the stock trigger does, and have it work in 100% of guns, or to design your trigger in a way that minimizes pretravel and overtravel, but requires a small percentage of the triggers to be modified by end users who have a gun that falls on the far end of the manufacturing tolerances range. The first option gives a sloppier product, but requires less customer support, the second option provides a better trigger with less travel, but requires more customer support.

Whatever trigger you pick, I would advise MUCH more caution than that guy on the Asmund install video is showing, and I would suggest watching my install videos as well, and if you run into any issues with these guns, no matter where you got your parts from, feel free to contact me and I will gladly try to assist however I can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have no problems at all with the trigger on my PT111. I was looking into one of these for my uncle. He always complains about the trigger blade on his 111. Figured I would get feedback before mentioning it to him.

Thanks so far for all the info.
 

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First off, that part in the install video where he has the trigger bar, trigger spring and trigger assembly together and out of the gun, and he flexes it all the way back and forth to test the function... Do NOT do that. Due to the geometry of the whole assembly these guns need every bit of spring force they come with to get the trigger to return all the way forward correctly and consistently, I can assure you that he has at least partially sprung that trigger spring, and that will cause issues. I mention this issue in several of my youtube videos for these guns and have had to walk many people through how to partially rewind that spring to restore the tension. I have actually considered making custom stiffer springs for these guns just for this reason.

Also, did you notice where he clamped down the nylon trigger in a toothed vice to change the trigger spring? That seems like a good way to waffle up those ends of the trigger pivot point and possibly distort material into that precision machined hole, both of which can cause issues with the trigger being stiffer and not coming all the way forward.

The second issue is that while the Millennium series guns are great, and I REALLY like them, Taurus does have a pretty wide range of tolerances on them, which makes it hard to make precision aftermarket parts that will fit all guns out of the box. This leaves you the option to have a lot of excess pretravel, and overtravel, like the stock trigger does, and have it work in 100% of guns, or to design your trigger in a way that minimizes pretravel and overtravel, but requires a small percentage of the triggers to be modified by end users who have a gun that falls on the far end of the manufacturing tolerances range. The first option gives a sloppier product, but requires less customer support, the second option provides a better trigger with less travel, but requires more customer support.

Whatever trigger you pick, I would advise MUCH more caution than that guy on the Asmund install video is showing, and I would suggest watching my install videos as well, and if you run into any issues with these guns, no matter where you got your parts from, feel free to contact me and I will gladly try to assist however I can.

Don't know about this new trigger but I did install yours ( egad, what a job for big shaky hands ) and I say it's a must have mod if you have problems adjusting to the stock trigger. Other than the install, your trigger will be installed on a new G2C I'm planning on getting. I dread the thought of putting it on my bench and going thru that again but the end result is worth it.
 

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First off, that part in the install video where he has the trigger bar, trigger spring and trigger assembly together and out of the gun, and he flexes it all the way back and forth to test the function... Do NOT do that. Due to the geometry of the whole assembly these guns need every bit of spring force they come with to get the trigger to return all the way forward correctly and consistently, I can assure you that he has at least partially sprung that trigger spring, and that will cause issues. I mention this issue in several of my youtube videos for these guns and have had to walk many people through how to partially rewind that spring to restore the tension. I have actually considered making custom stiffer springs for these guns just for this reason.

Also, did you notice where he clamped down the nylon trigger in a toothed vice to change the trigger spring? That seems like a good way to waffle up those ends of the trigger pivot point and possibly distort material into that precision machined hole, both of which can cause issues with the trigger being stiffer and not coming all the way forward.

The second issue is that while the Millennium series guns are great, and I REALLY like them, Taurus does have a pretty wide range of tolerances on them, which makes it hard to make precision aftermarket parts that will fit all guns out of the box. This leaves you the option to have a lot of excess pretravel, and overtravel, like the stock trigger does, and have it work in 100% of guns, or to design your trigger in a way that minimizes pretravel and overtravel, but requires a small percentage of the triggers to be modified by end users who have a gun that falls on the far end of the manufacturing tolerances range. The first option gives a sloppier product, but requires less customer support, the second option provides a better trigger with less travel, but requires more customer support.

Whatever trigger you pick, I would advise MUCH more caution than that guy on the Asmund install video is showing, and I would suggest watching my install videos as well, and if you run into any issues with these guns, no matter where you got your parts from, feel free to contact me and I will gladly try to assist however I can.

Don't know about this new trigger but I did install yours ( egad, what a job for big shaky hands ) and I say it's a must have mod if you have problems adjusting to the stock trigger. Other than the install, your trigger will be installed on a new G2C I'm planning on getting. I dread the thought of putting it on my bench and going thru that again but the end result is worth it.
I have a second G2C and I'm thinking about installing one of Keep Tinkering's triggers just to compare them. I will say that even though I have the Galloway Precision trigger (only because I had hoped of keeping the trigger blade) Keep Tinkering's triggers look more attractive and after the price adjustment on Galloway Precision website now there is only a $5 difference. After the comparison I'll be ditching one of the triggers. Right now I can say that the Galloway Precision trigger without the trigger blade is a good trigger. But my main reason for buying it was so that I could keep the blade so it's already got a negative in my book because I had to take the blade out just so that it would function properly. My only request from Keep Tinkering is to explore colors. I would love to see a red and gray trigger. Mostly red.
 

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I should experiment with colors more. The supplier I use makes the best product I have found for strength, accuracy, and finish, but they only offer undyed and black.

I experimented with colors on my own, but they came out a bit faded and pastel looking. Red especially was pretty faded, so I didnt offer it. I should try again with multiple dye dips and color mixing now that I have a bit more free time.
 

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It will arrive tomorrow. $20 did it, my tight budget allows for $20, sorry, but $10 more has an impact. As for the blade, I would rather have no safety. Keeptinkering, I didn't realise you had one that kept the restrike, I do like that, though I've never had a centerfire need it, rim fire yes.
 

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It will arrive tomorrow. $20 did it, my tight budget allows for $20, sorry, but $10 more has an impact. As for the blade, I would rather have no safety. Keeptinkering, I didn't realise you had one that kept the restrike, I do like that, though I've never had a centerfire need it, rim fire yes.

Keep it in mind that the new restrike trigger ( if I understand it correctly ) will not shorten the pull as much as the SAO trigger will and for me the shortened trigger pull was what I was after. I can only speak for my G2 but after the install the SAO trigger pull weight was around 4 !/2 lbs. That's not exactly a hair trigger by any stretch. In other words, an accidental discharge from pressure on the trigger is highly unlikely IMHO..
 

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Yup, waste of money. No difference from the original that I can see. Thank you Keep Tinkering for the videos on YouTube, saved my butt. Didn't pay attention to the spring on the slide release, half hour of my life looking for it, and by some miracle, I found it. And after seeing that trigger safety and what it is, I left it out. So other than a little frustration and experience, and $20, I don't think I'm any further ahead. So, some day when I have an extra $30, I'll be ordering from Keep Tinkering. Always the way, try to save $10, end up paying $20 more!
 

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Well, gentlemen, Merry Christmas. I sincerely hope you've all had a nice X-mas and were able to spend it w/ your family, or some people/person whom you love and/or care about.

Anyway, I'd like to emphatically state my respect for those of you who have endeavored (succesfully, even!) to modify/switch your PT111 G2's fire control and/or trigger assy.

While I am extraordinarily comfortable 'smithing' (gun plumbing, really), assembling ('building') and modifying both the AR-platform and most Glock 9mm pistols, I am wholly unfamiliar w/ and purely virgin when it comes to working on the PT111 G2 pistol. Anything past a field strip and striker removal/clean/re-assy is untouched territory for me.

I am not opposed, outright, to work on my G2 - I'm just accustomed to adjusting for its rather loooong trigger pull. While I admire and even find attractive offerings from Keep Tinkering and the Galloway trigger, it's simply not something I'm likely to do.

Coming from a Glock-ish background, and being VERY used to and even warmly fond of the Glock stock trigger pull, the PT111's long pull initially had me throwing rounds low and left. Go figure. Small, striker-fired carry gun. Long trigger pull. Throwing lead low & left. Hmm. Seems mighty familiar. So, basically, I just adjusted my trigger pulling.

It does have a long take-up before hitting a 'wall'. The wall is what many of us (I'm assuming, mostly because this is how I do it, too) will automatically 'default' to taking up that slack prior to checking sight alignment, and firing w/ a slightly further-back pull past 'the wall'.

Again, hats off to you mad gun scientists who mod your trigger. A Glock 'mod' is basically swapping well-proven parts out. A PT111 trigger swap is a job. A committed, time-consuming job.

Good for you guys!
 

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And a PITA. I will say the break with this trigger is smoother than the stock trigger, but as for short pull, I don't see it.
 
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