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My father wants to get my mother a cc weapon. She is unable to use my tcp 738. It is way to hard with her arthritis. I would love some suggestions.
Thanks:)
 

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I actually find my pt 709 easier to manipulate than my Ruger LCP, but if the arthritis is severe, what about a revolver? Some are bulky, but if she would be carrying in a purse, less of an issue.
 

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I would think revolver too, because it's probably gonna be hard to rack a slide with the arthritis...
 

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My dad has ole authur....we tried some semi autos, but he just couldn't handle the slides. So instead of one semi auto, we went with two revolvers.
 

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or a 357 and use 38's in it. Then you can use all the 38 caliber rounds including the +p's.
 

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or a 357 and use 38's in it. Then you can use all the 38 caliber rounds including the +p's.
I agree - I prefer the revolvers designed for 357 - they have more "substance", and shooting 38's from them is very comfortable! I am geeze-ette and a revolver queen! I have arthritis and age-ing eye sight! I have a little semi pt22 that I love because of the tip up barrel but I take it to the range for fun time shooting, but most folks want more than a 22 for carry. For a carry piece (we can't get carry permits here in Maryland - too close to DC otherwise known as H_LL!!) maybe look into a Taurus 66. I just acquired a 23 yr old one in 6" for range work and I shoot only 38's thru it - it's wonderful! Very easy to hold, no snap or concussion with it - and I have pretty small hands. Here is a link for the 4" model 66: Taurus International Manufacturing Inc

I know that it might seem a bit heavy, but beware getting a revolver that is too short and too light - it will be difficult for your mom to control. There is a balance between weight and size that must be made by the person that is going to shoot it. If the revolver has nice heft, it just sits very securely in my hand and is actually easier for me to shoot accurately- and isn't that the "name of the game?" It never ceases to amaze me at folks that buy these firearms of very large caliber and very short barrels. One day last week at the range there was a guy next to me trying to shoot a snubby 44 mag revolver and he could barely hit the target center at 15 feet. Sheesh!! I guess as long as it was an elephant or a barn charging him it could probably hit it. Just my 2 cents worth!:angel:
 

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I agree - I prefer the revolvers designed for 357 - they have more "substance", and shooting 38's from them is very comfortable! I am geeze-ette and a revolver queen! I have arthritis and age-ing eye sight!

I know that it might seem a bit heavy, but beware getting a revolver that is too short and too light - it will be difficult for your mom to control. There is a balance between weight and size that must be made by the person that is going to shoot it. If the revolver has nice heft, it just sits very securely in my hand and is actually easier for me to shoot accurately- and isn't that the "name of the game?"
What she said.

I don't understand carrying a ultra light gun that is painful to shoot just because it's easy to carry. It's a gun, it's meant to be shot and if you shoot it, it ought to be shot accurately. If you can't shoot it long enough or often enough to become proficient, then why the 7734 are you carrying it?

"Steel frame guns are too heavy to carry," is one excuse that I don't buy. How much does a steel J-frame sized wheel gun weigh? I went over to the S&W site and pulled up 3 hammered DA/SA J-frames with the same barrel length to find out. According to S&W, a steel framed Model 36 is 19.5 oz. The Airweight version of the same gun (the Model 637) is 15 oz. Their Model 360 (.357Magnum Talo custom version of the same gun) is 13.3 oz.

That's a difference of 4 to 6.2 oz. That's not a lot when it comes to carrying it. Heck, I've had sets of work keys that weighed more than 6 ounces.

I don't think that novice shooters really don't need to even look at the light pocket guns because they are so hard to learn to control and become proficient with because they are so light and small. The increased felt recoil due to the light weight can- and most likely will- lead to them developing bad recoil management habits like flinching and milking the trigger. The short sight radius means that your mechanics have to be all that much better to get shots on target accurately. When you combine the two, you have a gun that's extremely hard to learn to shoot accurately.

You want some heft in a gun. The heavier the gun, the more recoil the weight of the gun will absorb. The more the weight of the gun absorbs recoil,means that the shooter's body has that much less to absorb. For example, shoot a factory 165gr .30-'06 from a standard weight rifle and then shoot the same ammo from one of the light weight guns like the Remington Model 7 that weighs about 25% less. The ammunition is the same, but the lighter gun will have more felt recoil.

That being said, most folks can't walk around with a Smith and Wesson Model 27 with a 8 3/8" full under lug barrel and conceal it. There's gotta be a compromise in size/ shooting comfort and the ability to conceal. That's going to depend on how low the shooter in question can go and still be able to actually shoot it accurately.
 
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My wife had the exact same problem. Her answer was to steal my S&W 686. I offered to get her anything she wanted in order to get the 686 back but nothing worked.

The closest I came to succeeding was with a Glock. No external safety except the trigger. Keep a round chambered and all she would have to do is pull the trigger. It almost worked but was rejected because it was "ugly".
 

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or a 357 and use 38's in it. Then you can use all the 38 caliber rounds including the +p's.
+2 on this. Or a Judge
cylinder 1: Bird shot
cylinder 2: buck shot
cylinder 3: PDX
cylinder 4: PDX
cylinder 5: 45lc
 

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Ohhh - JTG452 - GREAT post!! I agree 100+%!!! Maybe tservice's mom needs 2 revolvers - one first to become proficient with that's got some size and weight (there's no better feeling than consistently going to the range and seeing how your shooting continually improves!) and maybe later one that's lighter - maybe???:angel:
 
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