Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a Tarus 709 slim that has failure to extract issues. I was advised to try different brands of ammunition and 124 gr instead of 115 gr. I shot 50 rounds of 124 gr that worked fine. I've had other people reply to a previous post, and say they had the same problem and it eventually worked itself out. My Glock and Sig friends told me not to buy this gun saying thier would be problems with it. They claim thier guns (Glock or Sig) fire every time all the time. I bought the 709 for several reasons, the price was right, it's easy to conceal carry, and it feels good in my hand. Should I except that this gun might be finicky when it comes to ammunition ? This is my first new gun I just wasn't sure what to expect.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,168 Posts
You probably already have, but a good in depth cleaning of a new gun especially Taurus since the pack them with enough grease to lube a Mac Truck (JK to keep them from rusting on the Ocean voyage to America) will help out tremendously. Most guns do require a break in period.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gbusmech

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,557 Posts
Some guns are finicky to ammo. My PT145 will not shoot Remington green box ammo at all but will shoot anything else. Find the ammo your gun likes and keep using it. +1 on cleaning the gun thoroughly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,004 Posts
Could need a good cleaning, could need a different ammo, could need to exercised a bit more....but what ever it is, rest assured that it is a well built pistol. If you do have a problem call Taurus customer service and they will send you eveything you need to send the pistol in postage paid....fix it and get it back to you in quick fashion. The gun does have a Lifetime warranty, it problems appear, don't hesitate to use it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Some guns are finicky to ammo. My PT145 will not shoot Remington green box ammo at all but will shoot anything else. Find the ammo your gun likes and keep using it. +1 on cleaning the gun thoroughly.
Remington ammo and Taurus seem to not mix in my guns either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts
Some guns are more reliable out of the box than others. When possible buy a number of different ammo and see what it liked the best, avoid the ammo it doesn't like.

Personally I prefer 124gr bullets and even 147gr over 115gr.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,348 Posts
It happens to even the best of companies. Also, occasionaly, there are bugs to be worked out on new designs like the Slim series. Follow the given advice, and drop Taurus a line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36,457 Posts
I recently bought a Tarus 709 slim that has failure to extract issues. I was advised to try different brands of ammunition and 124 gr instead of 115 gr. I shot 50 rounds of 124 gr that worked fine. I've had other people reply to a previous post, and say they had the same problem and it eventually worked itself out. My Glock and Sig friends told me not to buy this gun saying thier would be problems with it. They claim thier guns (Glock or Sig) fire every time all the time. I bought the 709 for several reasons, the price was right, it's easy to conceal carry, and it feels good in my hand. Should I except that this gun might be finicky when it comes to ammunition ? This is my first new gun I just wasn't sure what to expect.
well let me just say that "some" people are fanatics to a fault over a particular brand of firearm!
and yes we have some here that are that way about the Taurus brand.
I doubt if problems are encountered by 1 % of gun buyers of new firearms, what happens is that the 1 % with a problem generally hollers louder than the 99% which have the same weapons that operate flawlessly, hence the old squeaky wheel gets noticed more!
I own, Colt, Beretta, Sig Sauer, Ruger, S & W, Savage, Para ordinance, Para USA, Browning and yes Tauurs.
I don't personally put one above the other in function, some may be prettier than the others but pretty don't usually save your behind in a jam.
If the gun fits me and functions i like it, if it don't function then i get it fixed or fix it myself.
don't matter but I have had more peoblems with new Beretta firearms than any other brand, and i have a whole lot more Taurus by the way.
Beretta made the repairs and so they are now functional guns.
Don't tell any of the Beretta guys i said anything bad about the italians!-LOl
 
  • Like
Reactions: bre346 and gbusmech

·
Moderator in Memorium 1940-2014
Joined
·
13,540 Posts
Here's another angle: Experience with my son's PT845 taught us that Taurus recoil springs are not necessarily consistent.
Since yours fed and fired 124gr (the recommended dose, by the way) without problems, I'd guess you have one of the stronger recoil springs.
I suppose it's possible it could weaken in time, but if you don't want to send it to Taurus right away, you should probably put another hundred or more rounds of 124gr through it and see if they give you any problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,955 Posts
Great advise from all.
Try White Box Winchester's....
My PT 145 loves that brand the most....

1.1 USA.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,011 Posts
1. Few guns, that us every day mortals can afford are put together hand hand fitted like the good old days up through the 1970's for premium branded guns. This means that parts that mesh or work together have to "wear in" and should do so with proper lubricant.

Springs are also a part of this same equation. New springs will initially relax with use when a firearm is new, and then settle in to a very long period of the spring strength remaining fairly constant. Also keep in mind, a spring at rest, either compressed or in it's normal uncompressed state will not lose strength. It is only the exercising of the spring which causes any loss of strength, and this happens very slowly over thousands of cycles.

At a thousand rounds or cycles, all guns begin to start hitting their sweet spot and will continue to do so as more rounds have been fired through them. I haven't shot but 4 1911's besides my own. When mine was realitivly new, it seemed to have a really good trigger and at the range, I was able to fire Smokewagon's PT 1911 with over 2,000 rounds through it at the time and that trigger was like butter and the feel of the gun through just handling was more like a glove.

I seriously believe today's guns improve with age and use. Sure, parts will break and wear out, if you shoot more than the average bear, but that is why they make parts

2. Along with the fact that guns are not hand fitted, they are otherwise made with CNC mill machines (Computer Numerical Code for those of you who always wondered but were afraid to ask), injection molded plastic or MIM metal parts. Two things happen, mill dust doesn't get cleaned out real well and winds up in less than useful places, and mold mark edges are not smoothed down real well and flash can also break off and wind up in less than useful places, so cleaning the internals you can easily get to is not a bad idea.

3. With semi-autos, there is a feed ramp just below the bottom of the barrel. This is a guide for the bullet as it is stripped from the magazine and fed into the chamber. Many manufactures today, do a good job of polishing this feed ramp, many do not. A few will shine like mirrors, some are shiny and others are dull. Most feed ramps are integral with the barrel, some are part barrel and part frame. Shooting a lot of fmj helps smooth up a feed ramp as each bullet cycled will deposit an amount of metal into the micro crevasses in the (usually steel) metal of the feed ramp. I do a fluff and buff on every semi I buy with a Dremel and polishing cone coated with Micro fine or any other good automotive cleaner wax. As a result, even wide mouthed hollow points work pretty good from the get go.

4. As mentioned, any imported firearm will have protecting coating and usually, the protectorent coating will be pretty stiff. Try dipping anything in syrup and then let it harden a few days and see how well it works.

Overall, good cleaning, proper lubricants and use will eventually give the feel of a Swiss watch with most firearms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
congrads on your 709. Have your friends to check some of the glock and ruger forums for they have had some of the same fte's with some brands of ammo. also winchester developed a powder (wap) for their factory 9mm and 40 s&w ammo. for higher vel and lower recoil which may be the reason for so many fte with the white box winchester ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Agreed! Remington FMJ is the ONLY ammo ever to cause a problem in my Ruger or CZ semiautos, and the only one to choke my friends Glock 19 as well. I'll shoot Remington out of a revolver if the price is right, but no more semiauto Remington rounds in my pistols!

Remington ammo and Taurus seem to not mix in my guns either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Agreed! Remington FMJ is the ONLY ammo ever to cause a problem in my Ruger or CZ semiautos, and the only one to choke my friends Glock 19 as well. I'll shoot Remington out of a revolver if the price is right, but no more semiauto Remington rounds in my pistols!
Hah, that's funny. My 738 will ONLY feed Remington green box, peroid. Yep I've tried most brands and it only eats Remington. It's weird how different guns like (or dislike) different brands of ammo.:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
To the OP about break in of new guns. I believe this started bout 10 - 15 years ago. Before then you bought a new gun and right out of the box they fired fairly true and would eat anything you fed them. If they didn't, hit them with a file or sand paper here or there and then the gun would run flawlessly. I don't understand what happened (it may be in the machining process as other replies mentioned, that makes sense to me) with all this "you have to shoot 500 rounds to break them in" stuff. All brands have started saying this so it isn't just a Taurus thing. Part of the problem on the compacts is the feed ramp has to be soooo steeeep to keep the over all size short that a lot of ammo can't slide up and then flatten back down to slide into the barrel without the casing hitting the chamber lip and catching a little and it doesn't take much to cause a jam. So I guess in today's world you must spend $300 - $500 on a new pistol and then plan on spending $150 on ammo to break it in. While it is fun to burn 500 rounds of ammo, I'd rather do it because I want to and not because I have to to make my gun run right.

And yes, I do feel better now.:)
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top