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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to hear opinions on them, as that's the next toy on my list of things to buy.

Against my normal process, (de-prime and clean brass the day after going to the range), I went two weeks and then spent the entire day yesterday in the shop prepping and cleaning nearly 700 cases which included having to chamfer out the crimps and size/trim a few hundred 5.56 and 9mm NATO cases, all done with hand tools. Went to bed last night with very sore hands/fingers and woke this morning with tendonitis in my shooting arm. On a positive note, I did manage to find 2K LPP's and three pounds of powder last week.

This was what I had left after finishing 40 cal and 32 auto which was in the tumbler.
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Yes, processing a lot of brass like you did can be a royal PITA alright. It's very satisfying once you're done but the price we pay is, like you mention, sore & arthritic hands & arms afterwards. Don't have a prep station but can see how one would lighten the load a bit but they're a bit over the top, price wise, for what they are & do.
 
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This is what I use Hornady Case Prep Trio , because I always thought those which had a horizontal ‘deck‘ would eventually end up with brass in the bearings/bushings. I just open the top drawer on my bench and put a Folgers coffee can under the case prep to catch the brass filings. It’s several years old, only problem was it stripped a plastic gear within the first year. I called, they sent a label and 7 days later I had it back good as new. No problems since and I’ve done thousands of cases.
 
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Here's the one I'm using. I did buy a Lyman carbide trimmer not long after I got it. Works great for longer bottle neck cases, pretty sure the 300 BLK is too short.

 
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I also use the Frankfort Arsenal prep unit. It has saved me lots of time and sore hands. I have tried several times to find a carbide trimmer for it, but no joy so far. I have worn out the orginal trimmer, but replaced it with a standard. hopefully a carbide one will become avaliable before my next marathon session.
Here's the one I'm using. I did buy a Lyman carbide trimmer not long after I got it. Works great for longer bottle neck cases, pretty sure the 300 BLK is too short.

 

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I am using the Lyman. I had a few thousand empty brass until they were stolen with my guns...all prepped and primed. I will have to wait to replace them. I can't find enough of anything to order, but, I still have a lot of loaded stuff to tide me over. I don't remember how long it took to prep them all but I did it while watching movies on You Tube movies on my computer. It took a while but nowhere as long as when I was using the hand cramping hand tools.

That said, even a case prep tool will give your hands a workout and cause pain if you work at it too long. I graduated to the Lyman after so many years of using the hand tools. One nice thing about the Lyman is that the cutting tool (looks like a screwdriver) Lyman puts out for deburring the flash hole on the inside will fit the Lyman case prep stand. I still get cramped hands using some stations, depending on how tight I have to grip a case, how big diameter the case is, and whether the cutter is one that is prone to diggin in and spinning the brass between my fingers. I have to turn off the machine, free the brass and then start again.

I am 70 and my hands are weak anyway. A younger and stronger person can probably work without too much of a struggle. I like the way it is set up. Several stations that can be outfitted with the bit you need first, closest to you, then the next and the next, clockwise until you are out of stations. Screw in and screw out, ezpz. They even send a little patchbox full of silica, for case necks., brushes to clean case necks and all the basic bits and cutters you will need.

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That's one of the reasons I shifted to wet tumbling years ago. It eliminates one of the processes that these prep stations do & that is it cleans the primer pockets but you have to deprime 1st as a separate process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the ideas guys. I'll get on YT and see if I can find some videos of those and decide which to get.
 

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That's one of the reasons I shifted to wet tumbling years ago. It eliminates one of the processes that these prep stations do & that is it cleans the primer pockets but you have to deprime 1st as a separate process.
I prefer the wet tumbling after decapping, to clean the pockets, over the primer pocket scraping on the machine. Is that what you mean?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Pricey little sucker, especially for being made in china.
I haven't tried the carbide cutters yet, but the standard cutters are under $20 a piece and last a long time. I'm still using the one that the tool came with and have trimmed over a thousand pieces of brass with it. If it wears out in the center as a result of having to trim 223 brass several times, it'll still be useable for 38/357, 44 and my 500 mag brass which I typically trim only once.
 
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