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I don't like the look of that "sharp edge" of the flat gripped 1911 most everyone else seems to love.

I feel the arched mainspring housing "looks more graceful" and would be less apt to snag clothing during carry.

Am I alone here?
 

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I prefer the flat.
It is more comfortable for me and I shoot more accurately with it.
It's just personal preference.
I've never carried a 1911 so I can't comment on that.
 

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If the pistol has a short trigger, I like an arched mainspring housing. If it's got a long trigger, I prefer a flat mainspring housing.
 

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I prefer the ached, I have always shot better with that. It just seems to fit my hand better, and that is just a personal preference. I think it all depends on what you shoot better with and feel comfortable with. Otherwise, no functional difference. I had a mid-length trigger with trigger-stop screw.

I've carried the (arched) 1911-A1 in the past and had no trouble drawing it though I've never CARRIED a flat one. I carried it in a hard, high-ride, thumb-break leather holster, I believe it was a Bucheimer "Federal Man".

But then I discovered the S&W Model 39, and have never looked back. Other 9's, .357's, and 38's since then.
 

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I like the arched- it raises the muzzle higher and makes it easier for me to find it on the initial presentation.

That being said, it does change the trigger reach so long triggers can be too far out for reliable finger placement.
 

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Arched for me, points more natural. I'm used to revolvers.
 

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Has nothing to do with looks for me. Strangely, I find the arched more comfortable, but I shoot the flat better... so make mine flat.
 

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For shooting one handed an arched msh is king. That extra palm swell helps lock things down if you only got one hand on the gun. Shoot a flat one with one hand and it will flip more and be less predictable to have lined up the instant the slide closes. Seems to dip a little bit less predictably making it take an extra quarter of a second to line up the sights if that makes sense. Common practice nowadays is to always shoot with two hands and for that a flat msh is a big improvement. You can wrap around the grip a little tighter with a flat one which can speed things up a bit. I'd say flat is the way to go unless you plan to have a flashlight or phone dialing 911 in your off hand in which case go arched(with a lanyard loop to protect baseplates). Either way if snagging is the issue I'd just file it down a bit.
 

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I prefer the flat MS, because it fits my hand, and gives me a natural point of aim.

I like the arched- it raises the muzzle higher and makes it easier for me to find it on the initial presentation.
My Son on the other hand, prefers the arched MS, for the exact same reasons. His arched MS raised his POA just enough where it made his point natural.

I guess what I'm saying is that if ya like the 'looks', and can get a natural point with one or the other, then go for it. For me the deciding factor comes down to a natural POA, over 'looks'!

But, as they say; 'to each his own'!!
 

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All my 1911s have arched main spring housings for two reasons. First is that is the way they were first built and second, I have large hands and they fit better in my hand.
 
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I don't like the look of that "sharp edge" of the flat gripped 1911 most everyone else seems to love.

I feel the arched mainspring housing "looks more graceful" and would be less apt to snag clothing during carry.

Am I alone here?
To me this is a tempest in a teapot. You should be able to pick up a 1911 from a table and shoot it well, regardless of which housing it has.
A demo I have done a number of times is to put 6 or so cocked-and-locked 1911s on a table, and five or six pie plate targets at 7-to-10 meters. A light towel is lain over the guns, three with curved and three with flat housings.
It is a timed test. The shooter goes for the best time with two hits per target per gun. Without looking, the shooter reaches under the towel and grabs a gun and shoots the targets. S/he does this three time, which always means s/he will shoot at least one of each housing type. I have yet to see a difference.
We do not aim with the heel of our hand. We use primarily the sights. I have never paused in the middle of a string to say "OOPS! Wrong MainSpring Housing! Better adjust" Sights, on the other hand . . ..
I do agree the curved one looks nicer.
Air gun Art paint Trigger Paint Wood
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Point shooting is where the gun's grip matters. ANYone should be able to aim and shoot ANYthng fine, at least regards to the grip. I practice draw and point a lot at 10 yards or less and I do best with my revolvers. That's why I like carrying them. I'm not paranoid that there's only 5 rounds in the gun.
 
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