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Not in caliber (or gauge) but in whether your preference is side-by-side or over-under configurations.

My dad has a several double barreled scatter guns from differing manufacturers and in both configurations. Seems you see side-by-side depicted in most movies and probably because they are westerns and coach guns and side-by-side was probably more fashionable (read: available) then. Just didn't know if you scattergunners had a preference and, if so, why.
 

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Not in caliber (or gauge) but in whether your preference is side-by-side or over-under configurations.

My dad has a several double barreled scatter guns from differing manufacturers and in both configurations. Seems you see side-by-side depicted in most movies and probably because they are westerns and coach guns and side-by-side was probably more fashionable (read: available) then. Just didn't know if you scattergunners had a preference and, if so, why.
I'm partial to side by sides personally especially the ones with exposed hammers and double triggers like my Liberty (made in Turkey), now sold under CZ brand name.
 

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I've been a big side by side person since the first time I saw my Great Grandfathers shotgun that has now been passed down through my hands and will be to my son when the time is righ. Then on to his son, who is named after my Dad. It is an old Parker Brothers Side by Side 12 gauge beast.

Family Fire Arm History....gotta love it.
 

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I'd be curious to see if we actually still have any wing shooters who use a side by side. S X S's were still pretty popular even in the sixties when the first Browning Superposed Over/Unders started hitting my awareness radar. I never was much of a double barrel fan, only owning a Rossi coach gun I bought new in 78 for $69. It didn't make the skillet shot quail gun I had expected it to and I sold it.

For wingshooters, the O/U was an easier double to swing in terms of shot alignment and easier to learn than the S X S. I never shot either one enough to ever become comfortable with either and while I dabbled with semiautos in my early 20's, I became a pump shooter and never looked back. Still, I think it takes more talent to swing a S X S than an O/U
 

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I've never done any wing shooting with a Dbl barrel, but have shot plenty of clays. My personal choice leans towards O/U, both in handling
and looks. I'm in Jake's camp when it comes to bird hunting, my 870 Wingmaster is the only gun I'll ever need. If it flies, it dies. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm hearing about what I expected to hear. A lot of favor for the looks of the side-by-side yet favor for the accuracy of the over-under where accuracy is more at a premium.

I have an old Browning A5(my grandfather purchased it new in 1956) in 12G and certainly follow the argument for keeping the operation simple in terms of follow up shots. Other than where shot count is at the premium (firing as few shots as possible) I cannot think of why double barrels would ever be the choice of the discerning hunter.
 

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A SxS is a beautiful work of art and travel well in the grouse woods but most are hard to fit on us American shooters. The low comb leaves me staring at the breech lever instead of the rib. I've shouldered and shot reworked, custom Parker's that fit perfect and they point and shoot like they were extensions of my eyes. If you like the look and feel of a SxS, you can find one that fits you. O&U shotguns are sweet too but for instinctive wing shooting, I like an English grip and 2 triggers which IMHO, the SxS does a better job, especially in the appearance dept.
 

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No discussion of double barreled shotguns would be complete without at least one mention of the best ever made:

 
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I have a side-by-side double barrel that I inherited from my grandfather. It's a Lefever Nitro Special 12 gauge made in the early 1920s. I don't shoot it anymore because (A) it kicks like a mule (no recoil pad, just the plastic butt plate that came with it, and I'm not going to modify it) and (B) I don't want to score the inside of the barrels with the steel shot you have to purchase today. I do keep a box of #5 lead shot and some lead slugs nearby, just in case I ever need to use it for varmints and such. I really like side-by-side doubles, the appearance is appealing, especially from the view at the working end. The view from the business end is somewhat intimidating, but I try to avoid being at that end of the piece.
 

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First shot gun I ever fired was a side by side black powder shot gun. I have always liked the side by side look. Seems to me Elmer always liked one as well...

Cartoon Animated cartoon Illustration Drawing Child
 
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I'd be curious to see if we actually still have any wing shooters who use a side by side. S X S's were still pretty popular even in the sixties when the first Browning Superposed Over/Unders started hitting my awareness radar. I never was much of a double barrel fan, only owning a Rossi coach gun I bought new in 78 for $69. It didn't make the skillet shot quail gun I had expected it to and I sold it.

For wingshooters, the O/U was an easier double to swing in terms of shot alignment and easier to learn than the S X S. I never shot either one enough to ever become comfortable with either and while I dabbled with semiautos in my early 20's, I became a pump shooter and never looked back. Still, I think it takes more talent to swing a S X S than an O/U
I've never shot many birds either but have shot a lot of clays with the side by side I have. Oh and the barrel on mine is 24" not 20" like the couch guns which also makes it a tighter group depending on the load. As for the Rossi Couch gun I also have a 20 ga SxS Stoeger coach gun my wife likes to shoot. My first shotgun 45 years ago was a 20 ga like my 12 ga which I loved.
 

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I have a Savage SxS and love it.
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I've never been bird hunting, so I don't own an over/under. I bought one side-by-side coach gun to complement my Marlin 336, and hopefully I'll end up with a single action revolver soon to round out my cowboy collection.



 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've never been bird hunting, so I don't own an over/under. I bought one side-by-side coach gun to complement my Marlin 336, and hopefully I'll end up with a single action revolver soon to round out my cowboy collection.



Quite a pair ya got on yer there. Good luck rounding out the triumvirate!
 

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I'm a big shotgun fan. I like them all actually. There is a charm and elegance about a well made S x S that is hard to beat for aesthetics, though I find most of those old long barreled side by sides a bit cumbersome to shoot. I like the coach guns for a number of things, though not bird hunting. I like the tactical shotguns as well because they add another useful dimension to the dynamic of shotgun usage. But, my favorite is still the over and under. I shoot trap competitively. I run between 12 and 15 thousand rounds through the gun every year. My suggestion would be buy one of each!
 

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I have owned several of both over the years. I shot Skeet and Sporting Clays with an O/U for many years but still hunted with a S/S or Autoloader. I still have a couple of S/S guns and an Autoloader for Doves and Small Game. I said in an earlier post that I began hunting with a Stevens 311 that I had restocked. I guess I still prefer the S/S just for nostalgia.
 

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I'd be curious to see if we actually still have any wing shooters who use a side by side. S X S's were still pretty popular even in the sixties when the first Browning Superposed Over/Unders started hitting my awareness radar. I never was much of a double barrel fan, only owning a Rossi coach gun I bought new in 78 for $69. It didn't make the skillet shot quail gun I had expected it to and I sold it.

For wingshooters, the O/U was an easier double to swing in terms of shot alignment and easier to learn than the S X S. I never shot either one enough to ever become comfortable with either and while I dabbled with semiautos in my early 20's, I became a pump shooter and never looked back. Still, I think it takes more talent to swing a S X S than an O/U
The SxS is my favorite type of shotgun. I use two SXS, one 16ga & one in 20ga, for all of my upland hunting of dove, grouse, pheasant, quail, & rabbits. For upland work I prefer two shots with two chokes, over the three shots through one choke; as with a pump or semi auto. I do use a pump however when hunting ducks & geese in the salt water of Puget Sound. (My SxS doubles are too fine of guns to use in such a harsh environment.)
 

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I have an old stevens 530m tenite stock 30' 12 ga, SXS from the early 40's It's been the last thing many turkeys have heard. hehe sorry my cats keep trying to get in the picture.

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