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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK noobs ALLWAYS ALLWAYS ALLWAYS REMEMBER to check your cartridge. I missed one and had a missfire and no powder caused a round to be stuck in the pipe. I had to end my range time because of my stupidity. I weigh ALL rounds but I missed one and it caught up with me. I am very cautious so I ended my range time and came home. I removed the stuck round and all is good. Allways check and double check to be sure before you set that bullet that the case is charged.
 

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And while your at it make sure that you didn't double charge one either....
 
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I find it best to develop a system when using a single stage press. Here's a quick overview of what I do. Afters all the cases have been prepped, I load the charge in 10 cases, seat the bullet in those cases and set them in a tray. I'll repeat this until the tray is full. I then crimp all 50 rounds. It's time consuming but it assures me that I've done everything correctly.
 

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I hear ya, but it isn't always easy. I use a progressive press, and it's pretty dang hard to see down a .38 case with a light charge of Bullesye or 231. My problem is not me, but my powder measures. They would stick and fail to cycle. I'd go along fine for a couple of hundred rounds then run into a series of squibs, like 5 out of the next 20.

I'm trying to come up with a system to prevent that. Right now I don't trust my powder measures much. I think I've found the problem and corrected it, and have found a few more ideas on the web. If anybody else made an automatic powder measure with fixed rotors I'd buy it and dump the Lees. If you google "Lee Auto-Disk sticks" you'll find it's not an uncommon problem.

I could go to an automatic Dillon measure, or a manual measure. Right now my solution is to carry a plastic hammer and a hardwood dowel in my trunk. I get some funny looks at the range though if I have to use it. One guy asked me if my Smith & Wesson 66 was a muzzle loader. There's always a wise guy.
 

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I use a Hornady progressive and the powder drop would occasionally stick when I first started using. It hasn't done that recently but now I also use a powder cop die
 
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I use a Hornady progressive and the powder drop would occasionally stick when I first started using. It hasn't done that recently but now I also use a powder cop die
Unfortunately my Dillons are four station presses. Since I crimp separate from seating I don't have a station left. I could get a Hornady......hmmmm.....
 

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Yeah, squibs suck. Not just for the potential problem of blowing your firearm all to hell, but also undermining your confidence in your loads.

On a Dillon, I've got a light that shines down onto the left side of the shell plate. My loading routine makes sure I LOOK AT EVERY SHELL after I've dumped powder in, and before I place the bullet.

When I loaded on a turret, after I sized and primed the cases, I'd set them into a shellholder. When I had 50, I'd load the powder in all with a Lyman powder measure. I'd count each one as I loaded it, then visually check each case -- again, a routine.

Anyone who loads needs to find what works for them. But we all need to find something that does work.
 

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after my first squib, i use single stage, i check after i charge , and before i seat the bullet. I am still nervous about squibs don't like them at all. my son was shooting when I had a squib he said hey that one sounded a little funny, lucky the lead did not go to far into the barrel, jamming it up so the next round would not chamber for lack of room .I am a lot more cautious now. but still not liking it
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey folks thanks for the replies. Just to let you know I am doing this on my phone for a few days. My power supply for my laptop crashed Friday so I am doing this on my phone with one finger lol. I try to keep a routine I really do and I also try to weigh ALL LOADED ROUNDS. My wife the weekend before Thanksgiving broke her left ankle in 3 places so surgery etc she was off for 8 weeks. I told you that so you would understand my situation. I waited on her hand and foot no pun intended lol. The night I was reloading she was having a bad evening pain wise so she was calling me away from the bench alot . She is back at work actually started back the 14th yea... So I tumble, deprime, clean the primer well and I have plastic bins for this step. Deprimed go in there own bin. Ok everything is cleaned and deprimed now I inspect the casings. And put them in a seperat bin for priming. Primed goes into an empty bin. Ok I have a digital scale and a brass charging pan with pour spout. I do have the Lee trickle charger but dint really like it. Anyway I measure out each load by hand. If I am loading 21.2 grns thats what I weigh out. Then I place a boolit on the charged cas and set aside. I dont have a tray yet so I only prep 10 to 12 rounds at a time then seat those and continue charging until I have all charged and seated. This is the time after seating and before crimping is when I weigh each round. I know its a long proccess but I am disabled and retired I have nothing but time. It gets me back into reloading and I focus well usually I focus lol. Anyway I missed one and didnt charge it. The wife was with me and she wanted to shoot but saw what the H110 was doing to me and decided not to lol. When I had the missfire the primer pushed the 158 grn LRN just up into the barrel. I usually take my cleaning and tool kit but left it at home. I have an oak dowel and a small rawhide hammer in my kit. Anyway I told her what happened so we came home and shes like baby I am so sorry like it was her fault. Well kinda sorta I was distracted BUT thats when I should have stopped and not continued until I was finished helping her. It is my job when my wife is unable to take care of herself to do it for her. So all you noobs ALWAYS CHECK AND RECHECK. I cant strwss this enough. If you miss a charge like I did and you try to shoot another round it will blow up in your face. It can destroy your firearm and hurt or even kill you and the same could happen if you double charge. IF IT DONT GO BANG STOP UNLOAD AND CHECK YOUR FIREARM. Clear the obstruction and continue. As long as you check yourself when reloading you wont have any problems. Im not trying to scare anyone from learning how to reload just giving advice on how to be careful. I love it. Ok I have rambled ob enough got to go put some cases in the tumbler. I did make a short video with my old digital camera and if I can figure out how to post it I will post it today. I was shooting 125 grn SJHP 21.2 grn H110 and it was kicking the poop outta me lol. My old camera is old and the lens is slow so it dosrnt show all of the fireballs but I saw everyone and my wife setting in the car saw them too lol.
 
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For 9mm and .45ACP I charge a tray of 50 and then check the charge in each case with a flashlight. Then as I put the charged case in a single stage press I give it another look. So far, in the few months I have been reloading, I have not had any problem loads....(knock wood!).
 

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I have a Hornady 5 station press, I leave the station right after the powder measure empty so I can look in the case before setting the bullet on top.
 

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After seeing someone mention it here a few weeks ago, I mounted a flex head flashlight to my press to help see inside the
charged case. Works like a charm!
 
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Yeah I need to mount a light. Weighing the cases doesn't work for me if I am using mixed brass. The weight variation in cases causes a lot of confusion when you're only using something in the neighborhood of 3 grains of powder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A wooden dowel, and something to tap it with, are good things to have in the range bag, just in case.
Hey smoke I agree we shoot down in a creek bed not far frim the house and the wife was like Daddy can I shoot your gun? I was so happy she was finally taking intrest I forgot my range bag lol. Im going to have to change powder and soften up my loads if she is going to shoot it. Even my lighter loads 15 to 16.7 grns of H110 with my 158 grn LRN Ithink will kick her little tiny hands to hard.
 

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Hey smoke I agree we shoot down in a creek bed not far frim the house and the wife was like Daddy can I shoot your gun? I was so happy she was finally taking intrest I forgot my range bag lol. Im going to have to change powder and soften up my loads if she is going to shoot it. Even my lighter loads 15 to 16.7 grns of H110 with my 158 grn LRN Ithink will kick her little tiny hands to hard.
Get her hooked on .22 first. You wouldn't want to scare her away. I did that with a six year old, and all she talks about is shooting my 'evul assault rifle'. Not yet though, hands are still to small.


An assortment of things in the range bag are a good idea for taking care of those things that can stop a range session. I admit, I've used that wooden dowel a couple of times myself, but I've loaned it out many more times. :D
 

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Get her hooked on .22 first. You wouldn't want to scare her away. I did that with a six year old, and all she talks about is shooting my 'evul assault rifle'. Not yet though, hands are still to small.


An assortment of things in the range bag are a good idea for taking care of those things that can stop a range session. I admit, I've used that wooden dowel a couple of times myself, but I've loaned it out many more times. :D
I have never stuck one in the barrel yet, but I have had a couple I had to check to make sure.
 
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A wooden dowel, and something to tap it with, are good things to have in the range bag, just in case.
Yep - a squib is not a mistake that anyone wants to make but it is not the end of the world - I've done it once and DO NOT want to repeat that. It is not really dangerous IF you hear it and react properly - by not firing the next shot. THEN you are in gun disaster territory.

Mine happened while early into reloading and I was at the range testing ammo - had the chrono out and was writing between each shot. Squib, stop, unload - probe barrel. It can take considerable force to remove a bullet. You will learn just how tight the bullet/barrel tolerance is. The wood dowel is soft enough that you will not damage the barrel as you POUND out the bullet.

I now reload for competition. When shooting at match speeds I could be in a string of rapid fire that exceeds my hand - brain safety level - the finger could be moving on the next shot before the brain can put on the brakes. Even with ROs and SOs also watching and listening by the time they yell STOP and I hear, process and comprehend what is going on it COULD be too late. There is a big maybe in there but I do not want to be on the wrong side of maybe with a squib - EVER!!
 

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For 9mm and .45ACP I charge a tray of 50 and then check the charge in each case with a flashlight. Then as I put the charged case in a single stage press I give it another look. So far, in the few months I have been reloading, I have not had any problem loads....(knock wood!).
Yes Sir, i do the same thing!
I batch load and every case is checked a minimum of twice and most times three times before anything goes on top of the case.
I use a turret press though, it is used pretty mucha s a single station.
Not for the speed merchant but sure helps with safety.
 
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