Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a professional "trigger job" on my taurus. Took it to the range today and about a 3rd of the time the primer failed to ignite. I could let the cylinder continue around and the second hit would generally fire. I was using a mixture of cheap range ammo (Freedom and ???). Is there a brand of ammo that is known to have softer primers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Had a professional "trigger job" on my taurus. Took it to the range today and about a 3rd of the time the primer failed to ignite. I could let the cylinder continue around and the second hit would generally fire. I was using a mixture of cheap range ammo (Freedom and ???). Is there a brand of ammo that is known to have softer primers?
Sounds like the hammer spring is too light. Call the "professional" who did the work and tell them about it and find out what the weight of the spring was they installed. Then, if it's more convenient or necessary for you, go to the Wolffe Gunsprings website and get the heavier one you need, or a multi-pak of 3 different springs. They are not at all hard to install.;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,955 Posts
Use Federal Primers, My Cowboy Action Revolvers love them....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tinker Pearce

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
If you're shooting "Factory Reloads" you might want to rethink that. I've seen several reports of different problems. You should not be seeing a high seated primer issue, but that you can check by running your thumb over the primers to make sure that they're no higher than flush with the case-rim and should actually be slightly below the case-rim. If they're higher than that, you will get misfires with the first firing where the hammer/striker actually seats the primer to a lower position that allows them to fire with a second strike.

But, customizing usually involves lowering the weight of the Hammer/Mainspring. If it is too light, you'll get failures to fire on the first strike. Thus the reason for contacting the smith who did the work. At least find out the weight rating of the spring he used, and you can go a little heavier with a high quality spring from Wolffe Gunsprings. This issue is more common than one might think. Particularly with guys that tinker with the strain screw on their S&W DA revolvers where they relieve enough tension to make the first strike too light and then wonder why they are getting failures to fire.

On my own revolvers, I rarely use a lighter hammer/mainspring because a lighter trigger-return spring can often yield the desire result. I do not want to increase the hammer's lock-time and with GP100s I've actually gone a bit heavier with a Wolffe Hammer spring and used a lighter trigger return spring along with a little fine polishing.;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tinker Pearce

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,943 Posts
I agree with the others. Your 'professional' probably went too light on the hammer spring.

There's more to a 'trigger job' than just lightening springs. Just cleaning up the action of all of the rough spots and burrs left on the parts and the frame from the manufacturing process can lighten the trigger pull by reducing drag. I'm not talking about touching the essential engagement surfaces (sear to hammer, trigger to sear, ...) because those MUST have the proper geometry for reliable long term use and, if you don't know what you are doing, you can screw them up and cause more problems down the road. What I mean is cleaning up the other surfaces that come in contact with each other or the frame. This is all hand work (which translates into time and labor dollars, so the factory doesn't do it any more) and a lot of it with stones or files- to keep from taking off too much and causing another problem while trying to fix the current one. I had a gun once time that had a really rough hand channel in the frame. When I cleaned it up, the trigger pull dropped noticeably just from the removal of the drag on that one part.

There's a difference in the sensitivity of primers from different companies. I don't know about the imported ones but traditionally, Federals are the most sensitive American primer, CCI (Speer) is the hardest with Winchester and Remington falling in between the two.

That's why I tend to use Speer ammo for break in of new concealed carry guns. If it can digest several hundred rounds of Lawman without primer strike issues, then it will go bang when I need it to. It may cost more to do break in with it than using some bargain brand of range ammo but, if I need it to work, it will need to work right NOW and my peace of mind is worth the extra cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I had the same problem with my 905. The previous owner had installed a Wolfe spring kit that was too light. I actually resolved this by placing a spacer around the mainspring guide, but that's really not the best solution. I agree that you should consult the gunsmith and proceed from there as others have suggested.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top