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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's extremely difficult to eject the spent cartridges. The .22 LR cylinder works fine, the ejector just pushes out the brass. With the mag cylinder I have to tap (more like HIT with an object) the ejector to get the brass started to move. Seems like the brass has swelled up to the point that they are so tight that they just won't move.

This last shooting session was with Remington Magnum Rimfire 40 GR PSP. Casing O.D measures .240" before firing, 242" to .244" after firing. I've tried cleaning the chambers and putting the spent casings back in, some chambers seem to resist more than others. Not easy to re-insert the casings.

Wondering if anyone else has experienced this problem, and if there's a fix.
 

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check the forcing cone, make sure it is clean. Inspect for shaving.

It sounds like excessive pressure, timing and a dirty forcing cone are the only two things I can think of that would cause the problem.
Well, not quite. If neither of those two things is the problem, slug the barrel and see if it's too tight.

I guess one other thing to try, maybe even first, is try different ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
check the forcing cone, make sure it is clean. Inspect for shaving.

It sounds like excessive pressure, timing and a dirty forcing cone are the only two things I can think of that would cause the problem.
Well, not quite. If neither of those two things is the problem, slug the barrel and see if it's too tight.

I guess one other thing to try, maybe even first, is try different ammo.
Thanks. I'll take a close look at the forcing cone, but it seems that a problem there would also have an effect on the .22 LR cartridges. I do have a couple other brands of WMR ammo, did not have but the one with me this time at the range.
 

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Mine does the same thing. I think it is the nature of the beast.
 

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Your cylinder has over size and/ or rough chambers. Call Taurus and send it back. Proper sized and chambered cylinders are not hard to eject fired factory ammo from regardless of rimfire or centerfire, or caliber. A chamber that is cut right the fired brass will usually fall out of. A gunsmith friend chambered a cylinder for me this past week. The cases fall out of it when the cylinder is opened and gun pointed up.even with hot loads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Your cylinder has over size and/ or rough chambers. Call Taurus and send it back. Proper sized and chambered cylinders are not hard to eject fired factory ammo from regardless of rimfire or centerfire, or caliber. A chamber that is cut right the fired brass will usually fall out of. A gunsmith friend chambered a cylinder for me this past week. The cases fall out of it when the cylinder is opened and gun pointed up.even with hot loads.
At .240" the unfired cartridges fall in easily. I can't accurately measure the diamater of the chambers, but it's obvious they are larger than .240.
It just seems that the expanded, fired casings (.242 t0 .244) are creating too much friction, maybe a couple of them more than others. Also, because these cartridges are quite long, there is a lot of surface to surface contact contributing to the friction. Once they start to move they are not a problem.

I definitely need to check it out with some different ammo. This problem can be dealt with at the range, but it sure doesn't allow a quick & easy reload.

One other comment--- the ejector for the Magnum cylinder does not fully push the spent cartridges out of the chambers. Seems like an engineering/design flaw to me.
 

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My M94 had the same problem when new. What I figured was happening was the rear edge the chambers were a sharp. The bullet casing rim will have a slight radius where it sets into the chamber causing a slight bind. Just enough with 9 rounds chambered to give ejection problems. What I did was use some 1000 grit and took that sharp edge off of the rear of the chambers. Didn't take much. Cleaned the cyl real good after that. Haven't had any trouble since.
 
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Sir, most revolver rounds are straight wall cases. There are a few bottleneck but I say this dealing with straight wall cases. The 22 mag is a straight wall case. When fired the case expands and seals the chamber by pressing against the chamber walls. When pressure drops the case shrinks some and with a proper cut chamber is easy to extract. All chambers are not cut with slick parallel walls. A slight bulge or rough walls can make extraction almost impossible sometimes. I'm getting out of shooting and getting rid of most of my collection. One revolver had a bad chamber in the cylinder that made extraction hard. We rechambered the cylinder to a slightly larger case of the same caliber. The gun and cylinder can handle the round. It solved the extraction problem. Some require a polish some a new cylinder. It depends on how serious the problem is. Bottom line Taurus will fix it.
 

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What you are describing is not normal and if it were me, I'd send it in. My 992 has many, many rounds of both LR and recently WMR and I have not had this type of problem with my revolver. I wish you the best of luck because it is a sweet wheelgun.
 

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I have this problem also but not with all types of ammo. The fmj winchesters stick bad but hornady and federals are fine. I did treat the gun including the mag cylinder with frog lube and it helped out tremendously.
 

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If you look at the rim with a jewelers lope you will see the small radius that is between the rim and the "straight sided" casing. It is there from manufacture stamping. It is just enough for a bind to occur until the sharp rim of the chamber is worn down or is "smithed" into not binding. I have experienced this same problem with my M94 and have fixed it by my own method. I am an accomplished machinest and don't call me "sir".
 
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One other comment--- the ejector for the Magnum cylinder does not fully push the spent cartridges out of the chambers. Seems like an engineering/design flaw to me.
Many revolvers have short extractor travel as compared to cartridge length. Snub nose revolvers are probably most known for this. Considering your revolver is a switch cartridge gun, the extractor was made the same between each cylinder to facilitate extractor rod length under the barrel. It would make more sense to make both extractors longer, but I guess they didn't.

Anyway, all you have to do is give the extractor rod a quick strike to let momentum carry the cartridges clear. That is after you cylinder chamber problem is remedied.

At .240" the unfired cartridges fall in easily. I can't accurately measure the diamater of the chambers, but it's obvious they are larger than .240.
It just seems that the expanded, fired casings (.242 t0 .244) are creating too much friction, maybe a couple of them more than others. Also, because these cartridges are quite long, there is a lot of surface to surface contact contributing to the friction. Once they start to move they are not a problem.
I had this same problem in a Ruger Single Six convertible I got a year or so ago. It was brand new and it had real problems extracting empties out of the Magnum cylinder. To make things worse it was almost impossible to get fresh cartridges to seat fully once a few cylinders of ammo was fired. This was only with .22 Magnum ammo, the .22 LR cylinder worked great with all .22 LR ammo.

What I did to fix up my Magnum cylinder was to polish the chambers. I read up about it at several firearms forums before attempting it. In my case I removed the cylinder from the gun for easy access and looked what I had around me to use for polishing. I ended up using a short slotted tip pistol cleaning rod and wrapped a cleaning patch around the tip and sides to completely cover the part of the rod that would be in the chamber.

I chucked that set up into my handy-dandy variable speed drill driver, and coated the cleaning patch in some Mother's liquid wheel polish. Other people may use Flitz. Then I inserted the gooey patch into one chamber at a time while spinning it with the drill driver.

You will want the patch to fit snugly in the chamber, so you may have to adjust your patch size by cutting or even double it. Proceed with caution so you get a feel of the torque and don't have the cylinder ripped out of your hand.

Anyway, move the patch in and out to hit the entire length of the chamber. The cylinder will get warm and the cloth may turn crusty brown. Do this to the remainder of the chambers with a new cleaning patch for each one.

Once done, clean out the chambers with your usual brass brush, new cleaning patches, and gun cleaner. Wipe dry and see how much the factory tooling marks in the chamber have been minimized.

When I did this, I didn't get extraction fouling problems for at least two boxes of ammo compared to only a couple cylinders full as before. Plus, loading new cartridges into pre-fired and fouled chambers was a drop in affair.

As far as accuracy, I didn't see it worsen or get better after this procedure. For example, this old photo was from after polishing the chambers.

View attachment 58479
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Many revolvers have short extractor travel as compared to cartridge length. Snub nose revolvers are probably most known for this. Considering your revolver is a switch cartridge gun, the extractor was made the same between each cylinder to facilitate extractor rod length under the barrel. It would make more sense to make both extractors longer, but I guess they didn't.

Anyway, all you have to do is give the extractor rod a quick strike to let momentum carry the cartridges clear. That is after you cylinder chamber problem is remedied.



I had this same problem in a Ruger Single Six convertible I got a year or so ago. It was brand new and it had real problems extracting empties out of the Magnum cylinder. To make things worse it was almost impossible to get fresh cartridges to seat fully once a few cylinders of ammo was fired. This was only with .22 Magnum ammo, the .22 LR cylinder worked great with all .22 LR ammo.

What I did to fix up my Magnum cylinder was to polish the chambers. I read up about it at several firearms forums before attempting it. In my case I removed the cylinder from the gun for easy access and looked what I had around me to use for polishing. I ended up using a short slotted tip pistol cleaning rod and wrapped a cleaning patch around the tip and sides to completely cover the part of the rod that would be in the chamber.

I chucked that set up into my handy-dandy variable speed drill driver, and coated the cleaning patch in some Mother's liquid wheel polish. Other people may use Flitz. Then I inserted the gooey patch into one chamber at a time while spinning it with the drill driver.

You will want the patch to fit snugly in the chamber, so you may have to adjust your patch size by cutting or even double it. Proceed with caution so you get a feel of the torque and don't have the cylinder ripped out of your hand.

Anyway, move the patch in and out to hit the entire length of the chamber. The chamber will get warm and the cloth may turn crusty brown. Do this to the remainder of the chambers with a new cleaning patch for each one.

Once done, clean out the chambers with your usual brass brush, new cleaning patches, and gun cleaner. Wipe dry and see how much the factory tooling marks in the chamber have been minimized.

When I did this, I didn't get extraction fouling problems for at least two boxes of ammo compared to only a couple cylinders full as before. Plus, loading new cartridges into pre-fired and fouled chambers was a drop in affair.

As far as accuracy, I didn't see it worsen or get better after this procedure. For example, this old photo was from after polishing the chambers.

View attachment 58479
Kinda like honing engine cylinders, huh? I have some jewelers rouge, I think I'll give it a try. I'm also going to make sure there are no burrs or sharp edges at the entry into the chambers. Thanks.
 

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Kinda like honing engine cylinders, huh? I have some jewelers rouge, I think I'll give it a try. I'm also going to make sure there are no burrs or sharp edges at the entry into the chambers. Thanks.
Jewelers rouge is a very fine polish, right?

While I spent some time doing the polishing, when I was done the bluing in the chambers was still dark and not polished to bare metal.
 

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I have not had that problem with mine. When I clean either of the cylinders, I pull the bore snake through the cylinder also, 2 times per hole. I finish the job off with a shot of Srike Hold. .22LR & .22 Mag are nasty rounds, requires frequent cleaning.
 

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My own experience with the WMR is that they are much cleaner and the cylinder doesn't really get dirty. I used Mothers on a bore mop chucked into a drill driver a while back and that may have helped. The SS long rifle cylinder face turns pitch black after just 30-40 rounds and is a bear to scrub off and I don't even try that hard anymore. I hope to see some range reports soon!
 

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I can't even find .22 WMR. :'(
 

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I can't even find .22 WMR. :'(
I hear ya. Got lucky and found a pile of Win. Super X at an estate sale in April, then the guy that sold me my like new MKll gave me 2 canvas bags full of mixed brands of LR and WMR. I felt like I won the lottery!
 

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I hear ya. Got lucky and found a pile of Win. Super X at an estate sale in April, then the guy that sold me my like new MKll gave me 2 canvas bags full of mixed brands of LR and WMR. I felt like I won the lottery!
Well, ol' buddy, ol' pal...
 
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