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A friend is getting into reloading. He has a 9mm die set. Can it be used to reload my 380?
You know thats an interesting question and i can't say for positive so we may need to wait for some 100% certian answers but!
i would sy off the top of my head that no it can't.
the 380 and 9MM while the same diameter projectile the case is different in that the 9 MM is a slightly tapered case (from rear to front) and the 380 case is straight.
there is a slight difference in the brass case size near the rear portion and i doubt that the case would be correctly resized to operate in you weapon.
again thats my take on it, never tried it personally.
lets see what others have to say.
Need to increase my knowledge of reloading anyway so I'll read along as well.
By the way what brand of die is it?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am sure someone will know for sure. It is a Lee 4 die set. I think you are correct, but who knows. I know nothing about reloading. I have been doing a lot of reading about it. And will continue to read more.
 

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Nope. The 9mm is a more tapered case and longer. The .380 is straighter-walled and ever so slightly smaller in diameter. The 9mm sizing die will be too big. I load for both, with separate dies.
 

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You could probably use the Factory Crimp die from the 9mm set on .380, I think it will adjust far enough. The FCD is my favorite LEE product (maybe my favorite reloading tool form any manufacturer)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have looked and can't find any 4 piece die sets. I guess I will have to buy a 3 piece and the fcd separate.
 

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Nope. The 9mm is a more tapered case and longer. The .380 is straighter-walled and ever so slightly smaller in diameter. The 9mm sizing die will be too big. I load for both, with separate dies.
I agree.

While decapping and resizing a few hundred 380 i found a couple of 9mm Luger cases after they were run through the 380 die. They were necked down considerably and was a clear indication that there was a difference in the cases. To that end I would have to say that trying to use 9mm dies to load 380 would be the waste of a good afternoon.

HOWEVER, I have been loading 100gr 380 bullets on a 9mm case, that works really well. Plus using the Lee FC makes a really nice cartridge.

Fatboy Packin'
 

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Two completely different set of dimensions. Requires two different die sets
 

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Bullet diameter is the same, although .380 takes lighter bullets.

Case specs, as shown by Glenwolde, are different. When the stray .380 works into a batch of 9mm I'm loading, or vice versa, I can tell IMMEDIATELY when I throw the handle on the Dillon.

I've never tried the 9mm FCD on .380, but am skeptical about it working.
 

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The Lee 9mm Factory Crimp die cannot be adjusted far enough to crimp a .380 round, I've tried it.
They don't really need to be crimped though, that is just an extra insurance step to final size a loaded round to minimum diameter.
 

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I have looked and can't find any 4 piece die sets. I guess I will have to buy a 3 piece and the fcd separate.
Seems to me I had to go this route as well, I could not find the Lee 4 Die Set in .380.
 

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I can't remember how i ended up with a 4 die set in the 380?
But I have a Lee FCD for very semi auto caliber that I load and i think they are great for problem free range trips.
I can't remember a single round that failed the "Plunk" test once i adjusted the die correctly and started using them.
I think the FCD is about 15-16 bucks?
 

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Well I thought I bought a Lee .380 4-die set but when I checked my receipts I see I bought the FCD separately. I don't normally use my FCD much, I use a Hornady taper crimp die most of the time in .380. But I quit using the Lee seating die and my problems went away. Sometimes I wonder if the Lee FCD was invented to correct deficiencies in the Lee seating dies. Really not sure about that though.

I don't mean to be bad-mouthing Lee, just my experience. I use them, but I always seem to end up replacing their seating dies. I really like Redding's stuff, but it is a lot more expensive.
 

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Well I thought I bought a Lee .380 4-die set but when I checked my receipts I see I bought the FCD separately. I don't normally use my FCD much, I use a Hornady taper crimp die most of the time in .380. But I quit using the Lee seating die and my problems went away. Sometimes I wonder if the Lee FCD was invented to correct deficiencies in the Lee seating dies. Really not sure about that though.

I don't mean to be bad-mouthing Lee, just my experience. I use them, but I always seem to end up replacing their seating dies. I really like Redding's stuff, but it is a lot more expensive.
Do you mind explaining the problem with Lee's seating/crimping dies?
 

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I'd like to know too.

Fatboy Packin'
I keep getting excessive runout, or to be more technical, da bullets is catywampus, not sitting straight in the case. This tends to be much worse with the shorter, lighter weight bullets. It was especially bad with the .380. You could see they were crooked. I had the proper seating punch. Switched to a Redding .380 die and it worked perfectly.

I know a lot of people use Lee dies with perfect satisfaction. I've had a little (not a lot) trouble with them, but all related to seating dies and excessive runout. I only load lead bullets, and I only load handgun rounds. I seat and crimp in separate steps.
 

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I have actually used 9mm dies to reload some 380 auto rounds for a WWII era Walther PPK. The 9mm die does not resize the 380 case all the way back down to factory 380 spec's. but it resized it enough to freely chamber in the wartime PPK chamber and they shot just fine. Just had to extend the bullet seating stem enough to seat bullet in shorter case. All this was done on a single stage press and I didn't load but 100 at a time. For volume loading on a progressive press go ahead and get the correct die set. I was just loading a few, on a limited basis, to see if it would work...and it did. Just load a few dummy rounds and see if they will cycle thru your gun. If so load some with primer and powder and give it a go.
 
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