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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone point me to a how-to on this? Did the .25cent trigger job on my glock and liked the results. Would love to do this to the 709 as well. My S/A pull actually feels heavier than my D/A pull. Haven't tested officially, just feels like it. I assumed it was just like the glock but man the 2 pins that I think you take out to remove the trgger assembly are really in there tight! The glock you can completely disassemble with a ball point pen. But the pins on the 709, on mine anyway, can't be taken out by hand. The placement of everything looks just like the glock, the field strip, pin location, etc.. Didn't want to get to forceful with it and use a mallet until I get conformation from someone more expierenced. Does it take down like the glock?
 

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The 709 is quite different from a Glock. The restrike (aka double action) trigger is part of the trigger bar, just like Glock, but the 709 striker is not preloaded (partially cocked) like Glock. Glock has nothing that resembles the 709 single action trigger/sear. My advice is to smooth out your SA trigger by dry-firing the gun after a good cleaning and lube of the sear area. The actual surfaces where the sear rides in the MIM aft bracket are not really accessible for polishing anyway. Furthermore, you are likely to lose parts if you disassemble this mechanism and Taurus will not sell you replacement parts (all restricted). If you do decide to disassemble this area, do it inside a big plastic bag or in a bare, closed room where nothing can get lost. Reinstalling the sear spring requires either a special tool, a third hand, or a DIY trick (I used a loop of dental floss).

Seriously, you can clean this area very well with GunScrubber. I use compressed air to blow out residual Gunscrubber and dry things out. You MUST relubricate after using Gunscrubber. I use spray lube here, again followed by compressed air. The only reason to disassemble the sear assembly , IMO, is if you have a bad part or need to adjust the sear spring. Since you can't get replacement parts, you can't fix a bad part. If the sear sometimes fails to catch the striker or the SA trigger force is very erratic, the sear spring force could be too weak; so the only reason to disassemble the sear assembly would be to adjust the sear spring force, IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ah, ok. Thank you sir. Was kinda thinking once took apart it'd be a different critter inside because of the double action feature. I'll just leave it alone, lol. Goes to show that it never hurts to ask, just saved me a potential headache. Thanks again bud.
 

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I wouldn't do anything that might void your warranty the single action is heavier then the double well on mines anyways and my 740.
 

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I found smoothing the striker barrel out helped with trigger feel. Made it less "gritty". It's not gonna ever turn into a high dollar 1911 trigger, but it's not bad now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll give it a try. Had it apart before to get the cosmoline [sp?] out. Didn't do any polishing though. Being a CC I honestly don't mind a heavy pull thinking about it now, from a safety stand point. I still shoot this little thing better than anything else, so that's not effected. I honestly thought this weapon was a lemon at first, just felt cheap compared to glock or beretta, especially when I had to do the sights and all that. After break in and fixing the sights, have 600 rounds no problems, one holing the paper at 7 yards all day long, I'm not carrying anything else for awhile, this is a nice little firearm.
 

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I found smoothing the striker barrel out helped with trigger feel. Made it less "gritty". It's not gonna ever turn into a high dollar 1911 trigger, but it's not bad now.
I'm curious what you mean by "striker barrel"? I have that same gritty feel and even a catch in the trigger pull. I sent it to Taurus and it came back the same. I did take it completely apart and tried smoothing some things out. I used a little sand paper on the trigger bar, as I thought that was what caused the issue. Unfortunately, I apparently didn't take enough off or the problem is somewhere else. I was hesitant to grind away on the trigger bar much. I don't particularly want to take it apart again but I will if someone has another idea I could try.
 

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I can't think of anything on the trigger bar that would be helped by sandpaper. The firing pin (aka striker) slides in an orange plastic sleeve. Cleaning may help here but I doubt polishing the firing pin would make any difference in SA or DA smoothness. The "catch" you report could be the trigger safety that can "catch" if your finger is not flat against the face of the trigger. Most of the gritty feel in SA is the sear sliding aft within its bracket. You can't do much about that but it will smooth out with use and periodic cleaning and lubrication. If you mean a gritty feel during the takeup phase, polishing (not sanding) the top of the trigger bar where it pushed the firing-pin block may help (I never found this to be a problem).
 

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I can't think of anything on the trigger bar that would be helped by sandpaper. The firing pin (aka striker) slides in an orange plastic sleeve. Cleaning may help here but I doubt polishing the firing pin would make any difference in SA or DA smoothness. The "catch" you report could be the trigger safety that can "catch" if your finger is not flat against the face of the trigger. Most of the gritty feel in SA is the sear sliding aft within its bracket. You can't do much about that but it will smooth out with use and periodic cleaning and lubrication. If you mean a gritty feel during the takeup phase, polishing (not sanding) the top of the trigger bar where it pushed the firing-pin block may help (I never found this to be a problem).
I got you. I thought you might have meant the firing pin. I've had that apart and cleaned it. It fits really tight but I think it's fine. I never thought of the trigger safety, but I see what you mean. I can make that catch but that's not the issue. I don't believe it's the trigger sear either. It seems to look pretty good and seems to make it's movement pretty smoothly. The trigger bar slides back when you pull the trigger and there is something called the disconector (that's how it's spelled) that the trigger bar slides under. I tried smoothing the top of the trigger bar where it rubbed on that. It may have helped some of the gritty feel but there is still a catch. I can squeeze the trigger in SA after the takeup. It will start to break and then catch just past halfway of the SA pull. If I don't squeeze the trigger but make it more of a quick pull, I don't feel the catch but it's still there. I'm more or less jerking the trigger and I haven't been accurate with it. I've changed my hand position some and that helps but the catch is still there. I really think there's a very small "hump" on the trigger bar that needs some more smoothing. I've always squeezed my trigger but all my other guns have a smooth pull and quite a bit lighter pull. I think if I could get it lighter, the catch would not be such an issue. I think you recommended gunscrubber, which I've never used. I ordered some online and it should be here next week. I'll use that and see if it helps. I think I'll pull the firing pin again to have another look at it. I've never owned a gun with a sear before. I'm not familiar with how they work. I can see where the trigger bar pulls back the firing pin but I haven't quite figured out how it releases it to fire. I'm probably making it too hard. LOL When you say "polish", do you mean using some sort of polishing wheel to smooth it out or are you talking something like a car polish? Thanks for the reply and ideas. I'll take another look at the firing pin and I think you've helped me eliminate a few things.
 

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You must have the newer 4-pin version. The old ones just had a hump on the trigger bar. The new version has the separate disconnector. In either case. the hump or disconnector rides on the slide and pushes the trigger bar down except then the slide is "in battery" (full forward). With the trigger bar down it is pushed below the sear, effectively disconnecting the trigger from the sear. But the disconnector should have very little effect on the SA trigger force unless there is a serious burr on the trigger bar right at the contact spot.

Take the slide off and watch the interaction between the rearmost part of the trigger bar and the sear. The sear is the little piece that catches the firing pin foot when the slide cycles aft and holds it in the cocked position. The sear can slide fore and aft a little and also pivot down. The sear has little "ears" on both sides that ride in a track in the bracket that holds the sear. In the full up an forward position, notches in this track keep the sear full up where it holds the firing pin in the cocked position. The sear spring tries to hold the sear up but the sear can drop down, releasing the firing pin, if it's moves just a little aft and out of the notches. The firing pin spring creates most of the force that causes friction between the sear "ears" and the bracket. And I think it is this friction that causes your catch and gritty feel.

Unless you have something really wonky, the grit and catch are most likely the friction between the sear ears and the bracket. If you look at the parts diagram, the sear is part 5.07. the sear bracket is part 5.01, and the disconnector is 5.09. I still think your best bet will be hundreds of SA dry-fire cycles (with a snap cap if you prefer) with periodic cleaning and lubrication of the sear area.
 

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After my reply last night, I took it apart again, pulled the firing pin, and then went further and pulled the firing pin mechanism apart. The reason I pulled the pin apart is when I had the mechanism out and pushed the pin back by hand, I could feel a slight catch. It appeared to be catching on a coil of the small spring. It's like the 2nd coil of the spring was being pulled over the first coil and then snapping back. I've never seen anything like it before. I pulled it apart and everything looked fine, put it back together, and noticed the spring coil wasn't catching anymore. Now the pull feels smoother and I don't notice the catch anymore. I suspect that spring coil was catching just before the trigger broke. It's done that since it was new and even came back from Miami like that. I think it's probably one of those really "wonky" things you mentioned. I've probably dry fired it a couple thousand times and that hadn't made a difference. I seem to have eliminated the catch. Now I need to figure out how to lighten the trigger pull. It's breaking between 10 and 12 pounds now.
 
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