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Discussion Starter #1
I have a really mint 669 revolver...just picked it up and have not fired it as yet....When I got it the cylinder didn't seem to spin freely enough when tilted out of the frame...I suspected a bit of dirt or build up even though the gun appears almost unfired...I cleaned carefully and lubed the shaft and things seemed to be fine...cylinder spun fine....put it in my safe for a couple of weeks and just now when I pulled it out to wipe it down I noticed the cylinder again seemed to be a bit tight...as I rotated it by hand a few times it seemed to loosen up a bit...a drop of oil and it spins fine....it seems to work fine when dry firing it with snap caps in place....question is this....could this just be a situation caused by the gun not being broken in yet or should I be concerned enough to send it off to Taurus? This is the "nightstand" gun (or will be) and I sure don't want issues with it....
Thanks
 

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I would recommend that you go shoot it. You won't know anything about how it performs otherwise. I also wouldn't use a gun I hadn't fired as my nightstand gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies...I'd never use a gun for a nightstand gun until I'd shot it many times over...and both with and without ear protection and in bright as well as dim lighting...lots of folks go to the range with ear protection on and with it well lit....nothing at all like midnight...darkened house...no ear plugs so the shock of the explosion is not considered...and being dark, the muzzle flash can disconcert the shooter to not be able to get back on target...now back to the gun in question...I talked with a local gunsmith that is really up on the Taurus revolvers and he indicated that my gun probably had not been fired hardly at all and that the rod holding the cylinder is often a bit "draggy"...he said as long as it cycles and lockes up properly and the timing is fine there is no problem....he said he frequently sees dirty revolvers that have not been properly cleaned and lubricated where the cylinder is very difficult to get any spin and they still shoot when the mechanical advantage of the gun's mechanism comes into play....I'm used to my GP100 (current bed gun) and a 686S/W that I shoot frequently and they show a tendency to spin the cylinder far more easily than this 669...I also have a 66 Taurus that has a cylinder that is easier to spin but not like the GP or the 686...my question was just to see if the 669 has had noticible issues with anything like this in the past. It's going to get the heck shot out of it very soon...and then we'll get the picture...thanks again to all who answered.
 

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Good luck with it. I don't think I'd go shooting without hearing protection. You can't train yourself against the boom, but you can sure cause permanent damage. I expect that if you ever had to shoot in your house, in low light, that you will be more concerned about surviving that how well that 'training' prepared you. My .02.
 

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I would suggest field stripping the revolver and that includes removing the cylinder from ejector rod. Use this for stripping the revolver down to it's components.
http://www.taurusarmed.net/forums/smithing/22219-taurus-revolver-disassembly-pictorial-guide.html

Clean all those areas with something like Gun Scrubber. Then clean the cylinder hole in the center of the cylinder and the ejector rod with Gun Scrubber, solvent soaked patches, and then dry patches. Here's the reasoning. All kinds of dirt,grime,and debris can get in there and bind things up over time.

Clean the ejector star and the cylinder faces(both front and back) and each of the 6 cylinder cartridge charge holes.

Put it back together and you should be alright.

If there is a timing or locking up issue then the gun may need to go back for a fix.

Somebody may have dropped the gun the ejector rod may have been bent.

Before cleaning unlock the cylinder, pull the cylinder out and spin the cylinder on it's ejector rod. If there is a lot of percetpible wobble then the ejector rod may need replacing.

I just got two 669s from an online dealer and will be doing what you are being asked to do.

I owned a stainelss steel 669 many years ago. It has or had the smoothest,crisp, break like a glass rod trigger on it.

I can't say that is true for all of them, but it was the case for this paraticualr model. I unfortunately got rid of it. But I did buy another Taurus. It's a Taurus 66. It has the same kind of trigger the older 669 had.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good luck with it. I don't think I'd go shooting without hearing protection. You can't train yourself against the boom, but you can sure cause permanent damage. I expect that if you ever had to shoot in your house, in low light, that you will be more concerned about surviving that how well that 'training' prepared you. My .02.
I've been a pilot for years without mishap...when I was in training putting an airplane into spins and other very unusual attitudes was a basic part of my training....I do not like unusual attitutudes or spins...but then as well as now...about twice a year..I force myself to go through the drill...reason? I sure as heck don't want to get into a spin and never have recovered before...the book can tell me all I "need to know" but until I've actually experienced it I have no clue as to what I'm facing.

I don't shoot without ear protection except on very rare occasions to remind myself what that big boom is like and the disorientation that can come from a 38+p or a 357 going off in an enclosed space...no it isn't pleasant and sure wouldn't be something I'd do on a regular basis but like the spins...once in a great while it's something I do...as to the muzzel flash...if you have never experienced the muzzel flash of a full house 357 in a dim environment it can be a huge surprise and getting the gun back on target is a real problem...the old saying practice makes perfect can go one step further..."perfect practice makes perfect"...I think there are a lot of folks out there that buy a gun...maybe shoot it a few times or maybe even not...don't even bother to clean it up when new or after firing a few rounds....stick some ammo in it and put it in the drawer....Makes no sense to me at all...sort of like buying a car and never driving it until you have to evacuate the city for some reason and then trying to deal with something you have no idea about.....We live just a few miles from Tijuana and all the issues a border town can have...I have a self defense gun in the bedroom as well as several other locations for a reason and I want to know exactly what those are going to do under stressful conditions. As recently as last weekend there was a home invasion robbery just blocks from my house...2 punks beat up the family and stole their Unloaded hand guns along with other things....unloaded hand gun = throw a rock....We all have ways we get comfortable with things....like I said, I hate spinning an airplane but I better know what it's like and how to correct it for when the real deal comes along
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I would suggest field stripping the revolver and that includes removing the cylinder from ejector rod. Use this for stripping the revolver down to it's components.
http://www.taurusarmed.net/forums/smithing/22219-taurus-revolver-disassembly-pictorial-guide.html

Clean all those areas with something like Gun Scrubber. Then clean the cylinder hole in the center of the cylinder and the ejector rod with Gun Scrubber, solvent soaked patches, and then dry patches. Here's the reasoning. All kinds of dirt,grime,and debris can get in there and bind things up over time.

Clean the ejector star and the cylinder faces(both front and back) and each of the 6 cylinder cartridge charge holes.

Put it back together and you should be alright.

If there is a timing or locking up issue then the gun may need to go back for a fix.

Somebody may have dropped the gun the ejector rod may have been bent.

Before cleaning unlock the cylinder, pull the cylinder out and spin the cylinder on it's ejector rod. If there is a lot of percetpible wobble then the ejector rod may need replacing.

I just got two 669s from an online dealer and will be doing what you are being asked to do.

I owned a stainelss steel 669 many years ago. It has or had the smoothest,crisp, break like a glass rod trigger on it.

I can't say that is true for all of them, but it was the case for this paraticualr model. I unfortunately got rid of it. But I did buy another Taurus. It's a Taurus 66. It has the same kind of trigger the older 669 had.
Disassembled it again and paid special attention to the ejector rod area....when all apart I "rolled " the rod on a flat piece of glass and noticed a very slight...but very real "wobble" as it rolled...I've got a neighbor that is a retired aerospace machinist and I showed him the situation..he very slightly "tweaked" the rod....we lubed it lightly and put it all back together and bingo...problem (if it really was a true problem) solved...I don't think there was any danger to fire issue with the gun...really never did but I don't like to mess with something that is visibly different than other things that I know are right (my 66 cylinder was a "good spinner" as are my Smith 686 and my Ruger GP's)....now all is peaceful and I can go back to my nap....thanks again to everyone that commented....
 

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As always, I like happy endings. Now go shoot that thing!
 
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