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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a question that I am having a hard time figuring out. I purchased some 300 grain federal cast core .44 mag ammo for protection from mean critters while hiking etc. I looked at the factory ballistics on the box and it was around 1016 fps and 896 ft/lbs at the muzzle. I recently went to the range and got some Remington UMC 180 grain JSPs and those are rated over 1000 ft/lbs at the muzzle. How is it that there is less energy with a projectile backed by almost twice the powder? Is it simply that the hard cast lead is heavier? Lastly, is that the metric I should be looking at when determining the type of ammo to take into the woods? I know I don't want hollow points but rather penetration power, but it seems if energy is what's important the Remingtons would be the better choice (and at a fraction of the cost!) Thanks!
 

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Hollow points are fine there is a big difference in self defence hollow points and hunting hollow points. It's all about controlled expansion rates. Then again look at some Buffalo bore ammo and grizzly extreme àmmo in .44 mag
 

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OK, you lost me here!
what makes you think that one bullet has twice the amount of powder as the other??
Did you pull the projectiels and weigh the powder?
forget about how much powder is involved, its pressure that pushes the projectile and the weapon is designed to accept a certain level of pressure before it comes apart!
In the case of the 44 mag its 36,000 PSI if memory serves.
several things change pressure, such as projectile material, length of projectile and how deep its set into the case (reduces case capacity) type of powder, amount of powder.
Energy is pretty much figured by speed more than by projectiile weight, projectile weight has more to do with penetration.
so the heavier non expanding lead projectile naturally should have less energy than a 180 grain projectile because it is considerabally deeper seated into the case and so powder must be reduced to prevent an over pressure problem..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh ok, it was my misunderstanding I guess. I thought grain referred to how much powder there was. I'm dumb
 

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Yeah, the "grain" refers to the weight of the bullet. Though powder is also measured in "grains". They never tell you what the powder is, or how much. Heavier bullets go slower.. and you're not dumb, you just didn't know. I've gotten that question many times.
 

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Here's the 44 magnum page from the Ballistics 101 website - a nice compilation (and more) of rifle and pistol stats by caliber and brand with speed, muzzle energy and bullet size and type in a very readable format. 44 Magnum Ballistics Chart | Ballistics 101

I refer to the site often! The range of what is available in 44 Mag is pretty amazing!
 
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Oh ok, it was my misunderstanding I guess. I thought grain referred to how much powder there was. I'm dumb
NO problem, you just lost me there for a minute!
as mentioned the grain weight on factory ammo is the projectile weight!
really the 2 rounds that you mention are on polar opposites of the 44 mag projectiles, the 240 being considered as "Normal" so you would see extreme differences in the 2 that you were using.
you just need to pick out the projectile (including) weight that suits the need .
hope that helps.
 
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