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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm very interested in learning how to reload, and until recently when shooting my Judge had no idea that you could reload 410's (I'm new to guns)until a gentleman at a range asked for my shells. I didn't see 410's in the Speer book, and since i have the option, figured I'd ask you guys which is easier to learn. I know that shot gun shells are cheaper, and doesn't seem worth the effort, but if i could recreate the PDX1's that would be awesome! I'd like to be able to cast bullets/pellets as well (seems like 410 would be more fun in creativity of different loads . ) So for a novice with an option.... learn 410 or 45? Thanks!!
 

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I don't reload shotgun shells, but I do .45Colt. Like you said shotgun ammo is cheap enough, with the exception of defensive stuff. I can say reloading the .45Colt is a pretty simple straight forward process, and enjoyable too. With the cost of .45Colt, reloading it makes more sense economically to me.
 
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I believe the correct answer is yes. Reload either. Or both. You will learn alot about your ammo and your gun as you go. You wont save money because you will shoot more. But the cost per round will go down and you should be able to produce a batch of quality ammo fairly easily with a little practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is reloading something like a defensive round even possible? Or would i be getting myself in over my head being new?
 

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Once you learn the process, you can reload your own defensive ammo. Projectiles and powder charges will be the only difference basically.
 

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Its possible tho many advise against it for legal reasons. I dont really have an opin on that yet. But reloading target rounds can save you enough coin to splurge on the SD ammo of your choice. If you choose to go that route.
Many big ammo makers do offer their high end SD bullets for sale to reloaders also.

Edited to add: by legal i mean liability reasons
 

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Yes you can reload .410 and .45 colt and yes after a few reloads with .410 one can start saving some change on them also....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok cool, for some reason I actually prefer to shoot the 410 out of the judge over the 45, which is why i asked, I'd assume the tools for reloading 410 is different than 45's, and since i prefer the defensive rounds, in my personal case, I should learn that to save money. But wanted to ask first so that I don't get over my head. Any recommendation on good places to buy books or tools for the 410 reloads?
 

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You can reload 410 no problem but all you are gonna be able to do is buck or birdshot. I don't think anyone offers any other types of load for them, with the exception of slugs.
 

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Debating the "Legal Issues" of handloads for self defense can get as protracted as the ole "Ford vs. Chevy" debate.

My stock answer is, "it depends on the political climate of the region you live in".

During my legal/law enforcement career I've testified in depositions & court in numerous shooting cases.

Here in my area of the "Deep South" the number one issue has always been "Was the shooting justified under the law" period. Whether or not the ammo used was commercial or handloaded has never been an issue.

:r_c: If you have doubts, check with your nearest State's Attorney office.

 

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I save a lot of money AND get the rounds that I want for pistol and rifle both competition/range and SD.

I recently acquired a used Lee Load All 12 gauge reloader for less than free (bought a 12 & 20 mounted on the same board at an auction - kept the 12 sold the 20G for more than double the price of both) SO I'm now in the 12 gauge reloading business. I'm only looking at 00 buckshot and 1oz slugs AND will be casting my own. I'm currently running through 5 lbs of Hornady 00 buck while i wait for some more components.

My first loads matched and beat brand name buffered 12G 00 buck loads. The SD shot shells are where the real savings lies. I'll probably never touch birdshot. Buying shelf components saves a LOT (free hulls a given) - once I'm casting projectiles i'll be at pennies on the dollar.

It works with shot or pistol and rifle and (IMHO) none are that difficult - - IF you do your homework and talk to experienced people as well!
 

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Is reloading something like a defensive round even possible? Or would i be getting myself in over my head being new?
Sure its possible, with the exception of certain self defese projectiles that are not available to the reloader.
Most are however!
I personally would NOT reccomend that the beginner reloader venture into this territory however!
there is no difference in the process of loading SD ammo, but there is more riding on it working properly if it must be placed into use!
once a relaoder gains some experience in reloading certainly the reloader can produce as good or better self defense ammo than he/she can buy as it can be taliored to the individual and the individual weapon.
 

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The problems with reloading shot shells here is the avialbility of the shot.
Now you can order hulls, wads, powder/ primers online but first shot is hard to locate and secondly its expensive to ship.
in the case of the 410 I don't see a lot of free hulls laying about either?
NowI don't do a Judge but have heard that they also prefer (need) the ultra high brass hulls to operate well?
I would guess that if you belonged to a shooting club where there was a lot of Skeet/ trap shooting they normally order a lot of shotshell components in mass, but otherwise in my parts its hard to locate them.
 

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I use 444 Marlin cases to load for 410 used in the Judge. Makes a really fine round and will drop out of the chamber simply by tipping the gun up after firing. You can mix and match buck and ball and shot any way you want. You will never over pressure the cartridge. I use 2 1/2" load data and Winchester WAA41 shot cups. Great performers. Was doing it this way long before the Judge came on the scene for my single shot and double barreled 410 long guns. 45 Colt is easier to load in large quantity than my version of 410 and you can load 45 Colt shot shells. They won't perform on a par with 410 but they do work. The Speer book has data for 45 Colt shot shells.
 

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I would stick to 45 Colt to start and se what you can get for 410 SD components later. but that's just me.
 

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Much good input/advise!

Which round do you shoot more of?!
 

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I don't load any shotgun ammo except 10 gauge. Just not cost effective for any of the other stuff. I do handload .45 Colt for my Contender, but mostly for my Ruger Blackhawk. Saves me money and I load better ammo than I can buy from the factory, tailored for my firearm. I also cast my own bullets for practice and perhaps hunting. I have a 255 grain flat point Lee mold that shoots great and a 340 grain .457" flat nose I size to .451 and shoot in the blackhawk. It'll rock ya back, but it's accurate and, well, lord knows it has enough lead in it. ROFL! I like my hot 300 grain XTP load, loaded hotter than I'd do with a Judge, for hunting. The Ruger and the TC Contender are very strong guns capable of more pressure than a standard Judge, so I won't encourage hot loads in the Judge unless it's a Raging Judge.
 

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.410 ammo in my area is expensive for anything other then bird shot loads. Even those run around $8.00 for a box of 20 or 25.

An inexpensive way to begin reloading .410 is using this kit:

Lanes Reloading

Very similar to the old Lee Loaders that are now very hard to come by.
 
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The processes of reloading shotshell and metallic cartridges are similar on a basic level but there are extra steps to loading shotshell. Since you're dealing with .410, you should be able to find or order from RCBS the dies you need to resize on a conventional press (call them because it's not a listed item but was available the last time I heard).

If I were to start loading .410's, I'd get some brass hulls that worked off either 209 or large pistol or rifle primers and use them for my reloads (that's what I did when I first started loading BP shotshells for my antique 10 gauge). But be forewarned, good brass hulls are expensive(index for example) but they'll last forever if you can keep folks from stepping on them. That eliminates the need to find and buy a roll crimper (Ballistic Products sells one that chucks in a hand drill) or a device that would form a star crimp. If you are roll crimping, you use a stiff cardboard wad (I like the heavier 1/8" over powder cardboard wads better than the thin over shot card wads that look like they were punched out of a milk carton) to seal the top of the shell and if you are using brass hulls, you need to glue it in place. Elmer's school glue works well sometimes, but wood glue, hot glue, ducto cement and water glass (you get that at the drug store) have all been used successfully. You could actually load shotshells on the cheap with no more tools than an adjustable shot scoop (got mine from Dixie Gunworks) and your normal powder measure if you are loading smokeless or a BP measure if you are loading with BP if you can find a way to get them primed- and there ARE ways to prime without a press.
 

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My recommendation would be to start with the .45. As has been pointed out, loading shot shells is not rocket science, but for a newbie reloader, what you want do to is a few stages beyond simply loading target Shotshell loads. The .45 s would be an easier place for you to " get your feet wet" & get familiar with basic reloading concepts - better chance of making loads that go bang, & lower probability of creating an overpressure situation.
 
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