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Owned several 3" barrel revolvers over the years in everything from .22 to .45. The extra inch of barrel over the 2" helps in sight radius for me. Pocket or holster carry is about the same. As I get older I like for what I carry to be both comfortable and comforting. Knowing the bullets are going to hit where I point takes care of the comforting part. Good leather takes care of comfortable, Ruger dependability is also nice.
 

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A 3" .357/.38 is a heck of a good tool. I won't trade my 3" 65 S&W for anything
 
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I have a 3" Taurus 66 and a 3" Rossi M68. I kinda prefer a 2" as it sticks out of my Hume JIT slide less. Of course, my M85 is a 2" and I carry it in a front pocket. I'd been carrying my 66 on the belt, but I really like the lighter 605 Poly and its 2" barrel and round butt profile, easier to conceal and I can hit just fine with it. A 3", if it had a round butt, would work for me, too, but my 66 is a square butt. I never carry the Rossi. I prefer my M85 in the caliber, better trigger for one.
 

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It only took me useage from 1986-1987 to get used to the refugly polymer pioneer "GLOCK".

However it may take me a decade + to get used polymer revolvers.
Here, cross yourself and close your eyes....:D

I had an initial hard time coming to grips with the concept, but it offers advantages. The gun is reasonably priced and LIGHT and easy to carry and shoot. You can't get a .357 this light for this price. Either it's steel or it's pricey titanium or scandium. The modern tough polymer is a fantastic material and a break through IMHO, at least for magnum carry revolvers.

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I like a good 3" revolver. I carry my 3" Rossi .357 quite a bit.

Id be interested to at lest hold the Ruger and see what it felt like in my hand.
 
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It only took me useage from 1986-1987 to get used to the refugly polymer pioneer "GLOCK".

However it may take me a decade + to get used polymer revolvers.
yea. I know what you mean.
 

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Very very Interesting! :cool: I do like three inch barreled Revolvers, particularly if they are +P capable.
 

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Here, cross yourself and close your eyes....:D

I had an initial hard time coming to grips with the concept, but it offers advantages. The gun is reasonably priced and LIGHT and easy to carry and shoot. You can't get a .357 this light for this price. Either it's steel or it's pricey titanium or scandium. The modern tough polymer is a fantastic material and a break through IMHO, at least for magnum carry revolvers.

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I'm with the "tough to get used to polymer revolvers" crowd. I've owned a couple of poly semis, and I'm pretty fold of my XD. But polymer revolvers are just harder to get used to for some reason. Maybe part of that reason is that from what I've read, polymer revolvers are right on the "too light" line. Too light means they kick too much, and as already noted that can mean other issues like bullets slipping crimp.
 
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Polymer for a work/utility gun I can handle. Once I adjusted to Glocks from stand point of being a tool and looks didn't matter, they were OK. Same with the revolvers, my days of wanting fancy BBQ guns and leather have passed. We got out a can of .89¢ cap indicates color and covered the stainless finish on a big bore revolver. Put the barrel over a 3/8" wooden rod and painted it all. So a Tupper Ware revolver is OK too. No worry about scratching the grips or finish.
 

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Native Texan have you ran many 158 grain full load .357's through it?I had the Scandi Smith and bullets jumped crimp.
I put a heavy roll crimp on my loads. I've fired about 30 cast gas checked 165SWCs over 14.5 grains 2400, Skeeter Skelton's old standby load, pretty warm load. I had no problems, but the load shoots WAY high. The gun shoots to POA with a 140 JHP Speer over 17 grains 2400 and with a .38 wadcutter/2.7 grains Bullseye. So, I practice with the .38 wadcutters and carry the magnums. This keeps stresses off the gun, too. I don't wish to run a constant diet of hot .357 through it. The 140 grain load clocks 1333 fps/552 ft lbs from the 2" barrel and shoots into 3" at 25 yards off the bench.

The Scandium Smith is 12 ounces. The 605 poly is 19 ounces, a LITTLE more beef. :D I think the LCR is 17 ounces in .357 magnum. With the 140s, the Poly isn't hard to shoot at all. The 165s tend to be a little rough on the hand. But, the 140s I could shoot all day. :D
 

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Not even the new 66?
Nope. For the same reason I wouldn't trade my model 58 for a 4 " 57. I'll take a fixed-sight gun that shoots my favorite round to POA any day.
 

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This is my 4" nickel 66 vs my 3" blued. The 3" now has a Hogue grip on it. The inch less barrel REALLY helps concealment over the 4" and accuracy and velocity doesn't suffer badly with light bullet loads vs 2". Best I can group with my 2" guns is about 3" at 25 yards off the bench, accuracy that I consider totally acceptable. The 4" shoots 1" with its favorite loads off the bench and the 3" shoots 1.5". If you like 125 grain .357 magnum, a 2" will KILL the performance, all flash/bang. The 3" works a lot better. This is one reason I shoot a 140 grain bullet in short barrels, doesn't lose as much from the short barrel as does the 125 grain stuff.

I haven't chronographed it, but Buffalo Bore offers a hot 125 grain load that has astounding performance from a 2" barrel. I cannot duplicate their claimed performance. I don't know what powders they use, but that load is pretty special.

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Oh, another thing you'll notice about the 3" gun, the ejector rod is the same length as the 4" gun, will fully eject magnum brass. The 2" has a necessarily shorter ejector rod that cannot fully extract cases. Slap it and it'll usually pop 'em out, but hot with the reliability of the 3' gun.

Yeah, I quite acknowledge that 3" guns have advantages. This is why I jumped all over that 3" 66 when I found it used at a gun show. :D I still carry it on occasion even though it's 35 ounces of steel.
 
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