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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
24/7 "Gritty" trigger pull - cause ID'd and remedy applied

Greetings from a noob - I'm no gunsmith, have no gunsmithing tools or experience.
But I do have some ordinary hand tools and some toys including a USB microscope I gave my son for Christmas a couple of years ago.
Even before I purchased a 24/7 I read reviews and viewed video reviews of the gun. A common observation, apart from the long DA part of the trigger pull on the first round, was that the trigger pull felt "Gritty" or "Sandy" during the SA or final portion of the trigger pull, when the firing pin was coming back before being released.

I looked at the parts and where they engaged, and concluded that a possible culprit would be the engaging surfaces of the rear edge of the trigger bar and the front-facing surface of the sear, where the two meet. As the trigger bar moves rearward, pulling the firing pin backward, it slides downward along the engaged surface of the sear until the edge of the sear clears and the firing pin is free to snap forward.

I removed my firing pin and looked closely at the surface of the sear--my middle-aged eyes don't focus well on small things close up, but even they could see milling marks on the engagement surface of the sear.

I decided to try to smooth the surface of the sear. For this task, a very smooth Arkansas Stone knife sharpening stone from my knife sharpening kit seemed appropriate. Taking the stone, I applied a few drops of oil and proceeded carefully to lap the surface of the sear, just enough to smooth off those milling marks.

The microscope is the tool used to take the attached snapshots - they helped me to see things better and made it possible to share with others.


  1. In the first pic you see the rear surface of the trigger bar which engages the sear. Haven't done anything with that yet.
  2. The second shot is a picture of the unmodified factory sear on the removed firing pin (with the sear pointing up for visibility). It shows clearly the milling marks on its engagement surface.
  3. Lapped sear, approximating the angle of the first picture.
  4. Another angle of the lapped sear.

Writing this after finishing the procedure and reassembling the firearm, I can say that dry firing seems quite a bit smoother on the DA part of the trigger pull.

It would be good to have a bit of feedback - do you think this was a good idea or have I just voided my warranty and ruined a good firing pin assembly? Your wisdom and input would be deeply appreciated. Will post a range report when I get a chance.



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Writing this after finishing the procedure and reassembling the firearm, I can say that dry firing seems quite a bit smoother on the DA part of the trigger pull.

It would be good to have a bit of feedback - do you think this was a good idea or have I just voided my warranty and ruined a good firing pin assembly? Your wisdom and input would be deeply appreciated. Will post a range report when I get a chance.
If all you did was polish away tool marks, the trigger is smoother in action, and the gun still works . . . well done!

As far as the lifetime warranty, don't worry about it and don't bring it up if you send in your gun for work. From the photos you posted, the polishing looks like what those parts may look like anyway over the course of thousands of rounds of firing anyway.
 
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