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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Came across an old relic that had been laying in the dark bowels of out of sight, out of mind for a long, long time in a storage locker of mine.

Truth is, she is a beauty with classic lines but with a twist in the lever action design. The single shot capacity only adds to it's timeless beauty in simplistic fashion.

If I recall it was a passed down thru the family on my Mothers side from her sisters husband family. No one in that side of the family cared for firearms and it traveled toward our side of the family. Not that this really matters to a hill of beans to anyone.

It is a Stevens Favorite 1915 with a full octagon barrel in .22 long. Not able to trace the exact date of manufacture, but it would have been between 1915 and 1935. The wood stock looks in very nice condition. The octagon barrel has some patina but no rust, maybe a small bump and bruise, nothing to be concerned with. No noticeable damage that would give concerns in any way. I mean for a 22 rifle that could well be over 100 years old it looks pretty dang good!!

Now with all of that being said, would you have any hesitation as to loading a round of modern .22LR ammunition in it and pulling the trigger?

And yes I will get a picture posted as soon as I can. Like a darn fool I took the time to fondle it like a kid with a new cap pistol but forgot to take a couple of photos before placing it back into the dark storage abyss.

Here is a link to a YouTube video of a like Stevens 1915
 

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Congrats on finding a forgotten firearm. I'm looking forward to seeing those pictures.

Near the beginning of your tale you say that it takes 22 long, then later you ask about shooting 22 long rifle in it. Keep in mind, those are two different types of .22 ammo. Normally, 22 guns don't shoot more than one of the three (short, long and long rifle), although there are some that do. I'm sure you already know this, just saying.....
 
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I would hesitate to fire it, even after extensive cleaning and oiling... something about new generation ammo in antique guns just rubs me the wrong way.
 

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I'd wager that that rifle was built more solidly than many of the small caliber firearms many purchase and shoot on "the regular".
I wouldn't load it with CCI mini mags, but I personally, would have to put at least a couple of rounds downrange. Just to say I shot my own personal piece of history. Just my .02
 

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I would not hesitate to shoot it with any .22 ammo provided it is chambered in .22lr and not .22 long. Metallurgy in 1915 was better than prior to 1900 and is capable of standing up almost forever to the low pressure .22lr round.
 
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I'd put a few downrange after a tuneup.
 
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I need my dad to send me a pic, but I believe he has one of those. One time that I visited he showed it to me, we found that the shells got jammed really bad. You know how we found that out? We fired it. Probably a couple dozen times. It worked great once we got the chamber ironed out.

I wouldn't be afraid to shoot it, I remember it being a hoot.
 

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I did double check it out, it is 22 long rifle.

Thanks to all who noticed my mistake.
With guns of that era, it's an important detail. No sense in tearing something up that's lasted the better part of a century. .22LR you can get 'bout anywhere. .22Long is a horse of a different color.

Put me in the 'Clean it up good and shoot the snot out of it' camp since it's chambered in .22LR.

Them little falling blocks have a rep for being extremely accurate with ammo they like, too.
 
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I'd clean it up. check the bore real well, polish the chamber and shoot whatever 22LR I had available.
 
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I've restored several very old 22 rifles here are a few things to look for:
1. Use a bore light and look for uneven rifling or bulged barrel. Can you still see the rifling?
2. Clean barrel bore , then soak it overnight with a good clp--I use cork stoppers or in a pinch used 22 casings..just be aware if not a cork - it will leak out a bit. Then brush it out and take a good look down that barrel. You are looking for inconsistencies. If you can see the rifling (even if bore is dark and a little rusty)and when you chamber a round seats and fits well with very little play, the barrel is good to go.
3. Next is the furniture - is it still tightly attached to the receiver/barrel? - loose furniture can lead to damage/wear to the receiver/barrel
4. Now the hard part - if you can take the receiver apart - it is probably way past time to clean and inspect. Rust in a receiver can mean the death of a rifle. But it can be dealt with, but the action will need to be taken down and each part inspected/cleaned/lubed.
I know this sounds like more trouble than its worth, but I have tried to run old 22's that had problems,, and it didn't go well for the rifles. Don't just think because it is a 22LR, you can't get hurt if the rifle screws up. A small crack in a rusty bore can cause a bore blow out with shrapnel,,even in 22. One of these days I am going to have to get a FFL, so folks can mail me old guns to fix up. Or if you are ever driving up north of the greatest state Texas, I am very close to NE Okla and SW Missouri,,in far NW Ark. Be glad to have you stay a few days while I restore that workhorse for you.
 

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I saw some actual .22 Short recently...
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've restored several very old 22 rifles here are a few things to look for:
1. Use a bore light and look for uneven rifling or bulged barrel. Can you still see the rifling?
2. Clean barrel bore , then soak it overnight with a good clp--I use cork stoppers or in a pinch used 22 casings..just be aware if not a cork - it will leak out a bit. Then brush it out and take a good look down that barrel. You are looking for inconsistencies. If you can see the rifling (even if bore is dark and a little rusty)and when you chamber a round seats and fits well with very little play, the barrel is good to go.
3. Next is the furniture - is it still tightly attached to the receiver/barrel? - loose furniture can lead to damage/wear to the receiver/barrel
4. Now the hard part - if you can take the receiver apart - it is probably way past time to clean and inspect. Rust in a receiver can mean the death of a rifle. But it can be dealt with, but the action will need to be taken down and each part inspected/cleaned/lubed.
I know this sounds like more trouble than its worth, but I have tried to run old 22's that had problems,, and it didn't go well for the rifles. Don't just think because it is a 22LR, you can't get hurt if the rifle screws up. A small crack in a rusty bore can cause a bore blow out with shrapnel,,even in 22. One of these days I am going to have to get a FFL, so folks can mail me old guns to fix up. Or if you are ever driving up north of the greatest state Texas, I am very close to NE Okla and SW Missouri,,in far NW Ark. Be glad to have you stay a few days while I restore that workhorse for you.
Thank you for sharing such detailed knowledge and information. I do believe i will take your advice in taking my time to properly inspect and prep this weapon before shooting it.

Is there any reason that I could not also fire 22 short ammunition from this antique?
 

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Take Silverstring's advice and then enjoy working it. Stevens made quality firearms and that one in the video is easy on the eyes.
 

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In lieu of having a smith take a look at it, Silverstring's advice seems pretty sound. I thought about firing the H&R Young America .32 (listed in my .sig) until I thought about it a little deeper and took it to a gunsmith. He suggested NOT chancing it as it did not lock up very well and I might blow the thing up if the cylinder-barrel alignment was off upon discharge. Sound advice. It now sits in a shadowbox display frame in my study.

But for the Stevens I think after doing what was suggested it should be good to go.
 
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Looks similar to the Stephens Crackshot #26 that I found in an rental house years ago that we were painting. it was found in a closet.
No serial number, don't know the date either. it has a round barrel , I have shot it a couple of times to see if it would fire, the spring for the lever is weak and its not in nearly as good of condition as yours, the other side of the stock has "JOEY" carved in it.
I am sure that some youngster really thought a lot of his first gun.
 

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