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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not a 1911 guy but I've always heard that closing a 1911 slide (any brand) with a round in the chamber will damage the extractor. Perhaps someone with real 1911 smarts can tell me if this is fact or myth. Along similar lines, I have to wonder if taurushater broke his gun by doing this.
 

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Doing this with a 1911 or any pistol is a bad idea and could potentially cause damage.
 

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It will cause damage to any semi-auto pistol and is not a good idea.
 
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This is true of most all Semi-Automatic Pistols. They are designed to feed from the Magazine. Even on Pistols that will somewhat tolerate that, it does wear on the Extractor Hook. It's a bad practice.
 
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What do you mean closing a slide with a round in the chamber hurts the extractor?

Every time you shoot a round comes up and the slide closes with a round in the chamber, Do you mean putting one in the chamber manually and letting it slam home? or manually removing a live round from the chamber?
And what is the proper way to close a slide with a round in the chamber?
 

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What do you mean closing a slide with a round in the chamber hurts the extractor?

Every time you shoot a round comes up and the slide closes with a round in the chamber, Do you mean putting one in the chamber manually and letting it slam home? or manually removing a live round from the chamber?
And what is the proper way to close a slide with a round in the chamber?
The discussion from the OP, as I understand it, centers around the idea of putting a round in the chamber, THEN dropping the slide on it.

When a semi-auto feeds a round from the magazine, the rim of the cartridge slides under the extractor as the round is chambered. Normal operation.

If you put a round in the chamber and drop the slide (bolt) on it, the extractor is forced to flex outward to clear the rim. Abnormal operation.

You can close the slide on a round that is already in the chamber a lot before you get any noticeable problems, or it might happen fairly quickly. It not only depends on the gun, but also on the cartridge, the extractor, etc., etc., etc. Too many variables to say you WILL have a problem in X00 rounds, or to say you won't have a problem at all. I know people who have done it numerous times without any problem.

There is no proper way to close the slide on a cartridge that is already in the chamber -- take the round out, put it in the magazine, and chamber it properly. Yes, even snap-caps -- they have the same general profile as a cartridge, including a rim used for extracting them from the chamber.
 

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There is no proper way to close the slide on a cartridge that is already in the chamber -- take the round out, put it in the magazine, and chamber it properly. Yes, even snap-caps -- they have the same general profile as a cartridge, including a rim used for extracting them from the chamber.
What he said!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I nominate the Walker56 post as a sticky (but with a descriptive title and bold-face the last paragraph). This topic (as well as 709 disassembly) seem to come up every week.
 

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The discussion from the OP, as I understand it, centers around the idea of putting a round in the chamber, THEN dropping the slide on it.
I guess I'm still a little confused. How is one putting a round in the chamber and if not fed from the magazine why would you do that?
 

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I guess I'm still a little confused. How is one putting a round in the chamber and if not fed from the magazine why would you do that?
You lock the slide open, drop it in the tube, and release the slide. Some people do it because they're too lazy to feed a round from the magazine and pop it out to load another.
 

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You lock the slide open, drop it in the tube, and release the slide. Some people do it because they're too lazy to feed a round from the magazine and pop it out to load another.
I have never done this, have never had a extractor break, and will continue to do so but good to know that it is bad for the gun.
 

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Yup, doing that routinely on a 1911 with a traditional extractor is certain to cause undo stress on the extractor. Also, as solid and sturdy as the 1911 is, the extractor is the least robust part of the gun. Broken extractors are just part and parcel of owning a 1911. Some may break in the first few rounds, others may not break for years. My PT1911AL has more than 12,000 rounds through it. It's still on the original extractor. But, sooner or later the extractor will break. This seems to be a hard concept for new 1911 owners to grasp. Dropping the slide on a chambered round will definitely not help extend the life of your ejector.
 
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Yup, doing that routinely on a 1911 with a traditional extractor is certain to cause undo stress on the extractor. Also, as solid and sturdy as the 1911 is, the extractor is the least robust part of the gun. Broken extractors are just part and parcel of owning a 1911. Some may break in the first few rounds, others may not break for years. My PT1911AL has more than 12,000 rounds through it. It's still on the original extractor. But, sooner or later the extractor will break. This seems to be a hard concept for new 1911 owners to grasp. Dropping the slide on a chambered round will definitely not help extend the life of your ejector.
Even on newer design guns, it isn't recommended. Even if it doesn't break, it could round off the edge of the extractor causing extraction issues. You definitely don't want that happening if you ever had to use your gun in self defense.
 
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