Got to ask a silly question
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Thread: Got to ask a silly question

  1. #1
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    Got to ask a silly question

    So its obviously pool season and I was wondering if this is something to be concerned with. This might sound stupid but I'm concerned about indirect contact with chlorine water and my firearm. Such as after swimming when I dry off should I be concerned with the dryed chlorine on my skin or on any artical of clothing that could have gotten wet with pool water but now dryed?

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    Hmmm.. I don't think so. We built our house 25 years ago and put an in-ground pool and spa in. Been getting in it regularly then drying off and then carrying when I go run errands. No damage no any of my guns finishes. As long as you don't expose the gun directly to water (or go swmming with it) I think you should be ok.

    But have it handy though!!

    777Driver and Sekol like this.
    There is no greater protection against evil on the rampage than a loaded weapon in the hands of a free man.

  3. #3
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    I would NOT let the chlorine water come into contact with my gun. Keep it nearby wrapped in a towel but wouldn’t stick it in your waistband.

    So relieved. Thought you were gonna ask the old “should I carry my gun in my swimming trunks. No, what if it slipped and made itself around back . . . .”
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    "To own firearms is to affirm that freedom is not a gift from government...As the Founding Fathers knew well, a government that does not trust its honest, law-abiding, taxpaying citizens with the means of self-defense is not itself worthy of trust."

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    Deleted.
    Last edited by TrucksNCoffee; 07-04-2019 at 02:29 PM.

  6. #5
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    Federal regulations like DOT classify chlorine as a corrosive. That means it can corrode stainless steel. Even some kitchen cleaning guides warn against bleach (which of course contains chlorine) and stainless. I can't imagine carbon steel would fare better. I'd be very careful to rinse any chlorine residue of my skin and change clothes before strapping a gun back on.
    "It is wonderful, in the event of a street fight, how few bullets seem to hit the men they are aimed at." Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, Theodore Roosevelt, 1888

  7. #6
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    As for chlorinated brake cleaner, here is one reference to the dangers of using it on guns:

    https://www.thehighroad.org/index.ph...gerous.545442/

    Researching this question, I see lots of people specifying chlorine-free brake cleaner. There are two reasons. One is the potential health effects of chlorinated brake cleaners, and the other is that chlorine isn't kind to metal. In addition to general corrosion, it can lead to or greatly accelerate stress cracking. Those are not ideas I'm happy about for firearms.

    https://www.corrosionpedia.com/defin...-cracking-cscc

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_corrosion_cracking

    Having read all this, I'd use brake cleaner before cerakoting a gun, but otherwise, it's overkill. If you want to get all of the lubricants/protective oils out, go for it.

    To bring this back to the OP's question, I'd still say rinse the skin, and change/wash the clothes that were exposed to chlorine. Maybe the levels involved are too low to do much, but in a world where people will go on for pages and pages about whether CLP is better than synthetic motor oil or similar questions, underplaying the possible risks of chlorine near metal seems unwise to me. YMMV.
    "It is wonderful, in the event of a street fight, how few bullets seem to hit the men they are aimed at." Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, Theodore Roosevelt, 1888

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    Unless the pool was filled from a natural source like a pond or creek, I'd be more concerned about the flouride than the chlorine. Flouride is used to chemically etch or pickle (deep clean) metal.
    Ammo will get you through times of no money, better than money will get you through times of no ammo.


 

 

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