Load data concerning LSWC, SWC vs. LRNFP... any difference?
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Thread: Load data concerning LSWC, SWC vs. LRNFP... any difference?

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    Load data concerning LSWC, SWC vs. LRNFP... any difference?

    When I come across load data that gives data for a cast lead bullet, does it matter if I use one type of lead bullet vs. another lead? Can I use a LSWC in place of data that list a LRNFP? or visa versa?

    If not, what is the difference? lead is lead right?

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    OAL is used as a proxy for available case volume, since part of the case volume is occupied by the seated bullet. Different bullet geometries give rise to different available case volumes, which directly affect the burn rate and pressure of the cartridge.

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    Here are a few I am sure there are more. All of these bullets in the same weight in theory will be different lengths requiring different powder charges.

    LFP – Lead Flat Point
    LHP – Lead Hollow Point
    LRN – Lead Round Nose
    LRNFP - Lead Round Nose Flat Point
    LSWC – Lead Semiwadcutter
    LSWC-GC – Lead Semiwadcutter Gas Checked
    LWC – Lead Wadcutter
    LTC – Lead Truncated Cone
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    Very helpful guys. Thank you

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    When I change styles of bullets, I start over with the minimum load and work up. As stated above, pressures will change depending on the depth that the bullet is seated. I've found that most of the time, the loads will be very close to each other. Small cases like the 9mm will show pressure changes more quickly than say a .38SP.
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    In theory, no. In practice you can, most of the time. Depends somewhat on what caliber we're talking about and what the purpose of your load is.

    In theory, you should only load using data for the specific bullet you're using to a specific OAL. In practice few do. For example, two different LRN's seated to the same OAL can still have different case capacity due to different degrees of ogive on the bullet.

    I came to the conclusion that it makes little difference unless you're loading to maximum chamber pressure. Most lead bullet shooters aren't even close to trying to do that. For practice ammo I consider data for a 158gr SWC generic in .38/.357. I wouldn't substitute a radically different profile (LRNFP) for the most part unless there was a load listed for a powder that I couldn't find any other data for. Then I'd take in consideration what the cartridge was and the gun I was going to shoot it in. Doing something like this in the .38 spl target ammo and shooting them in a .357 revolver is a lot more comfortable than doing the same while trying to load for maximum velocity in the .45 ACP.
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    Quote Originally Posted by likesbigbullets View Post
    When I come across load data that gives data for a cast lead bullet, does it matter if I use one type of lead bullet vs. another lead? Can I use a LSWC in place of data that list a LRNFP? or visa versa?
    If not, what is the difference? lead is lead right?
    as has been stated already!
    and to add to Fishings list, one that can and does make a difference is the hollow based projectiles, they increase case capacity in even like length projectiles that are flat based.
    If you begin the thought process by immedately thinging case capacity then it all kind of makes sence, you got a closed tube, if you seat something in it at a certian depth it will have a certain capacity, if you seat it deeper then that capcity is reduced, if you put an explosive in that case then the less capcity the more PSI that the explosion has--IE-more pressure.
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    You can measure the bullet length and subtract it from the OAL, as long as the remainder is more than or the same as with a bullet you have data for you will have the same or more case capacity and should be ok to use that data with bullets of the same weight.
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    Quote Originally Posted by likesbigbullets View Post
    If not, what is the difference? lead is lead right?

    It's not quite that simple, there are a few things to keep in mind when loading cast bullets, one of which is leading. I've found that if I use a load that gives me about 1000ft/sec with soft lead, leading will be a problem. With hard cast bullets I don't have that problem. But to answer your original question, The swc and rnfp bullets I've seen tend to be almost the same height so you should be fine. The thing to keep in mind is that you want to work up your loads and the load data provided should only be used as a guide for a starting point.

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    Ok, I've read what you have all stated and it makes sense. The "usable space" is what makes the difference right? Is there a standard amount of "usable space" that is considered optimum for each caliber? or as some of you said dependent on the type of "explosive"? I did the math and figured out that it isn't that hard to find the inner diameter and length of the amount of space behind a bullet. Would I be right in my math to assume that multiplying the two variables will give me the cubic inches of space behind the seated bullet?

 

 
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