Load data old manuals vs new
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    Load data old manuals vs new

    My newest manual is a 50th lyman, I have been cross referencing load data and searching on the interwebs. I have found a ton of manuals and the older ones seem to have much hotter loads due to pressure rating changes over the years. My main question is is it ok to load to the old manual data? or would it be advised to load to the current manual data? Have seen some loads which are a few grains higher then current and do not want to grenade anything lol
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    If I was interested in trying them, I would work up to those loads like any other.
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    I've always looked to multiple sources when developing a load and have found that even with modern manuals, loads vary from book to book. I currently have the Speer v12 and v14, Lymans 48th, Lymans 50th, Hornady 10, and a bunch of different manufacturers sites that also provide load data (Hodgedon/IMR/Winchester; Alliant; Accurate Arms...) and I look at the components they are using in their load workup for any given round and compare to what I am using. If I am unfamiliar with the powder or the round I start with the absolute lowest starting charge that I find across all information and work up from there.

    I usually don't try to go for maximum powder charge just because its the max, and have found that max charge isn't always the best. For instance, working up 10mm loads, I found that just a couple of 10ths below max provided best accuracy for defensive rounds.

    And, to your point originally, Mr. X - older manuals most definitely have hotter loads. I'm almost positive that lawyers and liability questions were involved in decreasing the recommended loads.
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    Depends....

    If the variation is because the powder manufacturer changed his formula (like Hercules/Alliant did with 2400), then no. If it's because SAMMI lowered the maximum pressure over concern for older guns like they did with the .38 spl, but you are using a modern weapon of adequate construction, then you should be OK working up to it. If you don't know any history behind why the loads changed, then no.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yissnakk View Post
    I've always looked to multiple sources when developing a load and have found that even with modern manuals, loads vary from book to book. I currently have the Speer v12 and v14, Lymans 48th, Lymans 50th, Hornady 10, and a bunch of different manufacturers sites that also provide load data (Hodgedon/IMR/Winchester; Alliant; Accurate Arms...) and I look at the components they are using in their load workup for any given round and compare to what I am using. If I am unfamiliar with the powder or the round I start with the absolute lowest starting charge that I find across all information and work up from there.

    I usually don't try to go for maximum powder charge just because its the max, and have found that max charge isn't always the best. For instance, working up 10mm loads, I found that just a couple of 10ths below max provided best accuracy for defensive rounds.

    And, to your point originally, Mr. X - older manuals most definitely have hotter loads. I'm almost positive that lawyers and liability questions were involved in decreasing the recommended loads.
    figured as much ladder loads to the rescue. wish they had a affordable way for the reloader to measure pressure
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    You would likely have no problem working up loads using the old numbers, but keep in mind they release new load data for a reason. They're not just reducing the loads because they need to make a new manual.....and, they are working with the companies directly and it's entirely possible that Bullseye, for example, has changed, even slightly, from when those old manuals were new. You never know.
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiholdtruex View Post
    figured as much ladder loads to the rescue. wish they had a affordable way for the reloader to measure pressure
    For the most part, reloaders just have to go with 'signs' of excessive pressure, such as cratered/flattened/backing out primers, excessive deviation across a chronograph up around max expected velocities, split cases, spontaneous firearm disassembly, an odd tingling and bleeding hole where part of your gun hand used to be . . . .
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    I keep older versions for reference. I think for Lyman the major transition was between Lyman's 44th or 45th to Lyman's 46th. The loads do appear to be lighter after that point. I also generally load to mid levels based on the current data Most of my firearms however will handle +P loadings without a problem so that's an additional buffer built in.
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    I too am pretty much strictly a mid-range loader. I only shoot my reloads at paper zombies anyway and mid gives ME a nice compromise among power, safety and economy desires using my sole handgun powder, Win 231/HP-38.

    IMHO you won't go wrong using the latest published reloading data available. Yes there is some lawyer intervention at work, but also testing is now a lot more accurate using pressure transducers over the old 'crush a cylinder of metal and measure it' protocol. I also seem to recall reading articles ages ago by well known shooters who seemed to use a 'keep increasing the charge till the gun blowed up' methodology. - lol
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    The general consensus is that the data in the old manuals is "hotter" because their less sophisticated methods of measuring pressure meant they didn't know the actual pressures they were generating - and the pressure spikes in particular were in excess of SAAMI specs. There is also a pretty prevalent belief that as time goes by and there are guns with more years worth of wear and tear on them, the powder manufacturers have reduced the recommended amounts of powder in their loads to ensure they remain safe for even the oldest firearms that they are likely to be shot in.
    All that being said, the old loads were generally safe enough to not grenade guns that were mechanically sound back in the day, so there is no reason to believe that wouldn't still be true today - as long as the gun they are being shot in is in good condition.
    FWIW, I am with RandyP - I primarily load mid-range target loads. Though I have been thinking of loading some Buffalo Bore level old-school "FBI" loads for my SD carry revolvers.
    Last edited by BC605; 05-14-2019 at 09:09 PM.

 

 
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