Have you ever considered vehicle regression?
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    Have you ever considered vehicle regression?

    Vehicle Regression, fancy term for stepping back to vehicle basics.

    Todays cars and trucks offer darn near everything anyone could ask for, want, or even dream. The option list go on and on to the point that your car can drive itself as you grab a cold drink from the cooler console after heating a meal in the glove box warmer oven.

    Need to parallel park, no big deal. Just touch a button on the dash and your car will park itself for you. And once parked you don't need to remember where you parked because your smart phone will keep track of your cars location for you. Say it's a hot Texas day, you pull your car app up on your phone and start it from where you are at so that the AC has the time to cool down the interior before you get there.

    Down side is that all of these features can and will fail. Now day it takes a computer to locate error codes and reprogram the electrical side of the vehicle. Even the engine/transmission are electrical managed devices.

    Have you ever strongly considered stepping back in time to a more simple form of mechanics in choosing a vehicle? Vehicles that don't rely on an on board computer to run/time/manage the drivetrain. I'm talking the days of one spark plug per cylinder, points, rotor, condenser, distributor cap, and a simple 12 volt negative ground electrical system. You know...keep it simple mechanics.

    Some may refer to these vehicles as "Classics" or "Collectable" cars, but I am thinking more of "Stock" everyday driver usage.

    Downside is more needed attention to maintaining the basics. Finding insurance that will cover the "Actual Replacement Value", no that of a 50 year old deprecated hooptie. You also loose many of todays safety features and benefits of air bags, crumple zones, auto dial of 911, no tire air pressure monitors.

    So, what's your thoughts? Ever think about stepping back to an earlier more simple say of motor vehicle need and fulfillment?

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    I've always had a yen for an early 60's Ford Falcon with six banger and three on the tree.
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    I would go back to my '64 bel air with 283

    could fix or repair anything on that one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Czechbikr View Post
    I've always had a yen for an early 60's Ford Falcon with six banger and tree on the tree.
    I thought that I was the only one who has a penchant for the old Falcon line including the Rancho.
    Czechbikr, RonPT24/7 and jwc007 like this.

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    It would be nice but you'd have to be able to do everything yourself, hard to find anyone that can still set points, adjust valves, set timing, rebuild carbs, etc. Parts would be the real hangup, most of the conventional stuff is long gone. Things like points, condensers, and distributors often crossed to forklift, ag or heavy equipment applications and remained somewhat available for awhile but now, all that stuff has gone computerized too so many standard ignition parts are totally out of production. What NOS stuff is still floating around out there is all there is and it's gettin' to be less all the time.

    BTW...a positive ground system is no more complicated than a negative ground system......you just have to work on it from the other side of the vehicle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kschilk View Post
    It would be nice but you'd have to be able to do everything yourself, hard to find anyone that can still set points, adjust valves, set timing, rebuild carbs, etc. Parts would be the real hangup, most of the conventional stuff is long gone. Things like points, condensers, and distributors often crossed to forklift, ag or heavy equipment applications and remained somewhat available for awhile but now, all that stuff has gone computerized too so many standard ignition parts are totally out of production. What NOS stuff is still floating around out there is all there is and it's gettin' to be less all the time.

    BTW...a positive ground system is no more complicated than a negative ground system......you just have to work on it from the other side of the vehicle.
    On the flip side as to having work performed on an older drivetrain, you could purchase a Haynes Repair manual. The manual was simple easy to read and understand. And true, points, rotors and condensers are not as easy to come across as they once were, there were/are some conversion systems available that filled that parts void.

    I read an article this weekend talking about how farmers are fed up with all of the electronics designed to make tractors and farm machinery more user friendly. They are more than willing to give up the foo foo features of electronics and GPS calibrated abilities in exchange for a more user repairable equipment. These folks are farmers with learned mechanical skills, modern machinery now demands a computer tech who doesn't mind getting dirty and diesel coated.

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    I had a 1964 Plymouth Valiant slant-six with the push button transmission. It was simple and easy to fix. Which was good because it broke a lot. I'd be O.K. with the concept but you need to be a zealot about maintenance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonrjen View Post
    On the flip side as to having work performed on an older drivetrain, you could purchase a Haynes Repair manual. The manual was simple easy to read and understand. And true, points, rotors and condensers are not as easy to come across as they once were, there were/are some conversion systems available that filled that parts void.

    I read an article this weekend talking about how farmers are fed up with all of the electronics designed to make tractors and farm machinery more user friendly. They are more than willing to give up the foo foo features of electronics and GPS calibrated abilities in exchange for a more user repairable equipment. These folks are farmers with learned mechanical skills, modern machinery now demands a computer tech who doesn't mind getting dirty and diesel coated.
    Electronics/circuit boards really hate extreme heat, extreme cold, moisture, dust and vibration......guess what ya' get with ag equipment.
    jonrjen likes this.
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    At the same time cars have become more complicated, they have become more reliable. Your 1960 "simple" car or truck was worn out at 100,000 miles. Now, that is just broken-in. It is not unusual to get 200-300,000 miles. So, yeah, some peripherals have died before the vehicle gets junked, but even the heated/cooled/massaging seats have lasted past the point that that 1960 vehicle needed a total chassis-off restoration just to keep running.
    So I'll keep my air-bags ans stability control, and hopefully my next vehicle will even add adaptive cruise control and thumb warmers.
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    Here's my simple car. (One of them.) Hasn't had the engine rebuilt since new...that just over 65 years and 65K miles ago. Runs pretty good - pretty smooth and very quiet. It has been repainted and reupholstered, though. Obviously not a daily driver. I rewired the entire car last year and I'm trying to get the overdrive to start working again, so they require a lot of work, even when you don't put a lot of miles on them. I honestly couldn't imagine using this car as a daily driver. Even with the lower miles, the maintenance would be beyond daunting.
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